Lolo Jones

Lolo Jones one step closer to Olympics; U.S. Bobsled National Team named


Lolo Jones is on the path to the Sochi Olympics, but so are five other bobsled push athletes seeking one of a likely three spots on the U.S. Olympic Team.

Jones, the two-time Olympic hurdler, was named to the U.S. Bobsled National Team on Saturday following the final selection race in Park City, Utah, on Friday night.

Jones, 31, was expected to be named to the national team as she’s among the top three or four contenders to make the Sochi Olympics. The national team members will compete on the World Cup circuit, beginning Nov. 30 in Calgary, to earn the U.S. spots in Sochi.

The U.S. Olympic Team is expected to be named in mid-to-late January.

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“Last year I was just soaking everything in,” Jones said, according to The Associated Press. “It was an adventure, it was fun, it was nothing really on the line for me. It was just kind of an escape and there were no expectations. So now coming into my second year, they expect me to be more knowledgeable and more of a leader.”

Joining Jones on the national team are three drivers — 2010 Olympic bronze medalist Elana MeyersJamie Greubel and Jazmine Fenlator — and five push athletes — three-time Olympic sprinter Lauryn WilliamsAja EvansKatie EberlingEmily Azevedo and Army soldier-athlete Kristi Koplin.

Meyers, Greubel and Fenlator were also the top three U.S. drivers last season and are favorites to make up the U.S. Olympic Team, should the U.S. qualify three two-woman sleds for Sochi.

“Jazmine, Elana and I all started driving around the same time so we have that kind of friendly rivalry and I think it works really well for us,” Greubel said, according to the AP. “We work together and shake each other’s hands at the end of the day, no matter who’s on top. I really respect the other girls that are drivers on the team. They definitely help push me to be a better athlete.”

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Evans and Eberling are considered favorites to make the Olympic team as push athletes. Azevedo and Jones were also on the national team last year and may be battling for that third and final spot.

A key will be which push athletes are paired with the three drivers at World Cup events.

“This is the fastest and most prepared group of athletes we’ve ever seen,” Darrin Steele, U.S. Bobsled & Skeleton Federation CEO, said in a press release. “It was difficult to narrow the women’s push field to six, and it will be even more challenging to select the top three for the Olympic team in a few months. The hard work and dedication has paid off and I couldn’t be more proud of all these athletes.”

The men’s bobsled national team, led by 2010 Olympic champion Steve Holcomb, is expected to be announced on Sunday morning.

Video: The art of bobsledding

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

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Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site

Youth Olympic flame lit in Athens ahead of Lillehammer 2016

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The torch relay for the second Youth Winter Olympics — in Lillehammer, Norway, from Feb. 12-21 — began with a ceremonial flame lighting at Panathenaic Stadium in Athens on Tuesday.

The stadium hosted the first modern Olympics in 1896.

The flame will travel across all 19 Norwegian provinces before the Feb. 12 Opening Ceremony at the 1994 Winter Olympic host city. The first Youth Winter Olympics were in Innsbruck, Austria, in 2012.

The Rio 2016 Olympic torch relay will begin with its ceremonial flame lighting at the ancient Olympic site of Olympia in Greece on April 21.

MORE: Youth Summer Olympics wrap with Closing Ceremony, Lionel Messi cameo