Mary Cain

Mary Cain turns pro at 17

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U.S. middle distance phenom Mary Cain will not run collegiately.

Cain, 17, turned professional, she announced Friday.

“For the past couple of months, my family and I have been debating whether I should compete at a collegiate or professional level going forward,” Cain said, according to a press release. “I have decided, and am truly excited to announce, that I will be turning pro. I believe that, in the long run, this is the best way for me continue to develop as an athlete.”

It’s not a surprising move for the youngest American to make a World Championships team. Cain took 10th in the 1,500m in Moscow in August as the youngest woman ever to start a worlds final.

Cain turned pro earlier than previous U.S. running prodigies. Allyson Felix, who won an Olympic silver medal at 18, competed as a senior in high school. Alan Webb, who broke Jim Ryun‘s age-group records in high school from 1999-2001, turned pro at 19.

A younger U.S. runner has Cain beat in that department, though.

High school junior Alana Hadley qualified for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials earlier this month by running 2 hours, 41 minutes, 56 seconds at the Indianapolis Monumental Marathon on Nov. 2.

Cain, a senior at Bronxville (N.Y.) High, is in Monaco for the IAAF World Athletics Gala. She will still go to college, her father said, but will not be eligible to compete in NCAA competitions.

“How to proceed was always going to be a difficult choice,” said Cain’s father, Charles, according to a press release. “Mary is a straight-A student and will be pursuing a college education while competing. This remains a priority and we think this approach is the best way to balance her educational and athletic goals.”

Cain is coached by Alberto Salazar, who also coaches Olympic champion Mo Farah and Olympic silver medalist Galen Rupp in Oregon.

Cain’s agent will be Ricky Simms, who also represents Farah and Usain Bolt.

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Images from the Closing Ceremony of the 2018 Winter Olympics

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The 2018 Winter Olympics have officially come to a close. Check out some of the best photos from the Closing Ceremony in PyeongChang.

If you missed the live stream this morning, then be sure to tune into at 8:00p.m. EST / 5:00p.m. PST to watch NBC’s primetime coverage, or stream it on NBCOlympics.com. 

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PyeongChang late night roundup

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The final gold medalist of these 2018 Winter Olympic Games was a familiar one, and so too is the country which she represents.

Norway’s Marit Bjoergen dominated the field in a sport that she has stood at the top of for years, winning the women’s 30km mass start in just over 80 minutes – almost two minutes ahead of the silver medalist. Bjoergen is the most decorated Winter Olympian of all time with 15 medals.

Another expected gold medalist, OAR, also did the job today. But in much more dramatic fashion. The Olympic Athletes from Russia looked down and out late in the third period of regulation against Germany, but were able to capture the gold in stunning fashion.


Hockey: OAR win gold in overtime 

With just a minute left in regulation, it looked as if Germany were going to claim the most stunning win of the century. Trailing 2-3 and down a player in the power play, Nikita Gusev flicked the puck into the German net to force overtime.

OAR def. GER 4-3 (OT): Highlights

Halfway into overtime, it was OAR’s turn to go up a man on a power play. Kirill Kaprizov was the man who scored the winning goal and secured the gold medal.

OAR vs. GER full recap available here 

Cross-Country: Bjoergen wins 15th overall Winter Olympics medal 

37 year-old Marit Bjoergen dominated the women’s 30km mass start field to win her 15th overall Winter Olympics medal. The Norwegian was on her own for nearly the entire race.

Austria’s Teresa Stadlober was in a commanding position to win the silver medal until the 20th kilometer, where she strayed onto the wrong section of the course. Whether it was a lapse in combination or a mix of mental and psychological exhaustion, the Austrian’s race took a dive from there, finishing in ninth place.

Krista Parmakoski of Finland led the chase to win the silver, whilst Sweden’s Stina Nilsson outsprinted Ingvild Oestberg to win the bronze.

Jessie Diggins, who will be the flag bearer for the U.S. in the Closing Ceremony, finished in seventh place. This was likely Diggins’ final Olympic race.

Women’s 30km mass start full recap available here