Shalane Flanagan

Olympians at New York City Marathon reminded of Boston

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NEW YORK — Shalane Flanagan noticed the difference right away.

At Central Park, two men in navy blue jackets with “SECURITY” emblazoned on their backs guarded the doors. There was a metal detector. There were wands.

This was the entrance to the New York City Marathon media center Thursday, three days before the race.

“I can’t recall there being security like there is today,” Flanagan said once inside.

This year’s group of 45,000 runners will take part with the backdrop of tragedy Sunday. Superstorm Sandy canceled the New York City Marathon for the first time in its 42-year history a year ago. Controversially, the New York Road Runners did not decide to scrap the race until two days before.

The Boston Marathon bombings of April 15 put greater emphasis on security in the five-borough event.

Flanagan, 32, has run the New York City Marathon once, finishing second in 2010 in her 26.2-mile debut. The three-time Olympian will not contest Sunday’s race but is here for the Dash to the Finish Line 5K on Saturday.

She arrived for a media session on a soggy Thursday with Boston on her sleep-deprived mind. Flanagan grew up in the fishing and yachting town of Marblehead, Mass., a sub-90-minute run from Boston at her pace.

She stayed up to watch the Red Sox finish off the Cardinals in Game 6 to win the World Series at Fenway Park on Wednesday night.

Flanagan ran into another New Englander early Thursday — 1984 Olympic marathon champion Joan Benoit Samuelson of Maine. They talked about the finish line of the Boston Marathon, about how Red Sox fans descended on Boylston Street the previous night in celebration, some kissing the pavement.

Samuelson, wearing Boston red socks, was inducted into the New York Road Runners Hall of Fame on Thursday, along with 1972 Olympic marathon champion Frank Shorter, four-time New York City Marathon winner Bill Rodgers and Ted Corbitt, the New York Road Runners founder and an African-American distance running pioneer.

Flanagan and Samuelson also met in Boston on April 15, shortly after two homemade bombs went off near the finish line, killing three people and injuring more than 260.

Boston forms panel to look at 2024 Olympic bid

source: AP
Joan Benoit Samuelson threw out the first pitch at a Red Sox game two days before the Boston Marathon. She was at Fenway Park for Game 1 of the World Series. (AP)

Samuelson, 55, completed the Boston Marathon in 2 hours, 50 minutes, 29 seconds. She achieved her goal of running within 30 minutes of her winning time at the 1983 Boston Marathon, a then-world record 2:22.43.

That day six months ago, for the first time she could remember, she did not hear her name read over speakers as she crossed the finish line of a major race. The announcer had stepped away momentarily.

“It was eerily quiet,” Samuelson said. “Little did I know it was foreboding for what was to come.”

Two hours later, she was at the Fairmont Copley Plaza Hotel, getting out of the shower and getting ready for lunch.

“I heard and felt the blast,” she said. “Initially, I thought it was a transformer. My husband knew right away it was a bomb.”

Samuelson said everybody was told to go to the third floor of the hotel. Her husband, Scott, thought it would be a better idea to go down to the lobby.

“The first person I saw was Shalane Flanagan running up to the third floor,” Samuelson said. “I said, ‘Shalane, we’re going to go down and not up.'”

Flanagan remembered, too.

“(Samuelson) was just clearly visibly upset,” said Flanagan, who also ran in Boston and took fourth in 2:27.08. “She’s really good at giving hugs. She gives a really good, mean hug. She just gave everyone a hug. I think both she and I ‑‑ I don’t know if it’s a New Englander thing, but we were both pretty pissed off that someone would ruin such a wonderful day.”

Samuelson ended up staying in the hotel as it was put on lockdown for a couple of hours. The cell phone service was spotty for a while. Samuelson called the scene surreal.

“All sorts of rumors,” she said. “We didn’t really know what was happening.”

Shorter, 66, said he was the last person out of the Fairmont Copley Plaza before they locked it down. He was covering the Boston Marathon for Universal Sports and en route to a TV truck (via shortcut) when the second bomb went off no more than 50 yards away.

“I walked by a medical tent where they were doing triage,” he said. “I was kind of in shock.”

New York Road Runners CEO Mary Wittenberg was also at the Boston Marathon, to watch the race.

“My last image of Boston was Joanie (Samuelson) crossing the finish line, so happy, running an amazing 2:50,” she said.

Wittenberg, 51, then boarded a train back to New York’s Penn Station. An hour into the trip, she received a text message from a friend.

“Our greatest nightmare — bombs at the finish line of Boston,” she said. “I can still feel it. Total sickness.”

That night, Wittenberg spoke to New York City Police Department commissioner Raymond Kelly. She met with the New York Road Runners staff the following morning.

“First about honoring and supporting and Boston,” she said, “then what measures should we take to what is already a safe and strong security plan to enhance it.”

The Road Runners hired an international firm, MSA Security, to conduct “a top-to-bottom analysis” of the organization’s existing security plan, she told The New York Times. They graded out well, but security will be increased Sunday.

Hundreds of police officers, police helicopters and police boats will line the course and watch from the sky and sea, according to The Associated Press. There will be plain-clothes officers and bomb-sniffing dogs, as usual, but also 100 new mobile security cameras the NYPD bought after Boston.

For the first time, an area near the Central Park finish will be fenced off with extra security to enter, according to the AP. All bags will be searched, according to The New York Times.

Also, a special yellow line in honor of Boston will be painted on the pavement near the finish, accompanying the normal blue line.

“I don’t know that we’ve ever been so looking forward to welcoming back runners from around the world, New Yorkers to the streets and other people watching as part of this nation and worldwide,” Wittenberg said. “The meaning is just on so many levels. We really need to get back to a really good day.”

Kenyan women eye marathon world record 

Alysia Montano races pregnant again at USATF Outdoor Championships

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U.S. Olympic 800m runner Alysia Montaño raced five months pregnant in 110-degree heat at the USATF Outdoor Championships in Sacramento, Calif., on Thursday.

Montaño, who raced eight months pregnant at the 2014 USATF Outdoors also in Sacramento, finished last in her 800m first-round heat in 2:21.40. She was 10 seconds faster than her time three years ago.

“People were like, oh, you’re going to run faster than you did last time because you’re less pregnant,” Montaño told media in Sacramento, standing next to 2-year-old daughter Linnea. “I was like, I’m still pregnant.”

Athletes are looking for top-three finishes to qualify for the world championships in London in August. Finals are later this weekend.

USATF OUTDOORS: Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview
Broadcast Schedule | Full Results

In a Wonder Woman top, Montaño gritted her teeth on the final straightaway and raised her arms crossing the finish line.

“[In 2014] women let me know that my journey and my story had inspired them in so many different ways,” Montaño said. “I think there’s something about coming out to any venue, not really expecting to win, but just going along with the journey and seeing what comes out of it. And that’s the most beautiful part for me, being a track and field athlete, the platform that I have, I feel so responsible to be a representative of people who don’t have the same platform, don’t have the same voice that I do.

“I represent so many different people. I represent women. I represent black women. I represent pregnant women. Not everybody has the same platform that I do. I think it’s my responsibility to make sure I’m a voice and advocate for them.”

Montaño said she was inspired when she learned Gal Gadot, who played the title role in the movie “Wonder Woman,” filmed half of it while five months pregnant.

“I saw Wonder Woman, and I was like, I for sure am signing up for USA Nationals,” Montaño said. “I already was thinking I was going to do it.”

Montaño said it wasn’t easier or harder racing Thursday versus three years ago, when she had a bigger baby bump.

“The weird part about five months is you’re still growing and like shifting a lot,” she said. “So every week you have to readjust.”

Linnea has seen enough photos of her mom’s famous race in 2014 to know what was going on.

“I go, mom is going to run with your sibling in her belly,” Montaño recalled. “I did that with you, too. And [Linnea] was like, ‘Yeah, it was sticking out!'”

Montaño raced outdoors for the first time since falling in the Olympic Trials 800m final on July 4. Montaño had won the previous Olympic Trials (and finished fourth in London) and the 2015 U.S. title coming back from pregnancy.

She ran without an apparel sponsor Thursday, frustrated that Asics waited until December to say they were not interested in retaining her for 2017. Montaño said that left her no time to try and find a different sponsor, even though she was already planning to have her second child.

“You need to let an athlete know in September, October,” she said. “I’ve been calling [Asics] since September to be like, hey, I didn’t make the Olympic team, I’m 30, I’m going to have another baby.”

In the men’s 800m Thursday, two-time Olympian and 2013 World silver medalist Nick Symmonds was eliminated, 32nd-fastest of 33 runners in the first round.

Symmonds, in his final season, said he has one more race left — the Honolulu Marathon on Dec. 10.

MORE: Montaño finds little joy after Russian stripped of medals

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Tyson Gay, Trayvon Bromell eliminated in 100m heats at USATF Outdoors

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Olympians Tyson Gay and Trayvon Bromell were eliminated in the 100m first round at the USATF Outdoor Championships, failing to make the world championships team in the event.

Gay, 34, is racing this weekend eight months after the death of 15-year-old daughter Trinity Gay. His last attempt to make the world team is in the 200m on Saturday and Sunday in Sacramento, but Gay is an underdog there, too.

Gay was third in his 100m heat in 10.17 seconds on Thursday, well off his American record of 9.69 seconds set in 2009. The top two automatically made Friday’s semifinals.

“I had a slight stumble in the blocks and couldn’t really recover,” Gay told media in Sacramento, adding that he was dealing with minor injuries this year.

USATF OUTDOORS: Men’s Preview | Women’s Preview
Broadcast Schedule | Full Results

Starting in 2005, Gay had qualified for every Olympics and world championships except for 2011. He also was taken off the 2013 Worlds team for failing a drug test.

Gay is the last man to outsprint Usain Bolt at an Olympics or worlds, sweeping the 100m, 200m and 4x100m titles in 2007. Gay is the fastest man in history without an Olympic medal to his name.

Bromell, a 2015 World 100m bronze medalist, finished third in his heat in 10.22 fading in the last half. Bromell, 21, was racing for the first time since the Rio Olympics, coming back from Achilles surgery. He was racing hurt.

After summer surgery, Bromell kept off his foot until January, but when he returned to the track the pain came back. Bromell missed another month of training. He’s still dealing with inflammation, but a doctor said there’s no chance he could tear anything in Sacramento.

“When I got to like, 50 [meters], I started feeling some pain,” Bromell told media in Sacramento. “I wanted to show people that I’ve got heart.”

Bromell is not racing in the 200m this weekend, so he is definitively out of worlds in London in August.

“Next year, you’re going to see a new Trayvon,” he said.

The other favorites — Justin Gatlin and Christian Coleman — won their heats in 10.0 and 9.93, respectively, to advance. The final is also Friday, when the top three will qualify for the world 100m team and likely the top six for the 4x100m relay.

Gatlin said this year is “probably the most injured I’ve ever been.” He missed weeks of training, slowed by a quadriceps/groin problem since February, according to The Associated Press.

In the women’s 100m, all the favorites advanced to Friday’s semifinals, including Rio Olympic silver medalist Tori Bowie (10.90), nine-time Olympic medalist Allyson Felix (11.03) and Olympic Trials winner English Gardner (11.04).

Felix has a bye into the world championships 400m as defending champion, which she plans to race. Her worlds schedule beyond that is to be determined.

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