Paolo Bernardi

U.S. women’s ski jumping coach Paolo Bernardi quits

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Paolo Bernardi quit three months before he would become the first U.S. Olympic women’s ski jumping team coach.

The Italian Bernardi, 41, had coached the U.S. team since 2011, the same year women’s ski jumping was officially added to the Olympics after a long fight to join men at the Winter Games.

A message was posted to Bernardi’s Facebook account last week, then deleted.

“I resign for personal reasons and it was a hard decision….I keep loving and following this sport and I hope to find another team soon that can give me the motivation to start again,” was posted, according to the International Ski Federation website.

Bernardi, whose family lives in Italy, “was forced to re-evaluate his situation” after he requested an international-based assistant and was not granted one, according to USA Todaywhich also cited “demanding travel” and “an all-consuming job.”

“It was the best decision for myself and for my team because our roads were not going the same direction anymore,” Bernardi told the newspaper. “After 2 ½ years eventually we are not on the same page anymore, and so I had to quit.”

He went through a tough season with the death of his mother in February.

“I did too much,” Bernardi told the newspaper. “When you drive one car at the highest speed possible for 2 ½ years, sooner or later you’re going to hit the wall and I’m really afraid I’m going to hit the wall. Before it’s too late I want to take a break and slow down.”

Bernardi helped guide the team’s star, Sarah Hendrickson, 19, to the 2011-12 World Cup season title and the 2013 World Championship.

Hendrickson tore the ACL, MCL and meniscus in her right knee in an Aug. 21 crash but was walking normally two months later. She’s hoping to be ready to compete in Sochi on Feb. 11.

“She was looking forward to starting again with me,” Bernardi told USA Today. “We’ll see, I’m always available for her if I don’t find another job.

“She’s the kind of athlete who knows exactly what she has to do. When she gets back in January she’s going to be like before. I don’t see any problem.”

The ski jumping World Cup begins in Lillehammer, Norway, on Dec. 7.

Bernardi was known for wearing his emotions on his jacket sleeve.

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Ryan Lochte: Katie Ledecky beats me in practice

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We already knew Katie Ledecky can beat the boys in practice, even an Olympic champion.

One of the many takeaways from this week’s Sports Illustrated profile of Ledecky is that she has beaten 11-time Olympic medalist Ryan Lochte in practice.

Ledecky and Lochte may rep different swim clubs — Ledecky in Washington, D.C., and Lochte in Charlotte — but they both take trips to the U.S. Olympic Training Center in Colorado Springs, Colo., for altitude training.

“She swims like a guy,” Lochte said after training with Ledecky in Colorado Springs in March, according to SI. “I’ve never seen a female swimmer like that. … Her times are becoming good for a guy. She’s beating me now, and I’m like, What’s going on?

When Ledecky broke the women’s 1500m freestyle world record for the third time at the August 2014 Pan Pacific Championships, her time of 15:28.36 was .01 faster than Lochte’s 1500m free time at the 2004 U.S. Olympic Trials (one of the rare instances Lochte swam a 1500m free).

Ledecky has since re-broken the women’s 1500m free world record twice more, bringing it down to 15:25.48.

“I trained with her in Colorado once, and she made me look like I was stopping,” Lochte reportedly told media on his 31st birthday, Aug. 3 at the World Championships in Kazan, Russia. “She flew by me.”

MORE: Shirley Babashoff bows to Katie Ledecky

Jennie Finch to manage baseball team for one day

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Athens Olympic softball champion Jennie Finch will manage the Bridgeport Bluefish, an independent minor-league baseball team on Sunday and, reportedly, become the first woman to manage a men’s pro baseball team.

Finch, a pitcher, retired from softball in 2010, two years after her sport’s Olympic farewell in Beijing, where she and the U.S. took silver behind Japan.

Finch has been an advocate for softball’s return to the Olympics, which could happen in Tokyo 2020.

The International Olympic Committee is expected to decide in August if baseball and softball, among four other sports, will be added for the Tokyo Games.

Finch, who is married to former MLB pitcher Casey Daigle, is also known for having struck out Albert Pujols.

MORE: Jennie Finch, Lisa Fernandez weigh in on Mo’ne Davis

Looking fwd to guest managing the Bridgeport Bluefish this Sunday! ⚾️ #Baseball #BridgeportBluefish

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