Usain Bolt

Usain Bolt recovers to beat Justin Gatlin in Zurich; Diamond League recap (video)

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Usain Bolt wasn’t dominant, but he didn’t need to be. The six-time Olympic champion came from behind, as usual, to beat a field that included Justin Gatlin at a Diamond League meeting in Zurich on Thursday.

Bolt won in 9.90 seconds, overcoming countryman Nickel Ashmeade (9.94) and Gatlin (9.96) over the final 50 meters. Bolt and Gatlin went gold-silver at the World Championships in Moscow earlier this month, where Bolt won in 9.77 to Gatlin’s 9.85.

“I wasn’t as fit,” Bolt told Swiss broadcaster SRF Sport. “The more the season goes, the more tired I get. … I’m just trying to get through the season injury free.”

Bolt’s reaction time — .186 — was the slowest in the field of nine. Ashmeade burst out in .123.

Bolt’s pre-race antics included a Bruce Lee-type display of hand-waving martial arts. After he won, Bolt threw his congratulatory flowers into the crowd, over his back wedding style, and signed autographs. Some fans held up a sign offering free chocolate to Bolt. It is not known if Bolt took them up on the request.

Bolt is expected to race in the Diamond League finale in Brussels, Belgium, on Sept. 6.

“I have to go and prepare, see what I can to do improve my start,” Bolt said.

Other notable results from Zurich:

Shelly-Ann Fraser-Pryce, just as dominant as Bolt in the women’s sprints, won the 200 meters with ease in 22.40. The field was missing Olympic champion Allyson Felix, out for the rest of the season with a hamstring injury. Murielle Ahoure, second to Fraser-Pryce at worlds, was second again in Zurich, in 22.66.

In the men’s 400, world champion LaShawn Merritt got the better of Grenadian rival Kirani James again, 44.13 to 44.32, as they went one-two.

American David Oliver backed up his world title by beating a world-class field again in the 110-meter hurdles despite getting hit with a piece of a broken hurdle from another runner. Oliver, who failed to make the 2012 Olympic team, crossed first in 13.12 seconds, leading a one-two-three U.S. finish with Ryan Wilson (13.24) and Jason Richardson (13.26) just behind. The Olympic champion and world record holder, Aries Merritt had another disappointing showing, getting sixth in 13.34, his same placement at worlds.

South African Caster Semenya, she of the gender controversy in 2009 and 2010, ran a season’s best in the 800 meters, 2:01.83, but it was only good enough for seventh. Semenya, the 2009 world champion, has battled injury this season and didn’t run a time fast enough to qualify for worlds.

World silver medalist Nick Symmonds won the 800 in 1:43.56. The race was missing Olympic champion and world record holder Kenyan David Rudisha and the man who clipped Symmonds in Moscow, Ethiopian Mohammed Aman.

In the women’s 5,000, Ethiopian Olympic and world champion Meseret Defar (14:32.83) held off countrywoman Tirunesh Dibaba (14:34.82), the Olympic and world champion in the 10,000, in what was reported to be the first time in seven years.

Ukrainian high jump world champion Bohdan Bondarenko won with ease, but he failed in an attempt to break Javier Sotomayor‘s 20-year-old world record for the third time this summer.

Security measures taken for Missy Franklin at Cal

McKayla Maroney: I would have starved at Olympics without Larry Nassar

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McKayla Maroney said she thought she “would have starved at the Olympics” in 2012 if Larry Nassar didn’t bring her food.

“Your coaches are just always watching you and wanting to keep you skinny,” Maroney said in an interview with Savannah Guthrie that will air in full on an hourlong “Dateline” special Sunday at 7 p.m. ET. “There’s just other things about the culture that are also messed up that he used against us.”

Past U.S. national team coordinators Bela and Martha Karolyi also gave interviews for the Dateline special “Silent No More.”

Maroney laughed when she said Nassar bought her a loaf of bread.

Her comments were shown on TODAY on Thursday, less than a day after her 2012 Olympic champion teammate Jordyn Wieber testified at a U.S. Senate subcommittee hearing to discuss the roles of national governing bodies — like USA Gymnastics — in protecting athletes following the Nassar case.

“We couldn’t smile or laugh in training,” Wieber said at the hearing. “We were even afraid to eat too much in front of our coaches, who were pressured to keep us thin.”

Maroney, Wieber and other U.S. national team gymnasts had personal coaches and convened multiple times per year at the Karolyi ranch in Texas for national team camps. Wieber’s personal coach, John Geddert, was the 2012 Olympic team coach.

Geddert was suspended by USA Gymnastics in January and is facing a criminal investigation after Nassar, who molested girls at Geddert’s gym in Michigan, was sentenced to 40 to 125 years in prison on Jan. 24. Geddert said he had “zero knowledge” of Nassar’s crimes.

“Our athletes, like McKayla, are the heart and soul of USA Gymnastics, and every effort has been made to support our athletes’ development and provide the opportunities for them to achieve their dreams.” USA Gymnastics said in a statement to NBC News.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.

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With USOC in turmoil, athletes testify about sex-abuse cases

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The question sex-abuse victim Craig Maurizi would like to ask U.S. Olympic leaders is simple and searing: “How can you sleep at night?”

Every bit as perplexing: How to make sure this doesn’t happen again?

The figure skater was one of four Olympic-sports athletes who testified to a Senate subcommittee Wednesday about abuse they suffered while training and competing under the purview of the U.S. Olympic Committee and the national sports organizations that controlled their Olympic dreams.

Their testimony provided yet another reminder of the way leaders at the USOC, US Figure Skating, USA Gymnastics and other federations failed to protect them over a span of decades.

At a USOC board meeting held later in the day, acting CEO Susanne Lyons outlined a six-part “Athlete Action Safety Plan” the federation is developing as a response to the abuse cases.

But the abuse victims, including Olympic gymnasts Jordyn Wieber and Jamie Dantzscher and speed skater Bridie Farrell, cast doubt on the USOC’s motivation to solve this problem.

Wieber, who won a gold medal in 2012, is among the roughly 200 athletes who have detailed abuse by team doctor Larry Nassar, who is in prison for molesting athletes on the U.S. gymnastics team and at Michigan State.

“After many people came forward and said Larry Nassar had abused them, I didn’t get a phone call from anyone at the USOC asking anything until after I gave a victim-impact statement,” Wieber said, recalling the emotional week in a Michigan courtroom that spotlighted the depth of the abuse scandal. “If you’re not currently a competing athlete, you’re not really relevant. They don’t really care anymore.”

The USOC is in search of a new CEO — someone to replace Scott Blackmun, who resigned with health problems in February.

When Blackmun resigned, the USOC announced a number of initiatives that mirrored the six-part plan Lyons described Wednesday.

It includes more funding for abuse victims and a review of the governance structure of the USOC and the 47 national governing bodies, whose sports make up the Olympics.

The USOC has also doubled its funding — to $3.1 million a year — for the U.S. Center for SafeSport, which opened last year.

Two months ago, the center responded to Maurizi’s call about a four-decade-old abuse case that US Figure Skating swept under the rug when he first reported it 20 years ago.

“When I think back to my particular situation, there’s just no way that dozens, if not hundreds, of people around the ice rink didn’t know what was going on,” he said. “Five-hour meetings in the office with a 15-year-old boy? That’s ridiculous. So, my question would be: How do you live with yourself? … How can you sleep at night?”

Leaders at the USOC, USA Gymnastics and Michigan State could be forced to answer those questions May 22, which is the date the Senate subcommittee has scheduled its next hearing on the sex-abuse cases.

It’s doubtful the USOC will have a new CEO by then, though it’s becoming clear it needs a well-articulated path forward through a devastating 12 months for Olympic athletes and the organizations that are supposed to protect them.

Max Siegel, the CEO of USA Track and Field, said commercial partners are hesitant to strike deals under the current climate.

“It’s an indication to me that it’s impacting the commercial viability of the business, and it’s a reflection of the societal challenges we face,” he said.

He said he was not opposed to a rethinking of the relationship between the USOC and NGBs, which have long valued their independence as the training grounds for Olympic athletes. The USOC has often positioned itself as an umbrella organization — a mere bystander when it comes to day-to-day operation of the sports.

“It’s not always clear what role we should be playing,” said Lyons, who attended the hearings in Washington. “Sometimes, athletes fall between the cracks a bit when they have issues with NGBs.”

Farrell served up the only concrete proposal in the more than two hours of testimony to the Senate subcommittee.

She would like to see more athletes — closer to 50 percent — placed on NGB boards. She’d also like to see retired athletes given a chance to serve.

The USOC appears amenable to that suggestion; one of its reforms is to see that athletes have a louder voice in decisions that impact them.

When asked what she would say to the leaders, Farrell said she would make one simple request:

“Take our names out, take our pictures out, and put their kids’ names and pictures in there, and see if it makes a difference,” she said. “Let them know there are thousands of people looking at them, as they should be, for missing the opportunity.”

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MORE: McKayla Maroney speaks publicly for first time since Nassar case