Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn ready to return to training on snow in Chile

1 Comment

The next step in Lindsey Vonn‘s recovery is one flight and a few days away.

The Olympic downhill champion has been cleared to ski on snow six months after reconstructive surgery on her right knee following tearing an ACL in a crash at the World Alpine Skiing Championships in February. She will fly to Portillo, Chile, for a training camp Friday. She previously said she planned to return to snow on Sept. 1, which is Sunday.

Vonn said her right knee is nearly at full strength compared to her left knee, 98 percent to be exact, and hasn’t needed to ice the knee after a workout in a month and a half, according to reports of those who saw Vonn working out in Vail, Colo., on Wednesday. The Denver Post has a write up here.

Vonn probably will start with free skiing in Portillo, but she is hoping to run some gates during her two-week stay. She will have to “negotiate” that with Dr. Bill Sterett, who performed her surgery in February.

“I asked him to come down,” Vonn said. “So he’s coming down, and will monitor me. I’m hoping to start training in a couple of days, but my expectations are sometimes a little out of whack.”

She also repeated she expects to start her season at the World Cup stop in nearby Beaver Creek, Colo., which takes place Nov. 29-Dec. 1. It’s the third stop on the World Cup tour, which begins Oct. 26 in Solden, Austria.

Vonn, 28, will be one of the early stars of the Olympics. Her best events come in the first full week of competition. The opening ceremony is Friday, Feb. 7. Vonn, if healthy, would be expected to race at least the super combined (Feb. 10), downhill (Feb. 12) and super-G (Feb. 15).

As the Games go on, the focus shifts from speed events to technical events. Vonn, best known for her speed prowess, will pass the proverbial torch to her teammates. Julia Mancuso, also a medal contender in the speed events, won the 2006 Olympic title in the giant slalom, which goes Feb. 18. Mikaela Shiffrin, 18, is the world champion in the slalom, which takes place Feb. 21.

Included in all of those events may be the woman who took the mantle of world’s greatest all-around skier from Vonn this past season — Slovenia’s Tina Maze.

U.S., Russia Olympic hockey jerseys revealed

Diana Taurasi opens door for 2020 Olympics

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Diana Taurasi may not be done with the U.S. national team after all.

The four-time Olympic champion “hopes to play through the 2020 Summer Games,” according to ESPN.com.

Taurasi, 34, said playing at Tokyo 2020 “would be incredible” after speaking with U.S. women’s national team director Carol Callan about her Team USA future earlier this month, according to the Arizona Republic. Taurasi recently signed a multiyear extension with the WNBA’s Phoenix Mercury, though the exact contract length wasn’t disclosed.

“It would be probably the biggest accomplishment if I can make it to five Olympics, but that’s so far down the road,” Taurasi said, according to the newspaper. “I’ve always said I’m really worried about these next couple of months with Phoenix then I’ll regroup and talk to USA Basketball again.

“There’s so many great young player that if it’s time to move on and go that direction, that’s great. If they want me to around to help and win another gold medal, I’ll do anything they want me to do.”

New U.S. coach Dawn Staley, an Olympic teammate of Taurasi’s in 2004, said in March that her gut feeling was that Taurasi would return for Tokyo 2020.

Taurasi said in August, right after the Rio final, that she had likely played her last Olympic game, ending her career 32-0 at the Olympics.

“This was probably my last one,” Taurasi said on NBCSN. “I’ll have a talk about it with coach, but, for right now, I’m settled with four, and I feel good about it.”

If Taurasi plays at Tokyo 2020, she can match Teresa Edwards‘ American record of playing in five Olympic basketball tournaments. (So can Sue Bird, who is two years older than Taurasi but hasn’t committed to a 2020 run.)

Taurasi can also take aim at the U.S. Olympic basketball scoring record of 488 points held by Lisa Leslie. Taurasi is in second place with 379 points after Rio. She would need to average 13.7 points per game to surpass Leslie in Tokyo, assuming the U.S. plays its usual eight games. Taurasi averaged a career-high 15.6 in Rio.

Taurasi will be 38 years old in 2020. The oldest U.S. Olympic basketball player of all time was Tamika Catchings, who turned 37 two weeks before the Rio Games. Catchings has retired.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Dawn Staley to coach U.S. women at Tokyo 2020

Julia Mancuso pushes past hip injury for final Olympic run

Getty Images
Leave a comment

When Julia Mancuso was 18 years old, a doctor told the ski racer that she needed to make a choice.

Continue competing (Mancuso had already been to an Olympics at age 17) or live a healthy life.

Mancuso was born with hip displaysia, a misalignment of hip bones that causes the joint to deteriorate faster than normal. The doctor told Mancuso she needed reconstructive surgery.

“I left crying and never went back to that doctor,” she said.

Mancuso went to the slopes instead.

In 15 years since that doctor’s visit, she put together one of the greatest Alpine careers in U.S. history — four Olympic medals (most by a U.S. female skier), five world championships medals and 36 World Cup podiums.

The right hip problems persisted. Mancuso did undergo hip surgery after her breakthrough Olympic giant slalom title in 2006.

The pain returned and, by 2015, became unbearable.

She underwent another hip surgery, this one much more complicated. The operation fixed cartilage damage, cleaned up bone spurs and put more anchors in her labrum because of a slight tear with doctors warning that her hip would probably be 90 percent of what it was, according to The Associated Press.

Mancuso spent six months on crutches. When she returns to the World Cup circuit this fall, Mancuso will have gone more than two and a half years between races.

“It’s really hard for me to walk normally,” Mancuso said last month. “A lot of people ask me why I’m doing it [skiing], because I can’t even walk. Why would I ski? The truth is, skiing is way easier. Skiing is fun because it is easy, and my body loves it. My body loves to ski, and my body needs to ski. … It improves my quality of life.”

Because of her hip, Mancuso said PyeongChang will be her fifth and final Olympics, should she make it there. She might not compete beyond next season.

The U.S. women’s speed team is deep — Lindsey Vonn, World Cup podium finishers Laurenne Ross, Jackie Wiles and Stacey Cook, the young Breezy Johnson. Even Mikaela Shiffrin dabbles. A maximum of four women per nation can start an Olympic race.

The super combined, where Mancuso earned silver and bronze medals at the last two Olympics, appears to be her best shot.

Mancuso is nothing if not dedicated, evidenced by Instagram Stories workout diaries. This complements her laid-back lifestyle, spending half her time in Fiji with her husband of five months and much of the other half in Maui.

She already has post-PyeongChang plans, to honeymoon in Tonga and dive with whales.

Before that, Mancuso hopes to have one more surprise Olympic season.

In 2006, she made her first World Cup podium two weeks before the Torino Winter Games, then won the giant slalom in Torino.

In 2010, she took silver in the Vancouver downhill and super combined despite making zero World Cup podiums in the previous two years.

In 2014, Mancuso snagged combined bronze thanks to the fastest downhill run in Sochi. That came during a season where her best World Cup finish was seventh.

Just making the Olympic team would mean history. No U.S. woman has competed in five Winter Games. Mancuso, halfpipe snowboarder Kelly Clark and cross-country skier Kikkan Randall can become the first.

Mancuso could also become the oldest female Olympic Alpine medalist.

“I’m excited to put my biggest and last effort into these next Olympics,” Mancuso said, “and then see what happens.”

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Bode Miller off U.S. ski roster, but has invitation to race