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Boston 2024 Olympics group brings in Mitt Romney

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A group in Boston is exploring a potential bid for the 2024 Olympics, and it’s got some star power.

An elite group of city leaders is “quietly exploring the prospect,” including bringing in 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics Organizing Committee president Mitt Romney as a key adviser, according to the Boston Globe.

“Boston would be a fantastic place for the Summer Games,” Romney told the newspaper. “It would be a marvelous community-building experience for Boston, and I think the people who would enjoy the games with or without tickets would say it was one of the best experiences of their life.”

Group leader John F. Fish, chairman of Suffolk Construction, hosted a U.S. Olympic Committee delegation over two days in October, according to the newspaper.

New England Patriots and New England Revolution owner Robert Kraft has also been consulted by the group.

“Just looking at it from our point of view, we’re probably going to seriously consider a downtown soccer stadium somewhere in Boston or the Greater Boston area,” Kraft told the newspaper. “We would try to help tailor something that could serve the needs of the Olympics and also our soccer team.”

The Globe pointed out potential issues that would have to be resolved for a Boston bid:

Though Boston is packed with athletic venues that could potentially host events, the city lacks several major components necessary to host a Summer Olympics. Transportation between venues in a cramped city with an aging subway system would also have to be closely examined. And supporters would have to galvanize political and community support for hosting the Games and show that potentially expensive facilities could be beneficial to the city long after the Olympic torch is put out.

The U.S. hasn’t hosted an Olympics since the 2002 Winter Games and is in the middle of its longest stretch between hosting Olympics since a 28-year gap between 1932 and 1960.

In February, the U.S. Olympic Committee sent letters to mayors of 35 cities to gauge interest in potential bids for 2024.

In March, Boston mayor Thomas Menino said the idea of bringing the Olympics to the city would be “far-fetched.”

In October, Massachusetts Governor Deval Patrick signed a bill to form a commission to look into a potential 2024 Boston Olympic bid with a completed report due  in March.

“It’s a huge-impact event,” Romney told the Globe. “It’s like 20 Super Bowls all at once. The transportation has to be completely redone. The fund-raising and marketing of the Games is extensive. It’s an amazing undertaking.”

USOC chairman Larry Probst said 2024 Olympic bidding will be talked about at USOC meetings in December, when a timetable for the selection of a city could be created. Bidding for the 2024 Olympic host begins in 2015, and the IOC will vote in 2017.

Los Angeles, Washington, D.C., Dallas and Philadelphia are among other cities that have expressed interest.

Probst said in September that if the USOC decides to bid, which would not be until 2014, that it will come from “not a long list of cities, realistically.”

L.A. moves forward with 2024 bid process

No Zika cases from Olympics, WHO says

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - NOVEMBER 12:  An aerial view of the Christ The Redeemer statue (F) and the Maracana Stadium (B) on November 12, 2013 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Buda Mendes/Getty Images)
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There have been zero Zika virus cases stemming from the Rio Olympics, the World Health Organization said Thursday.

“From the reports WHO received from national health authorities, there have so far been no laboratory confirmed cases of Zika virus in anyone associated with the Olympics,” the organization said in an online update Thursday.

Earlier this summer, several athletes cited Zika concerns in skipping the Olympics.

The World Health Organization said before the Rio Games that the Olympics posed “a very low risk” of accelerating the Zika virus spread around the world.

Thousands of athletes will come to Rio for the Paralympics that run from Sept. 7-18, which is still during Brazil’s winter, lessening the Zika risk.

MORE: Hope Solo banned 6 months after Olympic comments

Devon Allen weighs turning pro in track and field

Devon Allen
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University of Oregon hurdler and wide receiver Devon Allen said he “thinks” he’s turning pro in track, but also said he hasn’t really decided if his NCAA track career is finished Thursday.

“There’s not really much more I can do in college track other than break the collegiate record,” Allen said.

Allen, a University of Oregon junior, finished fifth in the Rio Olympic 110m hurdles on Aug. 16 after winning the Olympic Trials on July 9.

Allen can turn pro in track and field and still play football for the Ducks, so long as he keeps his track and field profits to prize money and not endorsement deals.

He’s definitely planning on playing for Oregon’s football team this season, perhaps even in the season opener Sept. 3.

As for track season next winter and spring, that’s looking unlikely. Allen noted that he has won NCAA individual and team titles.

The only missing piece is the NCAA record of 13.00 set by former world-record holder Renaldo Nehemiah. Allen’s personal best is 13.03.

It’s clear that Allen would like to be a professional in both track and football.

“The NFL is something I’ve been dreaming about doing, just like I dreamed about running in the Olympics,” said Allen, who caught nine passes for 94 yards last season, coming back from tearing knee ligaments in the Rose Bowl. “I kind of accomplished that Olympic dream, obviously, in four years, I want to win a gold medal, so that’s one more step to that dream. Now my next dream is to play in the NFL.”

VIDEO: Top track and field moments from Rio Olympics