Veronica Campbell-Brown

Veronica Campbell-Brown receives warning, no suspension from Jamaican track and field panel

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Jamaica’s most decorated Olympic champion is set to be cleared to compete, five months after failing a drug test.

A Jamaican track and field disciplinary panel issued a warning and no suspension to Veronica Campbell-Brown, 31 and a seven-time Olympic medalist, Wednesday night.

“The disciplinary committee has issued a ruling that Veronica Campbell-Brown has committed an anti-doping violation, contrary to IAAF Rule 32.2a,” the Jamaican Athletics Administrative Association said in a statement. “They have recommended that a reprimand without any period of ineligibility would be appropriate.”

The IAAF has to ratify the recommendation, according to the Jamaica Gleaner. The newspaper reported on Thursday that the ruling was unlikely to be upheld by the IAAF, citing at least two unnamed officials.

IAAF Rule 32.2a outlines what constitutes an anti-doping rule violation. It is 243 words long and can be found in the IAAF rule book here. The Jamaican panel ruled Campbell-Brown did not use the banned substance to enhance her performance.

Campbell-Brown tested positive for a banned diuretic on May 4. The positive test was first reported June 14. The drug was reportedly either Lasix (Furosemide) or Hydrochlorothiazide, similar substances that can be used as masking agents for performance-enhancing drugs.

The banned drug came from a cream that Campbell-Brown was using to treat a leg injury and which she had declared on her doping control form, according to Reuters, citing unnamed sources close to Jamaican track and field.

Campbell-Brown was provisionally suspended and has not competed since June. Another Jamaican sprinter, Steve Mullings, tested positive for Furosemide in 2011 and was banned for life. Mullings had tested positive before. This was Campbell-Brown’s first failed test.

Campbell-Brown has not made any public comments since the test came to light and missed the Jamaican National Championships and the World Championships. She was considered a medal contender in the 100 meters, 200 and 4×100 relay.

In June, an IAAF spokesman said Campbell-Brown’s case appeared to be a “lesser” offense of unintentional use. In July, the Times of London reported Campbell-Brown was expected to receive a six-month ban.

The standard ban for positive drug tests is two years, but under a “lesser” offense, just a warning is an option if the athlete can prove he or she ingested the substance without intent to enhance performance.

“Veronica is not a cheat,” read part of a statement sent to media by Campbell-Brown’s agent in June.

She effectively did serve a six-month ban given she sat out all summer competitions, and the next track and field season doesn’t pick up again until 2014.

Campbell-Brown was the first in a series of positive drug tests for sprinters this season that included American record holder Tyson Gay, former world record holder Asafa Powell and 2008 Olympic 100-meter silver medalist Sherone Simpson.

Gay, Powell and Simpson have not received their official suspensions yet but haven’t competed since their positive tests were first reported.

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John Shuster, 30 pounds lighter, rallies for 4th Olympic curling berth

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John Shuster is going to a fourth Olympics. It’s one more chance to prove Urban Dictionary wrong.

Shuster, 30 pounds lighter since his second straight Olympic failure in Sochi, led a team that beat Heath McCormick‘s squad at the U.S. Olympic Trials finals in Omaha on Saturday night.

Shuster, Tyler GeorgeMatt Hamilton and John Landsteiner lost the opener of a best-of-three finals series on Thursday.

They came back to deliver in a pair of must-win games, 9-4 on Friday night and 7-5 on Saturday, after spending each day at the Omaha Zoo.

The new-look Shuster — leaner and, at least this weekend, clutch — would astonish those who know him by scenes at the last two Olympics.

After taking bronze in 2006 as a role player, he led the last two U.S. Olympic teams to 2-7 records in 2010 and in 2014. Last place in Vancouver, where he was benched after an 0-4 start. Next to last place in Sochi.

After the last Olympics, the former bartender from Chisholm, Minn., was left off USA Curling’s 10-man high performance team.

He took it as motivation to get in shape.

Shuster, a father of a 2- and a 4-year-old who once said, “If I don’t have pizza three or four times a week, I’m not happy,” now totes meal replacement shakes. He’s starting to enjoy Olympic lifting.

Shuster, George, Hamilton and Landsteiner, all absent from that USA Curling high performance list, formed their own team. They became Team USA in their first season together and represented the Stars and Stripes at worlds in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Their results — fourth, third and fifth —  marked the best string of U.S. men’s or women’s finishes at that level in a decade.

Shuster is set to join Debbie McCormick as the only Americans to curl at four Olympics. The sport was part of the first Winter Games in 1924, then absent as a medal sport until 1998.

“I don’t think it’s about the four Olympics for me,” Shuster said on NBCSN. “What this is about — and what I’m about — is getting my teammates to now. I have two new Olympians on this team, and I know how special that is.”

George, the 35-year-old vice skip for Shuster, led a team that lost to Shuster in the 2010 Olympic Trials final. The liquor store manager from Duluth, Minn., is going to his first Winter Games.

As is the 28-year-old Hamilton, whose younger sister qualified for PyeongChang earlier Saturday.

Landsteiner, a 27-year-old corrosion engineer, played with Shuster since 2011, including in Sochi.

Alternate Joe Polo can go 12 years between Olympic appearances after taking bronze on that Torino team.

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MORE: U.S. Winter Olympic Trials broadcast schedule

Katie Ledecky wins race by 54 seconds, breaks record

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Katie Ledecky is back at Stanford and back to pulverizing distance races.

The sophomore and five-time Olympic champion won a 1,650-yard freestyle by 54.45 seconds at a meet at Texas A&M on Saturday night.

The runner-up was in a different heat; Ledecky won her heat by 1:02.16.

Ledecky lowered her own American record, clocking 15:03.31. She had the previous mark of 15:03.92 set last Nov. 20.

Ledecky had every swimmer lapped in the 25-yard pool before the halfway point and ended up lapping everyone twice.

The men also raced a 1,650 on Saturday. The winner clocked 15:18.95, which was 15.64 seconds slower than Ledecky’s time.

Full results are here.

The 1,650 is the longest race on the NCAA program, while the longest race at the Olympics and world championships is the 1500m.

The No. 2 woman all-time in the 1,650 is triple 2008 Olympic medalist Katie Hoff, a full 21.04 seconds slower.

Ledecky owns the 1500m world record, too, 13.4 seconds faster than any other woman in history.

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