Thomas Bach

Leaders of IOC, Sochi Olympics at United Nations for Olympic Truce

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International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach and Sochi Olympic Organizing Committee president Dmitry Chernyshenko were at the United Nations on Wednesday as the General Assembly adopted the symbolic resolution for an Olympic Truce during the Sochi Games.

The Olympic Truce has been a common practice for two decades.

“Precisely because many of our principles are the same, it must always be clear in the relationship between sport and politics that the role of sport is always to build bridges,” Bach said. “It is never to build walls.”

For the first time, the Olympic Truce called “upon host countries to promote social inclusion without discrimination of any kind,” according to Reuters. The statement was first reported to be added to the truce by The New York Times in September.

This comes five months after Russia passed its law banning homosexual “propaganda” toward minors.

On Tuesday, Chernyshenko said those who wear rainbow colors at the Olympics in response to Russia’s anti-gay legislation will not face repercussions, according to USA Today.

“For me it sounds funny that someone is saying, ‘I am very brave. I will put my rainbow pin on and let me go to the (jail) in Russia because I will be promoting (gay rights) during the Olympic Games,'” he told the newspaper. “Has anybody noted what kind of uniform game organizers will be wearing?”

Volunteers and staff at the Olympics will wear multi-colored uniforms and gloves.

“People should not be afraid of painting their nails in a rainbow,” Chernyshenko said.

One of the fundamental principles of Olympism outlined in the Olympic Charter is this:

“Any form of discrimination with regard to a country or a person on grounds of race, religion, politics, gender or otherwise is incompatible with belonging to the Olympic Movement.”

Chernyshenko also told USA Today that Russia has collaborated with the U.S. for security during the Olympics, to make it the safest Games ever. He said military in Sochi will make for a “friendly atmosphere.”

Instead of military uniforms, the military providing Olympic security will be outfitted in “a special civilian uniform,” Chernyshenko said. They will wear uniforms similar to the Games organizers, but a different color.

Photos: Rocket readied to take Olympic torch to outer space

Michael Phelps: I had to keep marriage ‘hush-hush’

FILE - In this Aug. 9, 2016, file photo, United States' swimmer Michael Phelps celebrates winning his gold medal in the men's 200-meter butterfly with his fiance Nicole Johnson and baby Boomer during the swimming competitions at the 2016 Summer Olympics, in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. The Arizona Republic reported Oct. 26, 2016, that Phelps and Johnson secretly married on June 13, 2016. (AP Photo/Matt Slocum, File)
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Michael Phelps said Thursday that he had to keep his June marriage to Nicole Johnson “hush-hush.”

Phelps and Johnson, who got engaged in February 2015, were married June 13, though Phelps had been saying all summer and into the fall that they were not yet married.

“You guys probably already saw the article that was posted [about the marriage],” Phelps said, widening his eyes and sticking the tip of his tongue out while golfing shirtless with former Baltimore Ravens linebacker Ray Lewis. “I’ve been married for a while, been married for while, couple months. I had to keep it secret from y’all. I had to keep it hush-hush from you guys. Nicole and I are married. We are officially married.”

Phelps and Johnson welcomed baby boy Boomer on May 5.

“Why is it a secret? Just because. … Baby No. 2 may be coming soon, who knows though,” Phelps said.

VIDEO: Phelps in ‘Call of Duty’ trailer

Karolyis named in lawsuit against ex-USA Gymnastics doctor

In a July 15, 2008 photo, Dr. Larry Nassar works on the computer after seeing a patient in Michigan. Multiple gymnasts, including a member of the 2000 U.S. women's Olympic team, said they were sexually abused by Nassar, a former longtime doctor for USA Gymnastics, court documents and interviews show. (Becky Shink/Lansing State Journal via AP)
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LOS ANGELES (AP) — A former gymnast on the U.S. women’s national team is the latest athlete to accuse a longtime team doctor of sexual abuse.

But she’s the first to allege renowned husband-and-wife coaches Bela and Martha Karolyi knew about the abuse and did nothing to stop it.

The lawsuit filed Thursday in Los Angeles contends Dr. Larry Nassar repeatedly sexually abused the now-24-year-old gymnast when she was on the team from 2006 to 2011.

It says the Karolyis, and the current and former presidents of USA Gymnastics knew of molestations committed by Nassar before and during his employment, “yet chose to allow him to remain unsupervised,” allowing further abuse.

Nassar’s lawyer and the Karolyis didn’t respond to messages Thursday. Nassar’s lawyer has previously denied abuse allegations by two other gymnasts.

USA Gymnastics is also named in the suit. The Indiana-based governing body denies wrongdoing.

MORE: Michigan State fires Nassar after sexual abuse accusations