Patrick Chan

Patrick Chan’s phone call with Sidney Crosby at Vancouver Olympics

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Patrick Chan‘s Olympic debut as a teenager in 2010 included typical nerves and an out-of-the ordinary conversation with the Canadian under the most pressure at the Vancouver Games.

Chan, then 19, was en route to the rink with trainer Andy O’Brien, who also works with Sidney Crosby.

Let the Canadian Press pick it up from there:

“I told Andy I was nervous — who wouldn’t be? — I was really nervous about the event. Andy was like, ‘Oh, I’ll call Sid,’” said Chan, who opens his season next week at Skate Canada International.

“We talked about expectations and at the end of the day, he told me, ‘Yeah, the Canadian hockey team has the most pressure out of all the events.’ The way he put it in perspective was that we train every day and we train every day to kind of build an automatic pilot, and in order to initiate that automatic pilot when you’re playing, you have to put it in perspective.

“For example, my mentality is that this isn’t the end of the world, people will support me because they want me to win, and they want the best for me and they want a medal for Canada, and I accept that. But then I have to be selfish in a way and realize I’m doing it for myself and that was the mistake I made in Vancouver. I wanted to win the medal for Canada, and I looked at it as a big picture instead of narrowing it down to me wanting to be there, and me wanting to compete and excited to compete, and eager to win a medal.”

Chan entered the 2010 Olympics as the reigning world silver medalist with overwhelming pressure — to become Canada’s first Olympic men’s figure skating champion after years of just misses and the first teenager to win the event in 62 years.

His medal hopes were dashed via a seventh-place finish in the short program. He rebounded with the fourth-best free skate, a personal-best score, to finish fifth overall.

Ten days later, Crosby scored the game-winning goal in overtime as Canada beat the U.S. for hockey gold on the final day of the Olympics.

The phone call is not the first time Chan and Crosby have been linked.

A chiropractor also compared the two.

“I found Sidney Crosby’s Asian brother,” Mark Lindsay reportedly said, according to the Toronto Star, after first working on Chan.

“One of the things that’s really unique is they’ve got really good tissue,” O’Brien told the newspaper. “They have the ability to be very muscular but very flexible.”

Despite the pressure, Chan was not the favorite going into the Vancouver Olympics. 2009 world champion Evan Lysacek and 2006 Olympic champion Evgeni Plushenko battled for gold, as expected.

But this time, Chan enters as the three-time reigning world champion (though his most recent title was heavily disputed).

“Vancouver was a pressure because it was a thought of winning a gold medal at home.” Chan told reporters in a conference call previewing Skate Canada next week. “I put that pressure on myself, like, ‘Oh my god, the dream of all dreams would be to win an Olympic gold medal in your home country and hearing your anthem in Canada.’

“Sochi is different. … Coming in as three-time world champion, you put expectations on yourself, there’s a lot of talk. ‘Is this the year that he’s not going to put it together, and he’s going to be dethroned?’ I think I have many more tools going into Sochi to overcome those pressures.”

Evan Lysacek out of Skate America

Nick Symmonds auctions body ad space for double 2012 amount

Nick Symmonds
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U.S. 800m runner Nick Symmonds‘ right shoulder is apparently twice as valuable as his left shoulder.

The two-time Olympian auctioned ad space on his body for a second straight Olympic summer, with the final bid at $21,800 for nine square inches on his right shoulder in an Ebay auction that ended Thursday afternoon.

T-Mobile CEO John Legere‘s Twitter account claimed the winning bid of 107 overall bids.

In 2012, Symmonds auctioned the same nine inches on his left shoulder for $11,100 to Hanson Dodge Creative, a marketing agency based in Milwaukee. Here’s what that temporary tattoo looked like.

Symmonds’ temporary tattoo was not visible during the 2012 Olympics or 2012 Olympic Trials, as rules mandate the advertisement is taped over in those events plus other IAAF competitions.

Symmonds, 32, finished fifth at the 2012 Olympics and second at the 2013 World Championships.

He was left off the 2015 World Championships roster, after winning the national title, after refusing to sign a USA Track and Field contract that required athletes to wear Nike-branded Team USA gear at team functions at Worlds.

Symmonds’ apparel sponsor has been Brooks since January 2014. He was previously a Nike-sponsored Oregon Track Club member for seven years.

MORE: Mother, son set to compete in same Olympics for first time

Karch Kiraly to remain U.S. women’s volleyball coach through 2020

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Karch Kiraly will continue as U.S. women’s volleyball team head coach through the 2020 Olympics, agreeing to a four-year contract renewal.

“It’s been a tremendous honor to lead this special group of intelligent, powerful, hard-working, dedicated women, and the great staff that supports them — and it’s a double honor to prepare for battle at the Rio Olympics, knowing we’ll have the opportunity to carry that work forward in the next quadrennial,” Kiraly said in a press release.

Kiraly, the only U.S. volleyball player to earn indoor and beach Olympic titles, took over after serving on Hugh McCutcheon‘s staff from 2009 through the 2012 Olympics, where the U.S. women took silver behind Brazil.

Kiraly then led the U.S. women to their first World or Olympic title in 2014. They are ranked No. 1 in the world ahead of China and Brazil.

The program has gone 50 years with zero Olympic golds and broke a 62-year World Championship drought in 2014.

Kiraly, 55, is set to become the first coach of multiple U.S. Olympic women’s volleyball teams since Terry Liskevych from 1988 through 1996.

MORE: U.S. women’s volleyball team inspired by tennis legend