Jennie Finch

Jennie Finch learned of IOC vote while leading softball camp with 400 girls

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Two-time Olympic softball pitcher Jennie Finch checked her phone during a lunch break Sunday and found out her sport was denied re-entry into the Olympics.

“Devastated,” Finch said. “Crushed.”

What came next wasn’t easy, either.

Finch put her phone away and returned to the Jennie Finch Softball Camp at James Madison University in Harrisonburg, Va., where a group out of 400 total camp goers waited. Many had been asking “nonstop” about the vote.

The International Olympic Committee voted wrestling into the 2020 and 2024 Olympics over squash and a joint baseball-softball bid.

“Lots of disappointment on the softball field,” Finch said in a phone interview Monday morning, adding this message she told the camp members, as young as third-graders: “There’s two things you can always control, attitude and effort. Keep playing, keep pushing, keep growing our game.”

On Saturday, Finch spread to the camp the good news of Tokyo winning the 2020 Olympics. She hoped that the winning country where the sport is popular — Japan won the 2008 Olympic softball title over the U.S. — would enhance baseball-softball’s chances in the eyes of the IOC members Sunday.

“It’s so tough because I’ve been able to experience so much and see our sport grow all over the world,” said Finch, who lost her voice a bit after the weekend camp. “It was an opportunity being taken away. We, of course, are going to keep having hope. But that hope was once again lost (Sunday).”

Finch said wrestling deserved to be in the Olympics but that there should be a place for baseball-softball, too. Currently, there is not. The Games have a maximum number of athletes (10,500).

Major League Baseball has not committed to stopping its season to send players to the Olympics.

Finch said she sees pros and cons of baseball and softball joining together to try and get back into the Olympics after both were dropped in 2005, with it taking effect starting with the 2012 Games.

“I go back and forth,” she said. “Unfortunately, I think there’s so much that goes on that the public doesn’t know much about. … When (softball) joined with baseball, they truly thought that would be their best opportunity.”

In announcing wrestling’s win Sunday, IOC president Jacques Rogge singled out baseball.

“Hopefully, baseball’s successful in the future,” were his last words in the announcement.

The World Baseball Softball Confederation (WBSC) will not give up hope of trying to get into the Olympics.

“The WBSC will continue working hard and will continue listening and learning from the IOC, so that baseball and softball can come under the Olympic umbrella to serve and strengthen the Olympic Movement, as our sport expands and globalizes further,” Riccardo Fraccari, the president of the International Baseball Federation, told Reuters.

Wrestling wins IOC vote in landslide

Aleec Harris victorious in 110m hurdles; Allyson Felix scratches 200m at USAs

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Aleec Harris stated that his goal for the weekend was to win a USA flag to give to his wife and son, who were watching his races from the stands.

He won the men’s 110m hurdles with a time of 13.24 seconds, despite a significant headwind of 1.7 meters per second at the USATF Outdoor Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

Aries Merritt, the 2012 Olympic champion in the event who had a kidney transplant two years ago, acknowledged the winds were “no joke.” He clocked 13.31, followed by Devon Allen in third with a time of 13.34. All three will race at the world championships later this summer in London.

In the women’s 200m, Deajah Stevens won with a convincing time of 22.30; Kimberlyn Duncan followed with 22.59 and Tori Bowie in third at 22.60.

Allyson Felix scratched the women’s 200m, choosing instead to focus on defending her world title in the 400m.

Ameer Webb edged Christian Coleman by 0.01 seconds in the men’s 200m, though both men will represent the U.S. at the world championships in London later this summer.

Evan Jager, the Olympic silver medalist, won the 3000m Steeplechase in a time of 8:16.88, marking his sixth national title.

In the men’s shot put, Olympic champ Ryan Crouser set a meet record of 74 feet, 3 ¾ inches – the longest throw in the world in almost 14 years. He’s aiming for the world record. 2016 silver medalist Joe Kovach finished second with a throw of 73-4.

Clayton Murphy, 800m bronze medalist in Rio, scratched the 800m after sustaining two sore hamstrings Saturday and will not be at the world championships. Donavan Brazier won in 1:44.14.

MORE: Matthew Centrowitz, after ‘rock bottom,’ glad with runner-up at USAs

Ashley Wagner, Gus Kenworthy, and U.S. women’s hockey team to appear in ESPN’s Body Issue

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Ashley Wagner, Gus Kenworthy, and members of the U.S. women’s hockey team are just some of the Olympians and 2018 Olympic hopefuls featured in ESPN The Magazine’s annual body issue, on newsstands July 7. In all, 23 athletes will be featured in this year’s edition.

U.S. hockey players Brianna Decker, Kacey Bellamy, Meghan Duggan, Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson, Monique Lamoureux-Morando and Alex Rigsby will join U.S. soccer player Julie Ertz and her husband, Philadelphia Eagles tight end Zach Ertz.

Danish tennis pro and two-time Olympian Caroline Wozniacki is also featured, among a number of NBA, MLB, and NFL players.

Novlene Williams-Mills, from Jamaica, will be the first breast cancer survivor to appear in the magazine. The four-time Olympian owns three silver medals and one bronze from the 4x400m relays.

The 2016 edition featured 19 athletes, 11 of whom were Olympians.

Photos, interviews, and videos will begin to roll out this week in anticipation of the release.

MORE: South Korea president calls for North Korea at PyeongChang Olympics