James Magnussen

Australian Olympic Committee bars athletes from ‘swaying,’ ‘rambling’

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Australia amended its alcohol policy for its athletes at the Sochi Olympics.

Yes, they can drink, but they are forbidden from intoxicated acts such as “swaying, staggering or falling down,” the nation’s Olympic Committee said Tuesday.

This is likely, at least partially, in response to the behavior of some Australian men’s swimmers at the 2012 Olympics.

Here are the highlights of its position on the Olympic Team and alcohol:

Team members are not permitted to be present in the Olympic Village or other
designated Team locations if they are intoxicated and displaying conduct which may be
inappropriate or disruptive to others. This conduct includes:

* Being disorderly or argumentative;

* Being bad tempered, aggressive or using offensive language;

* Swaying, staggering or falling down;

* Speech which is loud and boisterous;

* Having rambling conversations;

* Having difficulty in paying attention or comprehending others;

* Annoying fellow Team members and others; or

* Other conduct deemed by the Chef de Mission to be inconsistent with the
standards expected of a Team member.

– The possession, service or consumption of alcohol by any Team member within the
Olympic Village or other designated Team locations is not permitted. This includes the
consumption of alcohol served by a third party such as other Olympic Teams;


– The consumption of alcohol on the Team Charter Flight returning to Australia is not
permitted. A Team member who is intoxicated may be refused permission to board the
Team Charter Flight.

“What this policy is about is not a ban on alcohol, it’s not about stopping people celebrating after events,” said Kitty Chiller, 2016 Australian Olympic Team Chef de Mission. “This is about us providing a totally 100 percent high performance focused environment to allow athletes to best prepare for their event whether they are competing on Day 1 or Day 16 of the Games.”

Australia is by no means a winter sports power, but it is gaining a little bit of a steam. It has won medals at the last five Winter Olympics, including three (two gold) in 2010.

Its stars in Sochi are expected to be Olympic champions Dale Begg-Smith (moguls), Lydia Lassila (aerials) and Torah Bright (snowboarding) and world snowboarding champions Alex Pullin and Holly Crawford.

Past Soviet Olympic champions to hockey team: ‘Don’t let Russia down’

Boules bids for 2024 Olympic inclusion

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 (AP) — The sport of boules has launched a bid to be included in the 2024 Olympics.

The Bowls Sports World Confederation, which is recognized by the International Olympic Committee, is campaigning on behalf of three disciplines: the French petanque, the Boule Lyonnaise and the Raffa, a version of the game popular in Italy.

According to the international world games association, about 20 million people regularly play boules in France and Italy, and more than 2 million players are licensed in 150 other countries.

Under new IOC rules, Olympic host cities can propose the addition of one or more sports to their games. Paris and Rome are among the five cities bidding for the 2024 Games, along with Los Angeles, Budapest and Hamburg.

MORE: Complete 2024 Olympic bidding coverage

South Korean rhythmic gymnast throws another acrobatic first pitch (video)

Pitching mound
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South Korean Olympic gymnast Shin Soo-ji made a triumphant return to the mound over the weekend and outdid her acrobatic 2013 first pitch.

Shin, who finished 12th in rhythmic gymnastics at Beijing 2008, added another gymnastics move to her wind-up before tossing a little bit high.

MORE GYMNASTICS: Analyzing U.S. women’s World Championships roster