Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong yet to return stripped Olympic bronze medal

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Lance Armstrong, the International Olympic Committee wants its medal back.

The disgraced cyclist hasn’t given back the bronze medal he won at the 2000 Sydney Olympics, eight months after the IOC stripped him of it and ordered its return.

“We still do not have the medal back,” IOC vice president Thomas Bach said during the IOC’s session Monday, according to Reuters. “We will continue to work with the United States Olympic Committee to get this medal back as requested in our decision.

“This (the IOC’s January) decision has been communicated to Mr. Armstrong and the USOC. This decision has not been appealed neither by Mr. Armstrong, nor by the USOC and what we are lacking, sadly, is getting back the medal. Legally the case for the IOC is closed.”

Armstrong, a three-time Olympian, was stripped of his only Olympic medal three months after the International Cycling Union took away his record seven Tour de France titles from 1999-2005.

Armstrong finished third in the time trial at the 2000 Olympics, behind one of his longtime U.S. Postal Service Team members, Russian Viatcheslav Ekimov, and German rival Jan Ullrich.

According to court documents, another stripped Tour winner, Floyd Landis, said Ekimov received blood transfusions with other USPS team members during the 2004 Tour de France.

In June, Ullrich admitted to blood doping during his career but has not been stripped of his 1997 Tour de France title.

“I am no better than Armstrong, but no worse either,” Ullrich said.

The fourth-place finisher from that 2000 Olympic time trial, Spain’s Abraham Olano, was fired from his technical director role with the Vuelta a Espana Grand Tour in July after his name came up in French senate report of cyclists who doped in the 1998 Tour de France.

The fifth-place finisher from that race, France’s Laurent Jalabert, acknowledged a positive drug test from the 1998 Tour de France in July.

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2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships to be in San Jose

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The 2018 U.S. Figure Skating Championships, the final competition to determine the Pyeongchang Olympic team, will be in San Jose, California, at the SAP Center, concluding Jan. 7.

It appears to be the earliest the U.S. Figure Skating Championships will end in an Olympic year in at least 50 years.

The competition will be broadcast live on NBC and streamed live on Icenetwork.com.

San Jose previously hosted the U.S. Championships in 1996 and 2012, but it has never hosted in an Olympic year.

Sochi Olympian Polina Edmunds is from San Jose and figures to receive a boost of crowd support. Edmunds, 18, begins classes at nearby Santa Clara University next month.

The January 2017 U.S. Championships will be in Kansas City. The international figure skating season starts next month, with Skate America kicking off the Grand Prix season in October.

Recent Nationals host cities in Olympic years were Boston in 2014 and Spokane, Washington, in 2010.

MORE: Ashley Wagner, Gracie Gold headline Skate America

Fiji Olympic rugby coach given 3 acres of land, special name

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 11:  Gold medalists Ro Dakuwaqa of Fiji and Fiji head coach Ben Ryan celebrate after the medal ceremony for the Men's Rugby Sevens on Day 6 of the Rio 2016 Olympics at Deodoro Stadium on August 11, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)
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Olympic coaches don’t receive gold medals. Fiji Olympic men’s rugby coach Ben Ryan may have gotten something better anyway.

Ryan’s reward for guiding Fiji to its first Olympic medal in any sport — gold in rugby sevens’ Olympic debut — included three acres of land in Fiji and a new name, Ratu Peni Raiyani Latianara, according to Fijian reports.

Ryan, a London native, is stepping down as coach of the Fijian team. The 44-year-old coached the team for three years after leading the England national sevens team for six years.

MORE: Fiji wins nation’s first Olympic medal