Max Aaron

Max Aaron wins U.S. International Figure Skating Classic

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U.S. champion Max Aaron began his season with a win, but he has plenty of work ahead of him.

Aaron, 21, posted a total score of 239.21 to take the U.S. International Figure Skating Classic in Salt Lake City on Friday night. But his planned free skate with three quadruple jumps didn’t go smoothly.

Aaron popped his first into a double toe loop, put his hand down on a quad salchow and spun out of a landing on another quad salchow.

Still, it was easily enough to beat three other Americans in the absence of Olympic champion Evan Lysacek, who pulled out of the event Monday.

Stephen Carriere (225.54), Josh Farris (206.56) and Grant Hochstein (191.91) followed Aaron in the standings (full results below). None landed a clean quad. Carriere, who was 10th at nationals, fell on a quad toe loop. Farris, the world junior champion, sat down a triple axel.

Gold, Davis/White lead after short programs

Aaron goes into the Olympic season as one of the top contenders to make the two-man Olympic team at nationals in Boston in January.

Lysacek hasn’t competed since the 2010 Olympics. U.S. silver and bronze medalists Ross Miner and Jeremy Abbott also did not compete in Salt Lake City.

Next up is Skate America in Detroit from Oct. 18-20. Aaron, Lysacek and 2012 U.S. silver medalist Adam Rippon are the Americans entered there.

Canadians Kirsten Moore-Towers and Dylan Moscovitch won the pairs competition for the second straight year.

They extended a six-point lead from Thursday’s short program to win by 13 points over 2012 U.S. champions Caydee Denney and John Coughlin. Moore-Towers and Moscovitch were fourth at the World Championships in March.

2013 U.S. champions Marissa Castelli and Simon Shnapir fell from second after the short program into fourth behind another American pair, Tarah Kayne and Daniel O’Shea.

It’s early, but Denney and Coughlin got an early boost going into the Olympic season. Two U.S. pairs teams will qualify for the Olympics at nationals in January.

Denney and Coughlin, Castelli and Shnapir and Felicia Zhang and Nathan Bartholomay, who were last Friday, are the U.S. teams entered in Skate America.

1. Max Aaron (USA) 239.21
2. Stephen Carriere (USA) 225.54
3. Josh Farris (USA) 206.56
4. Grant Hochstein (USA) 191.91
5. Christopher Caluza (PHI) 185.33
6. Michael Christian Martinez (PHI) 183.04
7. Andrei Rogozine (CAN) 168.92
8. Stanislav Samohin (ISR) 163.71
9. Oleksii Bychenko (ISR) 162.71
10. Charles Pao (TPE) 95.18

1. Moore-Towers/Moscovitch (CAN) 201.30
2. Denney/Coughlin (USA) 188.47
3. Kayne/O’Shea (USA) 167.27
4. Castelli/Shnapir (USA) 165.91
5. Lawrence/Swiegers (CAN) 155.00
6. Davidovich/Krasnapolsky (ISR) 133.07
7. Zhang/Bartholomay (USA) 130.20

U.S. women’s figure skater has mime coach

Watch ‘Race’ film about Jesse Owens teaser video

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“Race,” a film about Olympic sprint legend Jesse Owens, will hit theaters Feb. 19.

Owens, who won four gold medals at the Berlin 1936 Olympics in the face of Nazi Germany, is played by Stephan James in the film.

Jason Sudeikis and Jeremy Irons are also in the cast for the Focus Features film, according to reports. Sudeikis will reportedly play Owens’ coach, Larry Snyder. Irons will play Avery Brundage, then the president of the U.S. Olympic Committee.

MORE TRACK AND FIELD: Angelina Jolie discusses her decision to use Jesse Owens in ‘Unbroken’

Meryl Davis, Charlie White wait for right feeling for possible return

NEW YORK, NY - OCTOBER 13:  (L-R) Olympic gold medalists and airweave ambassadors Charlie White and Meryl Davis formally open Rockefeller Center's iconic ice rink on October 13, 2015 in New York City.  (Photo by Astrid Stawiarz/WireImage)
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NEW YORK — When Meryl Davis sees that photo, that tight feeling returns.

The picture, taken by a U.S. Figure Skating team leader, captured Davis and ice dance partner Charlie White, as they waited in between a warm-up and one of their programs at the Iceberg Skating Palace at the Sochi Olympics.

Davis and White haven’t competed since becoming the first U.S. Olympic ice dance champions on Feb. 17, 2014. They’ve continued to skate in the 603 days since, in shows and at events such as the opening of The Rink at Rockefeller Center on Tuesday morning.

How often do they think about returning to competition?

“Only when you guys [the media] are asking,” White said Tuesday. “I don’t mean to be flippant. I literally don’t think about it.”

But they feel it, such as the nervousness as spectators inside the Shanghai Sports Center on March 25, watching their former peers perform the World Championships short dance.

“We still felt really invested in the competition,” Davis said.

Or when Davis comes across that picture from Sochi.

White, too, remembers that tight feeling just before the biggest competition of their lives.

“Full-on, you’re thinking to yourself like, if I run away right now, how mad will everyone be,” said White, seated to the left of Davis, his ice dance partner of nearly 20 years, at the Rock Center Café on Tuesday afternoon. “You’re so terrified because of what the moment represents. You can’t escape it. It’s like the Eye of Sauron [from “Lord of the Rings”].”

Davis and White announced in March what many suspected, that they would not compete in the 2015-16 season.

The decision came easily.

“It wasn’t, like, an answer we had to search for,” White said Tuesday. “It wasn’t something where we had to sit down and even have a conversation. We just knew.”

Their stance about the future has not changed. Davis and White are open to returning, if the feeling is right.

“We’re just not on that clock right now, and it’s really nice,” Davis said. “I think we’ll just wait for it to just pop up one day. We’ll just wait for an epiphany.”

White said they will sense it together, if and when it comes.

“The feeling that we need to have to be able to get onto the ice and push through that brick wall every single day,” he said, joking that feeling occured about 15 times per day leading into Sochi but now passes about once every 20 days.

What’s clear is that Davis and White would not leave a run for their third Olympics to the last minute.

White said they would probably have to return no later than halfway through the 2016-17 season if the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Games are their target.

Many athletes say they would need a full season of competition going into an Olympic year, but that’s not a requirement for Davis and White.

“Especially with the fact that we’re still skating, we’re still in front of people, we’ve skated together for 20 years,” White said. “Our speed, our power, explosion, it’s not going anywhere for 10 years.”

White, who turns 28 on Oct. 24, then paused and chuckled.

“Maybe seven years,” he said.

Longtime training partners and Canadian rivals Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir, the Vancouver 2010 gold medalists and Sochi silver medalists, also haven’t competed since the Olympics. They reportedly plan to decide if they’ll come back before the 2016-17 season.

Ice dance evolved during the couples’ break. In Shanghai, France’s Gabriella Papadakis, then 19, and Guillaume Cizeron, then 20, became the youngest World champions in the event in 40 years.

Davis and White watched the Worlds free dance on March 27 on a tablet while in a car en route to a hotel. They saw Papadakis and Cizeron jump from fourth after the short dance to first to supplant U.S. Olympians Madison Chock and Evan Bates.

“We’re not that far removed from being out there with them,” White said.

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