Patrick Kane

USA Hockey Olympic teams will be announced during Winter Classic

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As in 2010, the 2014 U.S. men’s Olympic hockey roster will be announced at the Winter Classic on New Year’s Day. In a change, the women’s team will also be named at the NHL’s annual outdoor game.

The men’s team will be announced at the conclusion of the Jan. 1 matchup between the Toronto Maple Leafs and Detroit Red Wings at The Big House at the University of Michigan. The women’s team will be named during the second intermission.

USA Hockey general manager David Poile also said half or more of the men’s Olympic hockey team will be veterans from the young 2010 squad that defied expectations to win a silver medal.

Forwards Patrick Kane and Zach Parise are expected to lead Team USA. The starting goalie is up for debate. Ryan Miller was spectacular in 2010, but his stats in the NHL have regressed since as he enters his age-33 season with the Sabres. There’s also Jonathan Quick, who led the Kings to the Stanley Cup in 2012, and Jimmy Howard, who is coming off two strong seasons with the Red Wings.

Both the U.S. men and women lost gold-medal games to Canada at the 2010 Olympics. The men will go into the Sochi Games as underdogs again. The U.S. and Canada are not historically strong at Winter Games staged in Europe or Asia.

Poile told reporters at the U.S. Olympic media summit in Park City, Utah, he believes the U.S. is one of four or five teams that legitimately has a shot to win gold in Sochi. The medal prediction service Infostrada has Russia winning gold, Finland silver and the Czech Republic bronze.

The U.S. women appear destined for a rematch with the rival Canadians in Sochi for gold. The Americans beat Canada (in Canada) for the World Championship in April.

U.S., Canada to get very familiar in leadup to Olympics

Zika won’t stop Olympics; only war has done that, historian says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - JULY 07:  A general view of the Christ The Redeemer statue atop the Corcovado on July 7, 2014 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
AP
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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — The world’s best known Olympic historian said Friday it will take something more destructive than the Zika virus to cancel the Rio de Janeiro Olympics.

“Historically, the only times the Games have been cancelled is in war — World War I and World War II,” David Wallechinsky told the Associated Press. “Other than that, nothing has done it.”

Brazil is the epicenter of the rapidly spreading mosquito-borne Zika virus, which is also generating rumors that South America’s first Games may be called off instead of opening on Aug. 5.

Researchers have linked the virus to a birth defect that can leave newborns with long-lasting health and developmental problems.

Brazil’s Sports Minister George Hilton issued a statement saying that canceling the Games “is not in discussion,” and Rio organizers and the International Olympic Committee have repeatedly shot down the notion it’s even being considered.

Wallechinsky, president of the International Society of Olympic Historians, said the only similar case was the 2014 Youth Olympics in Nanjing, China, when three athletes from west Africa were banned from competing over fears they had contracted the Ebola virus and the subsequent possibility of it spreading.

“That’s the only time that disease has ever entered into it,” he said.

The 1916 Olympics were called off during World War I, and four Games — two summer and two winter — were cancelled between 1940 and 1944. Two Summer Olympics were hit by partial boycotts in 1980 and 1984.

Wallechinsky said it was too late to move the games from Rio.

“A lot of money has been put into this; the athletes, the infrastructure,” he said. “It’s pretty late to move the Games so I think they’ll go forward.”

Brazil is spending at least $10 billion to prepare for the Games. Add to that, billions spent on television rights, and maybe just as much on sponsorship, advertising across 28 sport federations, and the more than 200 nations that participate.

“There would be a lot of lawsuits,” Wallechinsky said. “It would be a dream event for lawyers.”

The Zika virus adds to other problems with South America’s first Olympics, including water pollution in Rio’s venues for sailing, rowing, canoeing, triathlon and open-water swimming , and deep cuts of almost 30 percent to keep a $2 billion operating budget in balance.

Only about half of the domestic tickets for the game have been sold, and organizers fear the Zika outbreak could scare off foreign tourists — particularly Americans.

Janice Forsyth, an Olympic historian at Western University in Canada, predicted the Zika threat “is going to blow over.”

“But if it really catches on, then we’ve got a global concern that’s not just about the Olympics,” she said. “But it would have to be really extraordinary for the game to be cancelled. Even with threats of terrorism, the games still don’t get cancelled.”

Forsyth said the virus might even have beneficial impact on Rio’s preparations, distracting from other problems.

“In a sad way, maybe it’s a positive diversion from what is actually going on with the games,” she said. “A twist for games that seem to be constantly struggling.”

VIDEO: Rio Olympic venues timelapse

‘Race’ film clip of 1936 Olympic long jump (video)

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“Race,” a film about 1936 Olympic legend Jesse Owens‘ triumphs in the face of Nazi Germany, hits theaters Feb. 19.

In the above clip, Owens competes in long jump qualifying after receiving a tip from fellow jumper German Luz Long to avoid fouling on his last attempt to advance to the final.

Owens would then beat Long in the final, though the pair forged a friendship.

In other clips, Owens, played by Stephan James, speaks with his Ohio State coach, Larry Snyder, played by Jason Sudeikis. Watch that here.

Also, Owens discusses taking part in the Olympics amid racial prejudice in the U.S. Watch that here.

MORE: James discusses playing Owens in ‘Race’ | VIDEO: ‘Race’ trailer