Andy Murray

Scotland could have its own team at Rio 2016 Olympics

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Imagine if Andy Murray won Olympic gold at Wimbledon last year … for Scotland.

Scotland could vote for its independence next September. If it does, it will take steps to establish its own Olympic team for Rio de Janeiro in 2016.

“We’re comfortable and assured Scotland will have its own Olympic and Paralympic team. It will bring many benefits,” Scotland sports minister Shona Robison told the BBC.

Scottish athletes helped Great Britain to fourth place in the overall medal standings at the 2012 Olympics, winning around 18 percent of Team GB’s medals, according to The Associated Press.

The Guardian reported that support among voters for independence is as low as 35 percent, but that 40 to 50 percent of voters could be undecided or willing to switch sides.

The most high-profile Scottish Olympians were Murray, track cyclist Chris Hoy (now retired) and swimmer Michael Jamieson. Hoy won seven medals over four Olympics — six gold — making him the most decorated British Olympian of all time.

Murray is the No. 3 ranked men’s singles tennis player in the world. The next highest British player is No. 152.

Keep in mind golf, which returns to the Olympics in 2016, originated in Scotland. There are no Scottish men’s golfers in the top 60 in the Official World Golf Ranking, so having a separate Scottish team could open up spots for the likes of Martin Laird and Richie Ramsay. Team GB could also lose World No. 4 Rory McIlroy, who may compete for Ireland. McIlroy is from Northern Ireland.

The top-ranked British women’s golfer is Scottish. That’s No. 10 Catriona Matthew, 44, winner of the 2009 British Open. Britain otherwise has only one woman in the top 100.

Robison said Scotland meets the criteria for Scotland to be an Olympic nation: being an independent state recognized by the international community, having a solid sports structure and at least five national federations affiliated to international federations of Olympic sports.

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Tom Daley wins 10m platform gold at Worlds on final dive

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After missing out on the men’s 10m platform finals at the 2016 Rio Olympic Games, Great Britain’s Tom Daley won gold at the 2017 FINA Diving World Championships. Daley, who won bronze in the same event at the 2012 London Olympics won his last world championship 10m platform gold back in 2009 when he was just 15 years old.

Daley was awarded four 10’s on his final dive in Budapest, Hungary, beating China’s Chen Aisen – the reining 2016 Olympic champion in men’s 10m platform. The two divers tied on their last dive, both earning 106.20 points, but Daley, who had been in command after each of his dives on Saturday, beat Chen out for the top spot by 5.7 points.

Daley’s struggles in Rio were inexplicable. In the preliminary round, he scored 571.85 points, a personal best, and a score which would have won him gold at the 2012 London Olympic Games. However, in semifinal dives, Daley could not execute, finishing 18th in an event where only the top 12 advance to the finals.

Earlier in the day in Budapest, Daley, along with teammate Grace Reid, won silver in the mixed 3m springboard event. On Monday, in the men’s synchronized 10m platform, Daley and teammate Danie Goodfellow finished fourth.

The sole U.S. diver in the men’s 10m platform event in Budapest, David Dinsmore, finished sixth. Dinsmore who narrowly missed out on making his first Olympic team at the 2016 U.S. Olympic Diving Trials, won bronze in Budapest with teammate Krysta Palmer in the mixed team event.

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Froome all but seals 4th Tour de France win in Marseille

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MARSEILLE, France (AP) — Chris Froome has virtually sealed a fourth Tour de France victory on the penultimate stage, stamping his authority on the race in a time trial in Marseille streets.

Froome, the last rider to set off from the Stade Velodrome, finished third in the 22.5-kilometer stage won by Maciej Bodnar, and increased his overall lead.

Colombian rider Rigoberto Uran moved to second place in the general classification, 54 seconds behind Froome, after Frenchman Romain Bardet cracked and dropped to third overall, according to provisional results.

Only the largely ceremonial stage into Paris on the Champs-Elysees stands between Froome and his fourth triumph in five years.

The British rider from Team Sky also won cycling’s biggest race in 2013, 2015 and 2016. He did not win a single stage this year.

Froome, who was booed and whistled by fans at the Stade Velodrome when he went down the starting ramp, almost caught Bardet in the finale.

He was in control throughout, gaining time on his main rivals at all intermediate check points.

Bardet endured his first bad day after three grueling weeks, and reached his limits in the small climb up to Notre-Dame de la Garde cathedral.

Bardet salvaged a spot on the podium by one second, ahead of Mikel Landa of Spain.

Bardet had been second overall before the clock race, with an advantage of more than a minute over Landa. But the French rider melted in the heat on the twisting and technical time trial course.

He said, “I was in poor health and I paid for it, in cash.”

He added he felt his immune system starting to react after the last stage in the high Alps and “I didn’t feel well this morning.”

Twice a runner-up at the Giro d’Italia, Uran added another second-place finish at a Grand Tour on his resume but almost saw his hopes destroyed when he hit barriers as he entered the Velodrome, which hosted the start and finish of Stage 20. Uran managed to stay on his bike but lost precious time and finished 31 seconds off the pace.

Froome’s teammate, Michal Kwiatkowski, was second in the time trial, one second behind Bodnar.

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