Lindsey Vonn

Lindsey Vonn delays surgery in hopes of skiing at Sochi Olympics

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Lindsey Vonn will have to reconstruct her right ACL, but if she did it now, it would pretty much end her chances of skiing at the Olympics in February.

So, the Olympic downhill champion is skiing on. She took more super-G practice runs at Vail, Colo., on Sunday morning and spoke to The Associated Press.

“Might as well see how long it holds up,” Vonn told the AP. “Not a lot of options. In the end, surgery is going to have to happen.”

Vonn would have proceeded the same way even if it wasn’t an Olympic season, she told the AP. Not only is she keen on defending her Olympic title, but Vonn is also three wins away from matching Austrian Annemarie Moser-Proell‘s record of 62 career World Cup victories.

Vonn, 29, partially tore her right ACL in a training crash on Nov. 19 in Copper Mountain, Colo. It’s the same knee she blew out in a crash at the World Championships in February.

That delayed her planned comeback at Beaver Creek, Colo., this weekend.

She will travel to Lake Louise, Alberta, this week to train downhill with hopes of skiing in races beginning Friday.

“Definitely with this current situation, there was no way I could’ve skied that bumpy, steep course (Beaver Creek),” Vonn told the AP. “I know it was the right decision. That gives me a peace of mind. I’m trying to look forward to Lake Louise and cheer for my team.”

Video: Lara Gut wins Beaver Creek super-G

Simone Biles welcomed home with cheerleaders, band, police escort (video)

Simone Biles
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The celebration began the moment Simone Biles walked into Bush Airport in Houston on Wednesday.

Biles, after winning four gold medals at the Rio Olympics, arrived in her home state of Texas to the sounds of a band, sights of Houston Texans cheerleaders and much more.

Mayor Sylvester Turner declared Wednesday to be “Simone Biles Day” in Houston, handing the gymnast a paper proclamation.

“Hi guys, I’m Simone Biles, and I can’t thank everyone [enough] in all of Houston for coming out to see me today and to welcome me from Rio,” she said, laughing, on a podium at the airport. “I don’t know what else to say, I’m nervous, and I love you guys.”

Later, Biles was given a parade in her hometown of Spring, a Houston suburb, with a police escort.

Biles and the Final Five’s first stop on the way home from Rio was New York, where they went on a media tour earlier this week. They reached the top of the Empire State Building, visited Jimmy Fallon and saw “Hamilton.”

The Final Five will reunite for a USA Gymnastics tour of 36 cities, beginning Sept. 15.

MORE: Home videos of Simone Biles doing gymnastics

Gwen Jorgensen the latest Olympic triathlon star to move up to marathon

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When Olympic triathlon champion Gwen Jorgensen lines up for her first 26.2-mile race at the New York City Marathon on Nov. 6, it will be hard to judge her performance.

Perhaps the best measure will be her time versus those of previous Olympic triathlon medalists in their marathon debuts.

Jorgensen is recognized as the greatest female runner among top-level female triathletes, perhaps of all time, with an ability to make up deficits of more than one minute on the 10km run after swimming 1,500 meters and biking 40 kilometers.

Swiss Nicola Spirig, the 2012 Olympic triathlon gold medalist, made her marathon debut in 2014 in 2:42:53. Sprig, though, had more long-distance racing experience than Jorgensen, including a half marathon.

Jorgensen, 30 and a former University of Wisconsin distance runner and swimmer, has never tackled more than 10 miles in training, according to The New York Times.

“When you ask athletes what they want to do after they win gold or the Super Bowl, they say they want to go to the happiest place on earth,” Jorgensen said, according to the newspaper. “Running is my happiest place. It’s my Disneyland.”

Portugal’s Vanessa Fernandes shared triathlon’s longest top-level international winning streak before Jorgensen strung together 13 wins in a row.

Fernandes, the 2008 Olympic triathlon silver medalist, clocked 2:31:25 in her first marathon, but it came in 2015, four years after her last elite international triathlon.

The 2015 New York City Marathon women’s winning time was 2:24:25 by Kenyan Mary Keitany. The top American, Laura Thweatt, ran 2:28:23.

This year’s American field may be stronger, with Olympic track distance runners Molly Huddle and Kim Conley making their marathon debuts.

Other Olympic triathlon medalists, including 2004 gold medalist Kate Allen and 2000 silver medalist Michellie Jones, have moved up to the Ironman — a 2.4-mile swim, 112-mile bike and a marathon.

In 2014, Jorgensen said she didn’t see herself ever doing an Ironman.

MORE: What Jorgensen asked Ironman star Mirinda Carfrae