Patrick Chan

Patrick Chan runs away with Skate Canada title (video)

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Patrick Chan‘s Olympic season is off to a dominant start.

The three-time reigning world champion dusted off the field to win his fourth Skate Canada, posting 262.03 total points and receiving a standing ovation from a flag-waving crowd in Saint John, New Brunswick, on Saturday.

Chan won by a comfortable 27.23 over second-place Nobunari Oda of Japan.

Earlier, Canadian Olympic champions Tessa Virtue and Scott Moir won the ice dance competition with 181.03 points. Their total was 7.20 points lower than world champions Meryl Davis and Charlie White at Skate America last week.

NBC and NBC Live Extra will have Skate Canada coverage Sunday from 4-6.

Gold gets bronze behind Russian teen

Chan, 22, did not beat Japan’s Tatsuki Machida‘s score at Skate America last week — 265.38.

He landed a quadruple toe loop-triple toe loop combination to start his program and added another quad jump skating to Vivaldi’s “Four Seasons.”

“To be honest, I was kind of nervous,” Chan said of his free skate. “The best way to look at it is one element at a time.”

Also, the silver and bronze medalists from March’s World Championships, Kazakhstan’s Denis Ten and Spain’s Javier Fernandez, have yet to skate in the early Grand Prix season.

Americans Jeremy Abbott and Josh Farris fell on their opening jumps. Farris, the reigning world junior champion, recovered and improved from eighth after the short program to fifth with 216.72 points.

Abbott, the three-time U.S. champion, unraveled and dropped from fourth to sixth with 215.95. The other American, Ross Miner, was ninth at 196.89.

All three U.S. men at Skate America last week — Adam Rippon, Max Aaron and Jason Brown — posted higher overall scores.

Two U.S. men will make the Olympic team following the U.S. Championships in Boston in January.

In ice dancing, Virtue and Moir beat fellow Canadians Kaitlyn Weaver and Andrew Poje by 5.80 points in their Grand Prix season debut.

Virtue and Moir are next scheduled for Trophee Bombard in Paris in three weeks and could go head-to-head with Davis and White at the Grand Prix Final in Fukuoka, Japan, in the first week of December.

The only U.S. couple at Skate Canada, Madison Hubbell and Zachary Donohue, placed third with 153.20 points. They scored .22 higher than at Skate America last week, where they were the third best U.S. couple.

The U.S. earned three ice dance spots at the Olympics. Hubbell and Donohue will know how they stack up early in the season when U.S. silver medalists Madison Chock and Evan Bates skate at Cup of China next week.

Men
1. Patrick Chan (CAN) 262.03
3. Yuzuru Hanyu (JPN) 234.80
2. Nobunari Oda (JPN) 233.00
4. Michal Brezina (CZE) 218.32
5. Josh Farris (USA) 216.72
6. Jeremy Abbott (USA) 215.95
7. Elladj Balde (CAN) 205.19
8. Andrei Rogozine (CAN) 197.35
9. Ross Miner (USA) 196.89
10. Takahito Mura (JPN) 188.53

Ice Dance
1. Virtue/Moir (CAN) 181.03
2. Weaver/Poje (CAN) 175.23
3. Hubbell/Donohue (USA) 153.20
4. Razanova/Tkachenko (RUS) 145.56
5. Paul/Islam (CAN) 143.77
6. Zhiganshina/Gazsi (GER) 138.16
7. Guignard/Fabbri (ITA) 134.28
8. Stepanova/Bukin (RUS) 133.12

Patrick Chan defends Detroit, inspired by Justin Verlander

The secret messages Lindsey Vonn wrote on her Olympic race suit

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SCHEDULE UPDATE: Vonn will will return for the final women’s downhill training run on Monday at 9 p.m. ET. LIVE STREAM

Look closely at Lindsey Vonn.

When NBC cameras zoom in on the two-time Olympic medalist, viewers will notice that she wrote a couple of messages on her uniform in permanent marker.

On the thumb of her right glove, Vonn has the word “believe” in Greek. It mirrors a tattoo she has on the inside of a finger.

“Signifying my last Olympics [in 2018] and just need to believe in myself,” Vonn said to NBC’s Nick Zaccardi.

On her helmet, Vonn has the initials “D.K.” and a heart. It is meant to honor her late grandfather, Don Kildow.

Kildow, who served in the Korean War from 1952-54, died on Nov. 1. Watch to learn more about Vonn’s special relationship with her grandparents:

Hard falls at Olympics, but no hard rules about concussions

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — At the bottom of the Olympic aerials landing hill, where crashes are common and the term “slap back” is part of the everyday lingo, skiers spend almost as much time figuring out how to protect their heads as they do working on all those flips and spins.

“We learn how to fall,” U.S. jumper Jon Lillis said.

Elsewhere around the action-sports venue, that’s not so much the case.

Concussion dangers lurk everywhere — from the iced-over deck of the halfpipe, to the steeply pitched landings on the slopestyle course, to the careening twists and turns of the snowboard cross track, to the aerials course, where “slap back” is the term for when a skier’s head slaps backward against the snow. But at the Olympics, there are no hard-and-fast rules regarding who diagnoses head injuries, and no hard-and-fast protocol that athletes must clear to be allowed back on the slopes after a concussion.

“A bit concerning,” says neurologist Kevin Weber of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “Because you worry that athletes in other sports that may not be as popular as football are getting, I wouldn’t say ignored, but the concussions they’re getting are under-scrutinized.”

Read the full story at NBCOlympics.com