Andy Phillips

Former U.S. Alpine skier Andy Phillips stars for University of Utah football team

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U.S. Alpine skiing fans might take a particular interest in the University of Utah this season following its 30-26 opener win over Utah State on Thursday night.

The Utes’ standout was kicker Andy Phillips, a former U.S. Alpine skier who had never played competitive football before the opening kickoff. The redshirt freshman went 3-for-3 on extra points and on field goals, connecting from 45, 19 and 38 yards out.

The final two kicks came in the fourth quarter, putting Utah ahead and icing the game with 19 seconds left. He also converted an onside kick and earned the game ball, according to

“Oh man, what a thriller,” he told the Deseret News. “It’s just an honor being out there with these guys. These guys fight and they have a lot of faith in me.”

Think he felt pressure? Perhaps not. Phillips, 24, was an accomplished skier, having grown up on the slopes in Utah and spending five years on the U.S. Ski Team into 2011. Phillips earned a pair of third-place finishes in Nor-Am Cup races (2007, 2010) and was fifth in the slalom at the 2007 World Junior Championships.

Phillips also grew up playing soccer, easing the transition when he walked on in 2012.

“He’s a downhill racer,” Utah coach Kyle Whittingham told the Deseret News. “You talk about toughness. He’s got some wipeouts on YouTube that are unbelievable.”

Phillips detailed to the newspaper how he picked up football after he decided to stop skiing:

“It actually all started with a family Thanksgiving football game where my brother and I were trying to beat each other out for longest field goal,” said Phillips. “Then all of a sudden a New Year’s resolution came that I should make a Pac-12 team and try and be a kicker. So I worked my guts out and (Utah special teams) coach (Jay) Hill gave me an opportunity and I just jumped on it.”

Phillips told Hill that he always wanted to play football and was given a shot last fall. He impressed Hill by having a “good pop” on the ball when he connected with it. In the spring, Hill said Phillips went through a period of refinement as they honed in on his technique.

Whittingham told ESPN he put as much pressure as he could on Phillips in preseason practice to simulate game situations.

“Whether it’s, Andy, if you make this kick, we’re not running. If we miss it, we’re running eight gassers or whatever the case may be, then, he’s responded in those situations,” he said.

Phillips said he gets the same thrill playing football as he did ski racing, but there is one very noticeable difference.

“Probably everyone just showering together,” he joked to ESPN. “In skiing, you travel with an elite group of people, 10 or 15 at the max, and so you’re in your own private place, in your own world. Here, everything’s exposed in the locker room.”

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Six more Olympic medalists stripped in Beijing 2008 retests

BEIJING - AUGUST 08:  The Olympic flame is lit by Li Ning, former Olympic gymnast for China, during the Opening Ceremony for the 2008 Beijing Summer Olympics at the National Stadium on August 8, 2008 in Beijing, China.  (Photo by Jonathan Ferrey/Getty Images)
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LAUSANNE, Switzerland (AP) — Nine more athletes, including six medal winners, have been retroactively disqualified from the 2008 Beijing Olympics after failing retests of their doping samples.

The International Olympic Committee announced the decisions on Wednesday in the latest sanctions imposed on athletes whose stored samples came back positive after being retested with improved methods.

Four athletes from former Soviet countries were stripped of silver medals, and two of bronze medals. The medals were in weightlifting, wrestling and steeplechase.

The IOC stores doping samples for 10 years to allow them to be reanalyzed when enhanced techniques become available.

The IOC recorded a total of 98 positive cases in recent resting of samples from Beijing and the 2012 London Olympics.

VIDEO: Yao Ming reflects on Beijing Olympics

Rory McIlroy says Olympic participation still ‘complicated,’ ‘difficult’

HAINAN ISLAND, CHINA - NOVEMBER 23:  Graeme McDowell (R) and Rory McIlroy of Ireland walk behind a flag bearer during the Opening Ceremony of the Omega Mission Hills World Cup at the Mission Hills' Blackstone Course on November 23, 2011 in Hainan Island, China.  (Photo by Ian Walton/Getty Images)
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Rory McIlroy has said he was proven wrong about golf’s place in the Olympics, but that doesn’t necessarily mean he’s keen on the 2020 Tokyo Games after skipping Rio.

The four-time major champion was asked Wednesday if he had any plans to play in the next Olympics and called it a “tough question.”

“The participation in the Olympics for me, it’s just a little more complicated I feel for me than some other people from where I’m from and the whole politics of the thing,” McIlroy said. “It’s a difficult subject for me.”

McIlroy is from Northern Ireland, which does not have a separate delegation at the Olympics. That led to a scrutinized decision for McIlroy, who had to choose in 2014 between representing Great Britain and Ireland for golf’s Olympic return in Rio.

McIlroy opted for Ireland, which he represented at the World Cup of Golf in 2009 and 2011.

“I don’t know whether it’s been because the World Cup has been in Brazil and I’ve been thinking a couple of years down the line,” McIlroy reportedly said in June 2014. “Thinking about all the times that I played as an amateur for Ireland and as a boy and everything, I think for me it’s the right decision to play for Ireland in 2016.”

Golf’s place in the Olympics is not guaranteed beyond 2020, so Tokyo may be McIlroy’s last opportunity.

“Four years’ time is a long ways away, so we’ll see what happens,” McIlroy said Wednesday. “Right now, I’ll concentrate on the 16 majors that we have between now and then and try to get a few more of those and go from there.”

MORE: Tim Finchem eyes Olympic golf change in 2020