Rene Fasel

Winter sports chief concerned about possible 2022 World Cup in November

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The Winter Olympics would surely be affected if the 2022 World Cup is moved to January or February, but even a potential November World Cup in Qatar is being met with concern by winter sports officials.

“November is the start of the (winter sports) season for maybe, I would say, all the other federations,” Rene Fasel, who heads the Association of International Olympic Winter Sports Federations, told the AP. “For sure, we have to put up the flag and say, ‘Hey guys, be careful.’”

Fasel also heads the International Ice Hockey Federation.

“We should really clearly show our position and protect our own interests,” he said, according to the AP.

Senior officials from specific winter sports federations will meet and discuss an International Ski Federation (FIS) proposal this week, according to the AP.

“FIS will submit a proposal to the other six International Winter Sports Federations to sign a resolution against organizing the FIFA World Cup during the winter sports season in 2022,” was a decision made by the FIS Council at a Sunday meeting.

The 2022 World Cup will be held in Qatar, whose summer heat has caused soccer leaders to propose moving the tournament from June-July. November and January have been talked about.

In September, the International Olympic Committee reportedly “warned” FIFA about switching dates for 2022.

“We were aware that FIFA might consider changing the dates for the 2022 World Cup,” an IOC spokesman told the Press Association in the United Kingdom in September. “We are confident that FIFA will discuss the dates with us so as to coordinate them and avoid any effect on the Winter Games.”

In August, it was reported that though moving the World Cup out of the oppressive Qatari summer was likely, it was unlikely to move to February, the usual month for the Winter Olympics.

Almaty, Kazakhstan, is the one city to submit a 2022 Winter Olympic bid so far. Munich is moving forward with a bid, as are other European applicants.

The U.S. will not bid. The deadline to apply to the IOC is Nov. 14.

Boston to look into 2024 Olympic bid

WATCH LIVE: Big Air at Fenway — 8:30 p.m. ET

Fenway Big Air
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Fenway Park will host some of the world’s best freeskiers in the one-of-a-kind Big Air at Fenway, live on NBC Sports Live Extra on Friday night.

Big air skiers will descend from a ramp that’s four times higher than the Green Monster inside the hallowed Boston Red Sox home.

Ski big air is most like slopestyle of the current Olympic disciplines, except skiers get one jump per run.

WATCH LIVE: Big Air at Fenway — 8:30 p.m. ET

On Thursday, Canadian Max Parrot and American Julia Marino won the snowboard big air competitions at Fenway Park.

Big Air at Fenway coverage will conclude with an NBC show on Saturday at 5 p.m. ET.

MORE: Olympic champ suffers concussion at Big Air at Fenway practice

Lillehammer Youth Winter Olympics open with homages to 1994

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In an homage to the Lillehammer 1994 Winter Olympics, Princess Ingrid Alexandra of Norway lit the Lillehammer Youth Winter Olympic cauldron to cap the Opening Ceremony on Friday night.

The princess’ father, Crown Prince Haakon, lit the 1994 Olympic cauldron in a very similar fashion (video here). Princess Ingrid Alexandra was born in 2004.

The Opening Ceremony, held outdoors at a ski jump (same venue as 1994) in sub-freezing temperatures, included a speech from International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach.

“I’m just a little bit too old to compete in the YOG,” Bach said, urging listeners to use the hashtag #IloveYOG during the nine-day Winter Games.

The ceremony included Olympic legends, such as 2010 figure skating gold medalist Yuna Kim and eight-time Olympic cross-country champion Bjorn Daehlie carrying the Olympic flag.

Marit Bjoergen, a 10-time Olympic medalist cross-country skier, handed the Olympic flame to the princess.

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra will air coverage of the Opening Ceremony on Saturday at 12:30 a.m. ET, plus daily coverage throughout the Winter Games. A full broadcast schedule is here.

MORE: Two years to Pyeongchang: Updates on U.S. Olympic medalists from Sochi