Mary Cain

Mary Cain turns pro at 17

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U.S. middle distance phenom Mary Cain will not run collegiately.

Cain, 17, turned professional, she announced Friday.

“For the past couple of months, my family and I have been debating whether I should compete at a collegiate or professional level going forward,” Cain said, according to a press release. “I have decided, and am truly excited to announce, that I will be turning pro. I believe that, in the long run, this is the best way for me continue to develop as an athlete.”

It’s not a surprising move for the youngest American to make a World Championships team. Cain took 10th in the 1,500m in Moscow in August as the youngest woman ever to start a worlds final.

Cain turned pro earlier than previous U.S. running prodigies. Allyson Felix, who won an Olympic silver medal at 18, competed as a senior in high school. Alan Webb, who broke Jim Ryun‘s age-group records in high school from 1999-2001, turned pro at 19.

A younger U.S. runner has Cain beat in that department, though.

High school junior Alana Hadley qualified for the 2016 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials earlier this month by running 2 hours, 41 minutes, 56 seconds at the Indianapolis Monumental Marathon on Nov. 2.

Cain, a senior at Bronxville (N.Y.) High, is in Monaco for the IAAF World Athletics Gala. She will still go to college, her father said, but will not be eligible to compete in NCAA competitions.

“How to proceed was always going to be a difficult choice,” said Cain’s father, Charles, according to a press release. “Mary is a straight-A student and will be pursuing a college education while competing. This remains a priority and we think this approach is the best way to balance her educational and athletic goals.”

Cain is coached by Alberto Salazar, who also coaches Olympic champion Mo Farah and Olympic silver medalist Galen Rupp in Oregon.

Cain’s agent will be Ricky Simms, who also represents Farah and Usain Bolt.

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Hilary Knight: Heavy is the crown for the selfie queen

Hilary Knight/Twitter
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Following three-time Olympian Hilary Knight on social media means pictures. Specifically, selfies.

Lots and lots of selfies.

The forward easily qualifies as the selfie queen of the U.S. women’s Olympic hockey team. But it’s not because the 5-foot-11 Knight doesn’t try to share the photo duties documenting these Olympic moments with her teammates.

“I always ask someone else to do it, and they’re like, ‘No, no you just do it,'” Knight said with a laugh. “Just because of my arms. I have the angle or something figured out.

Knight stayed busy the night of the opening ceremonies at the Pyeongchang Games.

She’s also been documenting life in the athletes’ village.

Knight says she startles herself when she opens up her SnapChat app and finds it on selfie mode.

“I’m like, ‘Oh my gosh, what’s going on there?” she said. “But I feel badly for posting all the selfies. At the same time, we’re trying to capture all these memories we have together because they’re something special.”

 

Anna Gasser edges out Jamie Anderson for big air gold

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With a pair of extremely progressive tricks, Austria’s Anna Gasser has become the first-ever Olympic champion in women’s snowboard big air.

Gasser landed all three of her jumps in the big air final, but it was the last one — a cab double cork 1080 — that knocked Jamie Anderson out of the top spot and gave Gasser the win.

Anderson ended up with a silver medal. It’s her second medal of these Olympics and the third medal of her career.

New Zealand’s Zoi Sadowski-Synnott took bronze.

Read the full story and watch video at NBCOlympics.com