Luge

Lights out for USA Luge at Olympic sliding center

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The U.S. luge team’s training was cut short Monday afternoon at the Sanki Sliding Center in Sochi after power went out in the area.

“We didn’t really know what was going on,” said USA Luge Sports Program Director Mark Grimmette, a silver medalist at the 2002 Salt Lake Games, on a conference call with reporters. “I walked up to the finish area and started talking to the event and track manager who said that there was problem with the power in the next town over. We’re currently in the dark right now.”

A media relations representative from USA Luge said that American athletes there — Erin Hamlin, Julia Clukey, Kate Hansen, Chris Mazdzer and the doubles team of Preston Griffall and Matt Mortensen — were at their hotel in the dark, playing cards.

“We were about halfway through with our session when the power went completely out,” Grimmette said. “The lights on the track went off, the speakers went off and you could tell that everything was quiet and that all of the power had gone off on the track.”

USA Luge said power went out around 2 p.m. local time, but that it was only at the sliding center in the mountain cluster, not in the coastal city of Sochi itself.

“The team is functioning in candle light in their hotel after they had to abort their training session,” said Sandy Caligiore, the media and public relations director for USA Luge. “They were up on the track for 90 minutes.”

The U.S. is one of 31 nations training in Sochi this week,which includes 140 athletes total. The team is scheduled to be there through Thursday, though USA Luge officials said they believed the athletes would be granted a longer stay or given more runs prior to Sochi. A total of 50 runs were guaranteed to the Americans; they’ve completed 24.

“I’m sure that the FIL (International Luge Federation) is doing everything they can to make sure that everything is fair at the end of the day; they’ll figure it out,” said Gordy Sheer, USA Luge’s marketing director. “At this point, the athletes are more concerned with conserving the batteries on their cell phones.”

Living by candlelight here in Russia. #NoProblem

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John Shuster, 30 pounds lighter, rallies for 4th Olympic curling berth

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John Shuster is going to a fourth Olympics. It’s one more chance to prove Urban Dictionary wrong.

Shuster, 30 pounds lighter since his second straight Olympic failure in Sochi, led a team that beat Heath McCormick‘s squad at the U.S. Olympic Trials finals in Omaha on Saturday night.

Shuster, Tyler GeorgeMatt Hamilton and John Landsteiner lost the opener of a best-of-three finals series on Thursday.

They came back to deliver in a pair of must-win games, 9-4 on Friday night and 7-5 on Saturday, after spending each day at the Omaha Zoo.

The new-look Shuster — leaner and, at least this weekend, clutch — would astonish those who know him by scenes at the last two Olympics.

After taking bronze in 2006 as a role player, he led the last two U.S. Olympic teams to 2-7 records in 2010 and in 2014. Last place in Vancouver, where he was benched after an 0-4 start. Next to last place in Sochi.

After the last Olympics, the former bartender from Chisholm, Minn., was left off USA Curling’s 10-man high performance team.

He took it as motivation to get in shape.

Shuster, a father of a 2- and a 4-year-old who once said, “If I don’t have pizza three or four times a week, I’m not happy,” now totes meal replacement shakes. He’s starting to enjoy Olympic lifting.

Shuster, George, Hamilton and Landsteiner, all absent from that USA Curling high performance list, formed their own team. They became Team USA in their first season together and represented the Stars and Stripes at worlds in 2015, 2016 and 2017.

Their results — fourth, third and fifth —  marked the best string of U.S. men’s or women’s finishes at that level in a decade.

Shuster is set to join Debbie McCormick as the only Americans to curl at four Olympics. The sport was part of the first Winter Games in 1924, then absent as a medal sport until 1998.

“I don’t think it’s about the four Olympics for me,” Shuster said on NBCSN. “What this is about — and what I’m about — is getting my teammates to now. I have two new Olympians on this team, and I know how special that is.”

George, the 35-year-old vice skip for Shuster, led a team that lost to Shuster in the 2010 Olympic Trials final. The liquor store manager from Duluth, Minn., is going to his first Winter Games.

As is the 28-year-old Hamilton, whose younger sister qualified for PyeongChang earlier Saturday.

Landsteiner, a 27-year-old corrosion engineer, played with Shuster since 2011, including in Sochi.

Alternate Joe Polo can go 12 years between Olympic appearances after taking bronze on that Torino team.

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MORE: U.S. Winter Olympic Trials broadcast schedule

Katie Ledecky wins race by 54 seconds, breaks record

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Katie Ledecky is back at Stanford and back to pulverizing distance races.

The sophomore and five-time Olympic champion won a 1,650-yard freestyle by 54.45 seconds at a meet at Texas A&M on Saturday night.

The runner-up was in a different heat; Ledecky won her heat by 1:02.16.

Ledecky lowered her own American record, clocking 15:03.31. She had the previous mark of 15:03.92 set last Nov. 20.

Ledecky had every swimmer lapped in the 25-yard pool before the halfway point and ended up lapping everyone twice.

The men also raced a 1,650 on Saturday. The winner clocked 15:18.95, which was 15.64 seconds slower than Ledecky’s time.

Full results are here.

The 1,650 is the longest race on the NCAA program, while the longest race at the Olympics and world championships is the 1500m.

The No. 2 woman all-time in the 1,650 is triple 2008 Olympic medalist Katie Hoff, a full 21.04 seconds slower.

Ledecky owns the 1500m world record, too, 13.4 seconds faster than any other woman in history.

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MORE: Michael Phelps’ discussion with Katie Ledecky after 2017 Worlds