Missy Franklin

Ryan Lochte, Missy Franklin, Katie Ledecky lead Golden Goggle nominees

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The 10th Golden Goggle Awards, honoring the year’s best in USA Swimming, will of course be the first without Michael Phelps on the ballot.

In his place, new American stars Missy Franklin and Katie Ledecky as well as former rival Ryan Lochte scattered the eight-award ballot announced Tuesday.

Phelps, who retired after the London Olympics, had been nominated for at least one award at every Golden Goggles dating to its first year in 2004.

Online voting is available here through Nov. 15. A percentage of the fan vote will count towards the final results, awarded at the Nov. 24 Golden Goggle Awards in Los Angeles.

The nominee list is as follows:

Breakout Performer of the Year

Jimmy Feigen — Won his first individual medal at a major international meet, silver in the 100 free at the World Championships.
Chase Kalisz — Won NCAA title in 400-yard individual medley, won U.S. title and world silver in 400 IM.
Simone Manuel — Became first U.S. woman, 18 or under, to swim 50 free in under 25 seconds.
Michael McBroom — Won silver in 800 free at first major international meet, becoming the only man to break an American record in 2013.

Perseverance Award

Eugene Godsoe — Won U.S. titles in the 50 and 100 fly and world silver in the 50 after missing 2012 Olympic team.
Elizabeth Pelton — Won two relay golds at World Championships after missing 2012 Olympic team.
David Plummer — Won U.S. titles in 50 and 100 back and world silver in the 100 back after missing 2012 Olympic team.
Megan Romano — Won six medals at World University Games, two relay golds at World Championships after missing 2012 Olympic team.

Coach of the Year

Rick DeMont — Star pupil: Matt Grevers
Bruce Gemmell — Star pupil: Katie Ledecky
Dave Salo — Star pupil: Haley Anderson
Todd Schmitz — Star pupil: Missy Franklin
Gregg Troy — Star pupil: Ryan Lochte

Relay Performance of the Year (all at World Championships)

Women’s 4x100m Free Relay — Romano comes from seven tenths of a second behind Australia on anchor to win in America record time.
Women’s 4x200m Free Relay — Ledecky leads off, Franklin comes from behind to pass Australia on anchor for a two-second win.
Men’s 4x200m Free Relay — U.S. wins by more than two seconds over Russia, its 10th straight win in a major international meet.
Women’s 4x100m Medley Relay — Franklin, Jessica HardyDana Vollmer and Romano close the meet by beating Australia by nearly two seconds.

Female Race of the Year (all World Championships finals)

Missy Franklin — 200 free – Gold in personal best 1:54.81, holding off world record holder Federica Pellegrini.
Katie Ledecky — 800 free – Gold in world record 8:13.86 (by two tenths), coming from behind to beat 2009 world champ Lotte Friis.
Katie Ledecky — 1500 free – Gold in world record 15:36.53 (by six seconds), beating Friis by two seconds.
Haley Anderson — open-water 5K – Out-touched open-water 10K world champion Poliana Okimoto by two seconds in 56:34.2.

Male Race of the Year (all World Championships finals)

Matt Grevers’ 100 back — Gold in 52.93, coming back from second at the turn and holding off U.S. teammate Plummer.
Ryan Lochte’s 200 back — Gold in 1:53.79, leading at every turn and winning by four tenths.
Ryan Lochte’s 200 IM — Gold in 1:54.98, coming from behind at 200 meters to win by 1.3 seconds.

Female Athlete of the Year

Haley Anderson — Won open-water 5K at World Championships after failing to make the U.S. team in her Olympic event, the 10K.
Missy Franklin — Became first woman to win six golds at a single World Championships.
Katie Ledecky — Won four golds at World Championships debut with two world records.

Male Athlete of the Year

Matt Grevers — Gold in the 100 backstroke, silver in the 50 backstroke at World Championships.
Ryan Lochte — Three golds, one silver at the World Championships.

German Olympic star swimmer retires after 2 U.S. stars call it quits

Nick Symmonds auctions body ad space for double 2012 amount

Nick Symmonds
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U.S. 800m runner Nick Symmonds‘ right shoulder is apparently twice as valuable as his left shoulder.

The two-time Olympian auctioned ad space on his body for a second straight Olympic summer, with the final bid at $21,800 for nine square inches on his right shoulder in an Ebay auction that ended Thursday afternoon.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere‘s Twitter account claimed the winning bid of 107 overall bids.

In 2012, Symmonds auctioned the same nine inches on his left shoulder for $11,100 to Hanson Dodge Creative, a marketing agency based in Milwaukee. Here’s what that temporary tattoo looked like.

Symmonds’ temporary tattoo was not visible during the 2012 Olympics or 2012 Olympic Trials, as rules mandate the advertisement is taped over in those events plus other IAAF competitions.

Symmonds, 32, finished fifth at the 2012 Olympics and second at the 2013 World Championships.

He was left off the 2015 World Championships roster, after winning the national title, after refusing to sign a USA Track and Field contract that required athletes to wear Nike-branded Team USA gear at team functions at Worlds.

Symmonds’ apparel sponsor has been Brooks since January 2014. He was previously a Nike-sponsored Oregon Track Club member for seven years.

MORE: Mother, son set to compete in same Olympics for first time

Karch Kiraly to remain U.S. women’s volleyball coach through 2020

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Karch Kiraly will continue as U.S. women’s volleyball team head coach through the 2020 Olympics, agreeing to a four-year contract renewal.

“It’s been a tremendous honor to lead this special group of intelligent, powerful, hard-working, dedicated women, and the great staff that supports them — and it’s a double honor to prepare for battle at the Rio Olympics, knowing we’ll have the opportunity to carry that work forward in the next quadrennial,” Kiraly said in a press release.

Kiraly, the only U.S. volleyball player to earn indoor and beach Olympic titles, took over after serving on Hugh McCutcheon‘s staff from 2009 through the 2012 Olympics, where the U.S. women took silver behind Brazil.

Kiraly then led the U.S. women to their first World or Olympic title in 2014. They are ranked No. 1 in the world ahead of China and Brazil.

The program has gone 50 years with zero Olympic golds and broke a 62-year World Championship drought in 2014.

Kiraly, 55, is set to become the first coach of multiple U.S. Olympic women’s volleyball teams since Terry Liskevych from 1988 through 1996.

MORE: U.S. women’s volleyball team inspired by tennis legend