North Pole

Sochi Olympic torch relay begins trek to North Pole

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Over the next two weeks, the Olympic flame will journey to and from the North Pole.

One of the most ambitious parts of the Sochi Olympic torch relay has started, according to Sochi Olympic Organizing Committee president Dmitry Chernyshenko.

The flame is aboard Russian icebreaker ship “50 years of victory” and will travel more then 3,000 miles from Murmansk, Russia, to the North Pole for a lighting ceremony and back to Murmansk.

Among the torch bearers for the North Pole trip is an American, University of Alaska Fairbanks Vice Chancellor Pat Pitney. Pitney, 48, won a gold medal in shooting at the 1984 Los Angeles Games.

“It is humbling to be selected to represent the United States, Alaska, the Arctic, UAF and the Olympic movement,” Pitney said in a press release, according to the Fairbanks Daily News-Miner. “Imagine, carrying the Olympic torch around the North Pole; I am so excited.”

Torch bearers before the North Pole trip included those who carried torches during the Moscow 1980 Olympic torch relay.

A torch — but not the flame — is expected to go into space and reach the International Space Station in November.

The torch design has been tweaked for the space mission to prevent it from slipping out of a bearer’s grip during a spacewalk, according to R-Sport.

An unlit torch with an extra tether attached is to be carried into open space by cosmonauts Oleg Kotov and Sergei Ryazansky, during which time it will orbit Earth several times, said the head of the Cosmonauts’ Training Center Sergei Krikalev.

“The Olympic torch for space is just like the one for Earth, but there will be no gas in it,” he said.

“To take it into open space the object was reworked: An extra fixing element has been added to attach a tether to, just so it doesn’t happen to fly away,” Krikalev added.

Dolphin to be part of torch relay

Fiji Olympic rugby coach given 3 acres of land, special name

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 11:  Gold medalists Ro Dakuwaqa of Fiji and Fiji head coach Ben Ryan celebrate after the medal ceremony for the Men's Rugby Sevens on Day 6 of the Rio 2016 Olympics at Deodoro Stadium on August 11, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)
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Olympic coaches don’t receive gold medals. Fiji Olympic men’s rugby coach Ben Ryan may have gotten something better anyway.

Ryan’s reward for guiding Fiji to its first Olympic medal in any sport — gold in rugby sevens’ Olympic debut — included three acres of land in Fiji and a new name, Ratu Peni Raiyani Latianara, according to Fijian reports.

Ryan, a London native, is stepping down as coach of the Fijian team. The 44-year-old coached the team for three years after leading the England national sevens team for six years.

MORE: Fiji wins nation’s first Olympic medal

Aksel Lund Svindal says season, career still at risk after crash

Aksel Lund Svindal
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OSLO, Norway (AP) — Norwegian skier Aksel Lund Svindal says the knee injury that took him out of the World Cup last season was worse than he’s been letting on.

Svindal was the overall World Cup leader when he injured his right knee in a crash during a downhill in Kitzbuehel, Austria, on Jan. 23. Watch video of the crash here.

In an interview with Norwegian broadcaster NRK, Svindal said not only did he rupture a cruciate ligament, he also damaged his meniscus and cartilage.

Svindal, who won a medal of every color at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games, is back on skis training for the upcoming World Cup season.

But he said the cartilage problems are particularly worrisome and could put the season, and even his career, at risk.

MORE: Lindsey Vonn wants to race men, retire in 2019