Thomas Bach

IOC president expresses thoughts on Jesse Owens’ gold medal auction

Leave a comment

That one of Jesse Owens‘ four gold medals earned at the 1936 Olympics is going up for auction is a “very difficult decision” to accept, International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach said.

“[It has] an importance far beyond the sporting achievements of Jesse Owens, which is part of world history,” Bach told The Associated Press at an anti-doping conference in South Africa on Wednesday. “To put this up for an auction is for me a very difficult decision [to accept].”

It’s been known since July that one of Owens’ medals would be auctioned off. The news picked up buzz in the last week with more reports as the auction got closer. It will be sold to the highest bidder Dec. 7.

The IOC will not intervene in the sale, according to the AP.

An official with SCP Auctions, which will reportedly begin the auction Nov. 20, said in August he expected the medal to bring in “several hundred thousand dollars.” Another SCP official said he expected more than $1 million last week.

“We think this is a seven-figure piece,” SCP auctions president David Kohler told ESPN.com. “We expect to see a good deal of international interest and could see some institutions bidding. This is so much bigger than a piece of sports memorabilia. It’s a piece of history.”

The company does not know if the medal is from the 100m, the 200m, the long jump or the 4×100m relay, all won by Owens at the 1936 Berlin Olympics.

Owens triumphed in front of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler.

The medal is “a part of world heritage,” Bach told the AP.

Owens gifted the medal to entertainer Bill “Bojangles” Robinson after the 1936 Olympics, according to “Mr. Bojangles: The Biography of Bill Robinson.” It was consigned by the family of Robinson’s widow, according to SCP Auctions. Robinson gave Owens tap-dancing lessons, according to “Jesse Owens: A Biography.”

“It shows some wear, some handling wear,” SCP Auctions managing director Dan Imler said three months ago. “I would say a moderate degree … but it still presents very well.”

In 2010, 1980 U.S. Olympic hockey player Mark Wells sold his gold medal from the “Miracle on Ice” team for $310,700. Mike Eruzione sold his hockey stick from the U.S.-Russia game and his jersey from the following game against Finland for $262,900 and $286,800, respectively, to a 9-year-old boy named Seven in February.

Usain Bolt’s obsession with ‘Call of Duty’

Serena Williams eyes Australian Open return after pregnancy

Getty Images
Leave a comment

Serena Williams hopes to return from pregnancy (due date by the end of the summer) to defend her Australian Open title in January, according to Vogue.

“It’s the most outrageous plan,” Williams said, according to the report. “I just want to put that out there. That’s, like, three months after I give birth. I’m not walking anything back, but I’m just saying it’s pretty intense.”

Williams, a four-time Olympic gold medalist, won her 23rd Grand Slam singles title last January and, two months later, said she played that event while about two months pregnant.

Williams, 35, is already the oldest Grand Slam women’s singles champion in the Open Era. That’s by virtue not of her 2017 Australian Open title but of her 2016 Wimbledon crown.

She hopes to pass Margaret Court‘s record of 24 Grand Slaim singles titles, though Court won the majority of her events before the Open Era began in 1968.

“In this game you can go dark fast,” Williams said, according to the report. “If I lose, and I lose again, it’s like, she’s done. Especially since I’m not 20 years old. I’ll tell you this much: I won’t win less. Either I win, or I don’t play.”

As for another Olympics?

“I can’t promise that … Tokyo 2020 is a lot,” Williams said on Japanese TV on Jan. 28 after winning the Australian Open, while knowing she was already, secretly, two months pregnant.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Past two men’s champions out of U.S. Open

Vuelta a España TV, live stream schedule

Leave a comment

Less than a month after winning his fourth Tour de France, Chris Froome returns to headline the Vuelta a España, the final Grand Tour of the season, with daily live coverage on NBC Sports Gold’s Cycling Pass and the Olympic Channel: Home of Team USA.

Olympic Channel coverage will be live streamed on OlympicChannel.com, the Olympic Channel app, NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

NBCSN will also air encore broadcasts of select stages.

NBC Sports Gold coverage will be commercial-free.

Froome, eyeing his first Tour of Spain win after a trio of runners-up, is joined by Spaniard Alberto Contador, who has won every Grand Tour multiple times and is set to retire after this event.

Rounding out the marquee men is 2014 Tour de France champion Vincenzo Nibali, who also captured the Vuelta back in 2010.

Romain Bardet and Fabio Aru, who challenged Froome at the Tour de France last month, are also in the Vuelta field.

OlympicTalk is on Apple News. Favorite us!

MORE: Olympic champion, Tour de France runner up fails drug test

Day Time (ET) Network Stage
Saturday, Aug. 19 11:25 a.m.-1:30 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 1
Saturday, Aug. 19 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 1
Sunday, Aug. 20 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 2
Sunday, Aug. 20 12-2 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 2
Monday, Aug. 21 7:10 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 3
Monday, Aug. 21 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 3
Monday, Aug. 21 12 p.m. NBCSN Stage 3
Tuesday, Aug. 22 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 4
Tuesday, Aug. 22 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 4
Wednesday, Aug. 23 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 5
Wednesday, Aug. 23 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 5
Thursday, Aug. 24 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 6
Thursday, Aug. 24 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 6
Friday, Aug. 25 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 7
Friday, Aug. 25 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 7
Friday, Aug. 25 5 p.m. NBCSN Stage 7
Saturday, Aug. 26 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 8
Saturday, Aug. 26 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 8
Sunday, Aug. 27 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 9
Sunday, Aug. 27 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 9
Tuesday, Aug. 29 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 10
Tuesday, Aug. 29 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 10
Tuesday, Aug. 29 6:30 p.m. NBCSN Stage 10
Wednesday, Aug. 30 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 11
Wednesday, Aug. 30 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 11
Thursday, Aug. 31 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 12
Thursday, Aug. 31 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 12
Thursday, Aug. 31 1 p.m. NBCSN Stage 12
Friday, Sept. 1 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 13
Friday, Sept. 1 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 13
Saturday, Sept. 2 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 14
Saturday, Sept. 2 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 14
Sunday, Sept. 3 7:45 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 15
Sunday, Sept. 3 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 15
Tuesday, Sept. 5 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 16
Tuesday, Sept. 5 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 16
Tuesday, Sept. 5 9 p.m. NBCSN Stage 16
Wednesday, Sept. 6 6:25 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 17
Wednesday, Sept. 6 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 17
Thursday, Sept. 7 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 18
Thursday, Sept. 7 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 18
Friday, Sept. 8 9 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 19
Friday, Sept. 8 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 19
Saturday, Sept. 9 8:15 a.m.-12 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 20
Saturday, Sept. 9 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 20
Sunday, Sept. 10 10:55 a.m.-3 p.m. NBC Sports Gold Stage 21
Sunday, Sept. 10 1-3 p.m. Olympic Channel Stage 21
Sunday, Sept. 10 7 p.m. NBCSN Stage 21