Tom Daley

Diver Tom Daley says he’s dating a man


Diver Tom Daley, one of Great Britain’s most celebrated Olympians, said that he is dating a man.

“One thing I’ve never really felt that comfortable talking about are my relationships,” Daley said in a YouTube video published Monday. “I’ve been dating girls, and I’ve never really had a serious relationship to talk about. And, now I kind of feel ready to talk about my relationships. Come spring, this year, my life changed, massively, when I met someone. They make me feel so happy, so safe, and everything just feels great. Well, that someone is a guy. It did take me by surprise a little bit. It was always in the back of my head that something like that could happen. But it wasn’t until spring this year that something just clicked. It felt right.

“Of course I still fancy girls. But right now, I’m dating a guy, and I couldn’t be happier.”

Daley is the 2009 world champion and 2012 Olympic bronze medalist on the platform. He has 2.4 million Twitter followers, more than any other athlete in a sport whose biggest event is the Olympics, save Usain Bolt.

Daley, 19, said his life has been a bit of a roller coaster the last few years. He lost his dad to cancer at age 40 in 2011 and then won a bronze medal at the London Games as one of the host nation’s biggest stars.

Four-time U.S. Olympic champion diver Greg Louganis is also gay. Australian 2008 Olympic platform champion Matthew Mitcham and two-time 2004 Olympic medalist Matthew Helm have said they are, too.

In April, NBA center Jason Collins became the first active male athlete in a major North American team sport to come out as gay.

“In an ideal world, I wouldn’t be doing this video because it shouldn’t matter,” Daley said. “But, recently, I was misquoted in an interview. It made me feel really angry and frustrated. Emotions that I’ve never felt before when reading something about myself. For me, honesty is something that I really do believe in. I’ve always been honest. I may have been vague in some of my answers, but I’ve always been honest.”

Daley said he’s heading to Houston, Texas, for a training camp through Christmas.

“I’m still Tom,” he said. “I still want to win a gold medal in Rio 2016 for Great Britain. I’m still as motivated as ever to do that.”

Bob Bowman: Nobody has filled Michael Phelps’ void in swimming

‘Olympic Pride, American Prejudice’ film on Berlin 1936 on the way

Jesse Owens
Leave a comment

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice,” a documentary on 18 African-American Olympians at the Berlin 1936 Games, is set to be screened in the spring and be narrated and executive produced by Blair Underwood, according to Variety.

The group of 18, headlined by Jesse Owens, competed in the face of Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler on the brink of World War II.

Trailers for the film are here and here.

From the film’s website:

“Olympic Pride, American Prejudice is a feature length documentary exploring the trials and triumphs of 18 African American Olympians in 1936. Set against the strained and turbulent atmosphere of a racially divided America, which was torn between boycotting Hitler’s Olympics or participating in the Third Reich’s grandest affair, the film follows 16 men and two women before, during and after their heroic turn at the Summer Olympic Games in Berlin. They represented a country that considered them second class citizens and competed in a country that rolled out the red carpet in spite of an undercurrent of Aryan superiority and anti-Semitism. They carried the weight of a race on their shoulders and did the unexpected with grace and dignity.

The athletes experienced things that they were not expecting—applause, warm welcomes, integrated Olympic villages and the respect of their competitors. They were world heroes yet returned home to a short-lived glory. This story is complicated. This story is triumphant but unheralded.”

MORE: See ‘Race’ film poster

Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims’ families detail massacre in documentary

Leave a comment

Family members of the Munich 1972 Olympic attack victims “described the extent of the cruelty” in interviews for “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” an upcoming documentary on the massacre, according to The New York Times.

Eleven Israeli athletes and officials were killed after being taken hostage by a Palestinian group in the athletes’ village nearly 40 years ago, with nine dying in a failed rescue attempt.

In 1992, widows of two of the victims learned details of how the athletes and officials were treated — including via graphic photographs — and recently spoke publicly about it, according to the newspaper.

“What they did is that they cut off his genitals through his underwear and abused him,” Ilana Romano said through a translator of husband Yossef Romano, an Olympic weightlifter, according to the newspaper. “Can you imagine the nine others sitting around tied up? They watched this.”

The documentary “Munich 1972 & Beyond,” announced earlier this year, is set to be released in early 2016. Here’s an interview with one of the film’s producers.

In 2014, it was announced that a $2.3 million memorial in Munich was planned to remember the victims, with the International Olympic Committee contributing $250,000.

At Rio 2016, a moment of remembrance will be held during the Closing Ceremony and a special mourning area will be in the Olympic village to honor those who have died during an Olympic Games.

PHOTOS: Munich 1972 Olympic sites, including massacre site