Sochi clock

Russia time change before 2014 Olympics would have cost $300 million

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Russia has already ruled out turning its clocks back one hour this winter, and the Sochi Olympic Organizing Committee president offered 300,000,000 more reasons why.

“We forecast, other than the reputational risk and discomfort to our athletes, logistical issues and financial risks,” Dmitry Chernyshenko said, according to R-Sport. “The extra expenditure needed from the federal budget to compensate international broadcasters who might lose advertising contracts in the event of a time change will lead to penalties, and we will have to compensate for it. The sum of the risks could exceed $300 million.”

Russia stopped turning its clocks back in 2011. Sochi is currently eight hours ahead of Eastern time and will be nine hours ahead after daylight savings time ends Nov. 3 and through the Olympics.

The times of competitions for the Sochi Games will be vastly different from the London 2012 Olympics (five hours ahead of ET) and the Vancouver 2010 Olympics (three hours behind ET).

Here is a full viewers guide, and here are the times of some major Sochi Olympic events:

Friday, Feb. 7: Opening ceremony — 8 p.m. Sochi/11 a.m. ET
Tuesday, Feb. 11: Men’s snowboard halfpipe final — 9:30 p.m. Sochi/12:30 p.m. ET
Wednesday, Feb. 12: Women’s downhill — 11 a.m. Sochi/2 a.m. ET
Wednesday, Feb. 13: Women’s snowboard halfpipe final — 9:30 p.m. Sochi/12:30 p.m. ET
Friday, Feb. 14: Men’s figure skating free skate (medal contenders) — 10 p.m. Sochi/1 p.m. ET
Thursday, Feb. 20: Women’s hockey gold-medal game — 9 p.m. Sochi/Noon ET
Thursday, Feb. 20: Women’s figure skating free skate (medal contenders) — 10 p.m. Sochi/1 p.m. ET
Sunday, Feb. 23: Men’s hockey gold-medal game — 4 p.m. Sochi/7 a.m. ET

Dolphin to be part of Sochi Olympic torch relay

Alina Zagitova is OAR’s first gold medalist of PyeongChang

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15-year-old Alina Zagitova won the first gold medal for the Olympic Athletes from Russia on Thursday night in the ladies’ free skate in PyeongChang.

Yevgenia Medvedeva, her training partner and the two-time world champion, earned silver by a margin of 1.31 points. That’s the exact margin Zagitova led Medvedeva by after the short program on Tuesday.

This marks the first time two women from the same country have shared the ladies’ figure skating podium since Tara Lipinski and Michelle Kwan in 1998. Speaking of Lipinski – Zagitova is less than a month older than Lipinski was when she won gold in Nagano, and Zagitova is now the second-youngest individual ladies’ Olympic champion in history.

Kaetlyn Osmond earned bronze – Canada’s first Olympic medal in ladies’ figure skating since 2010.

Results

Gold: Alina Zagitova (OAR)

Silver: Yevgenia Medvedeva (OAR)

Bronze: Kaetlyn Osmond (CAN)

9. Bradie Tennell (USA)

10. Mirai Nagasu (USA)

11. Karen Chen (USA)

Click here to read the full recap and watch highlights from the ladies’ free skate program

Serwa, Phelan continue Canada’s dominance of women’s ski cross

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Canadian skiers Kelsey Serwa and Brittany Phelan took the top spots in women’s ski cross at the 2018 PyeongChang Olympics, giving Canada its third consecutive gold medal in this event.

Switzerland’s Fanny Smith edged out Sweden’s Sandra Naeslund in the big final to claim the final spot on the podium.

Read the rest of the story and watch video at NBCOlympics.com