Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn suffers another ACL injury in training crash


Lindsey Vonn reinjured the knee she blew out at the World Championships in a training crash on Tuesday, her publicist said in an email.

“Lindsey sustained a mild strain to her right knee, a partial tear to her right ACL, minor facial abrasions and scapular contusions from her fall,” Lewis Kay wrote Wednesday. “She needs to rest for a few days and then will pursue aggressive physical therapy and will determine the next time she is able to compete after seeing how she responds to the treatment.

We will provide a further update when new information becomes available.”

Vonn suffered a torn ACL, MCL and lateral tibial plateau fracture on Feb. 5, crashing in the World Championships super-G in Schladming, Austria (video here). The Olympic downhill champion had surgery five days later and planned to return to competition nine months after that.

The first Olympic Alpine skiing event is less than three months away on Feb. 10.

Before the crash at Copper Mountain, Colo., on Tuesday, she was expected to return to competitive skiing for the first time at a World Cup stop in Beaver Creek beginning Nov. 29 and enter as many as four events at the Sochi Olympics.

Vonn’s teammate raced at Olympics 18 days after ACL tear

“I believe Lindsey is the kind of person that’s going to work as hard as anybody can work at it and will recover as strong as anyone,” U.S. Alpine skier Ted Ligety told The Associated Press. “She has the mind-frame to come back strong. If it’s possible for her to get out there and compete, she’ll be out there competing. And when she competes, she normally wins.”

Vonn returned to skiing on snow in Portillo, Chile, on Aug. 31 (video here) and said shortly after that her right knee wasn’t swollen and that she couldn’t tell which knee was injured anymore.

She felt so good that she considered racing in the season-opening giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, on Oct. 26 but opted against it three days before the race.

“I’ve only been on snow for a few days, but I’m already almost right back where I was,” she told Matt Lauer on “TODAY” on Oct. 28 (video here).

She trained downhill for the first time since her crash on Nov. 6 and, two days later, said she felt healthy enough to win a World Cup super-G race.

Vonn recently said she’s reluctantly been wearing a protective knee brace under doctor’s orders, according to The Associated Press.

“It’s in my best interest to play it safe,” Vonn said, according to the AP. “I compromised and said that as long as I don’t have to wear [the brace] for the Olympics, I’ll be fine.”

Vonn, a three-time Olympian, is three wins away from matching Austrian Annemarie Moser-Proell for the most World Cup victories by a woman with 62. The overall record is held by Sweden’s Ingemar Stenmark at 86.

Athletes attempting comebacks for Sochi Olympics

Her career has been filled with championship crystal globes but also injuries long before her World Championships crash.

In 2006, she crashed in a downhill training run at the Torino Olympics, suffering a bruised hip, but competed two days later and finished eighth.

In 2007, she crashed in a slalom training run and suffered a sprained ACL.

In 2009, she cut her right thumb on a broken champagne bottle celebrating a World Championship. She needed surgery to repair a cut tendon. Later in December 2009, she crashed during a World Cup giant slalom run in December and bruised her arm but skied through it.

In 2010, she bruised her shin a week before the Olympics, causing “excruciating” pain when she tried to put on a ski boot. She skied through it, winning the Vancouver downhill and taking bronze in the super-G. She crashed in the Olympic giant slalom, breaking her right pinkie, and also crashed in the super combined.

Video: Vonn’s Vancouver downhill gold

In 2011, she crashed during a training run one week before the World Championships, suffering a concussion. She raced anyway, finishing second in the downhill and seventh in the super-G.

In 2012, she suffered from an intestinal illness and took a three-week break from the World Cup tour over the holidays.

Lindsey Vonn, Tiger Woods chat with John Elway before Chiefs-Broncos

Yuzuru Hanyu sets short program record; Wagner in medal territory at NHK Trophy

Yuzuru Hanyu
Leave a comment

Olympic champion Yuzuru Hanyu set the new short program world record – raising his own world record by about five points from when he set it in Sochi – to lead the men’s field at the NHK Trophy in Nagano, Japan.

The 20-year-old landed two clean quads, one in combination, and a triple Axel in front of a home crowd. In his other Grand Prix appearance, two of those three jumps received zero points.

China’s Jin Boyang and Hanyu’s countryman Takahito Mura sit in second and third place, respectively, though Hanyu has built a 10-point lead heading into tonight’s free program. Jin landed two quads and a triple Axel cleanly, a program that surely would lead in any other field, while Mura was clean, too.

By holding off the competition, which seems likely, Hanyu can clinch a berth into the Grand Prix Final, where he is reigning champion.

Richard Dornbush and Grant Hochstein are the only U.S. men in the competition, as Jason Brown withdrew due to a back sprain. Dornbush is seventh and Hochstein is eighth before tonight’s free program.

2015 Worlds silver medalist Satoko Miyahara of Japan leads the ladies’ field after the short program over the other Japanese skater highlighting the field, Mao Asada (currently fourth), and two of the U.S.’ skaters. Courtney Hicks is second while Ashley Wagner is third. Vancouver Olympian Mirai Nagasu is fifth.

Miyahara landed three triples in her short program, compared to Hicks and Wagner, who both turned out of their planned triple-triple combinations. Nagasu was relatively clean in her short program. Asada fell on her signature triple Axel attempt and singled her planned triple Lutz.

Asada made her return to competition this season after winning the 2014 World title but skipping the subsequent season. Both Asada and Wagner can clinch berths to the Grand Prix Final by winning medals of any color in tonight’s free program. More on that process here.

It seems it is impossible to discuss figure skating results without mentioning the Russian dominance in the ladies’ field; however, in the short program, their competitors sat a lackluster seventh, ninth, and 11th in a field of 11. Russia’s Maria Artemieva, Alena Leonova and Anna Pogorilaya each had at least one fall in their short programs.

Canadian pairs team Meaghan Duhamel and Eric Radford are in the hunt for their ninth straight international win and a Grand Prix Final berth – a feat made a lot easier after the withdrawl of Olympic pairs champs Tatyana Volosozhar and Maksim Trankov of Russia. The Canadian pair leads over Alexa Scimeca and Chris Knierim of the United States, currently second, also looking for a berth with a medal in Japan.

Men’s free skate — Saturday, 2:30 a.m. ET (start order here)
Women’s free skate — Saturday, 5:35 a.m. ET (start order here)

Russia vows to follow all WADA recommendations on doping

Russia Olympic Committee
Leave a comment

MOSCOW (AP) Russia says it will follow any recommendations from the World Anti-Doping Agency to clean up its own troubled drug-testing body.

A WADA commission’s report this month accused the Russian anti-doping agency, RUSADA, of covering up failed drug tests by top athletes. RUSADA was suspended by WADA following the report’s publication.

Russian Sports Minister Vitaly Mutko met WADA director general David Howman in Germany on Thursday.

According to an account of the meeting posted by the ministry, Mutko said Russia would “follow all recommendations from WADA aimed at the necessary transformations in the activities and structure of RUSADA.”

The ministry also quoted Howman as saying he welcomed Mutko’s assurances “with pleasure.”

Russia’s track and field team was also suspended this month by the IAAF and could miss next year’s Olympics in Brazil.

MORE: Ashton Eaton named male IAAF Athlete of the Year