Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong yet to return stripped Olympic bronze medal

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Lance Armstrong, the International Olympic Committee wants its medal back.

The disgraced cyclist hasn’t given back the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, eight months after the IOC stripped him of it and ordered its return.

“We still do not have the medal back,” IOC vice president Thomas Bach said during the IOC’s session Monday, according to Reuters. “We will continue to work with the United States Olympic Committee to get this medal back as requested in our decision.

“This (the IOC’s January) decision has been communicated to Mr. Armstrong and the USOC. This decision has not been appealed neither by Mr. Armstrong, nor by the USOC and what we are lacking, sadly, is getting back the medal. Legally the case for the IOC is closed.”

Armstrong, a three-time Olympian, was stripped of his only Olympic medal three months after the International Cycling Union took away his record seven Tour de France titles from 1999-2005.

Armstrong finished third in the time trial at the 2000 Olympics, behind one of his longtime U.S. Postal Service Team members, Russian Viatcheslav Ekimov, and German rival Jan Ullrich.

According to court documents, another stripped Tour winner, Floyd Landis, said Ekimov received blood transfusions with other USPS team members during the 2004 Tour de France.

In June, Ullrich admitted to blood doping during his career but has not been stripped of his 1997 Tour de France title.

“I am no better than Armstrong, but no worse either,” Ullrich said.

The fourth-place finisher from that 2000 Olympic time trial, Spain’s Abraham Olano, was fired from his technical director role with the Vuelta a Espana Grand Tour in July after his name came up in French senate report of cyclists who doped in the 1998 Tour de France.

The fifth-place finisher from that race, France’s Laurent Jalabert, acknowledged a positive drug test from the 1998 Tour de France in July.

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It’s over: a low-key Games on a far more human scale

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea — The 2018 Winter Olympics shivered Sunday to a close, surely defined by cold and wind but destined — just as in Seoul 30 years before — to mark a key chapter in history on the Korean peninsula.

NBCOlympics.com: Sights and Sounds from the 2918 Olympics Closing Ceremony

These Games are likely to be recalled as an inflection point in Olympic history, too. After logistical dramas and more at Rio 2016 and Sochi 2014, the Olympic scene needed a Games at which the venues were built, the buses ran on time, security was subtle, the volunteers were super-friendly — organizationally, everything more or less just worked — and the spotlight shone on the athletes and their stories of inspiration.

That’s what PyeongChang delivered.

A low-key Games on a far more human scale.

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More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

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The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy: