Mikaela Shiffrin

Mikaela Shiffrin says ‘next Lindsey Vonn’ talk unfair to Vonn

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Showers of praise keep raining on U.S. skier Mikaela Shiffrin, but perhaps comparisons to Lindsey Vonn are not the way to go.

“When they say I’m the next Lindsey Vonn, they are shooing her out the door, and I don’t think that’s fair,” Shiffrin told TODAY.com. “Imagine being her, reading that someone is the next Lindsey Vonn — it’s like saying, ‘Get out of the way, there’s no room for two Lindsey Vonns.’”

Shiffrin, of Vail, Colo., made her first World Cup giant slalom podium in nearby Beaver Creek on Sunday. She’s just starting to get her feet wet in the giant slalom after ascending to the top in slalom last year. Shiffrin won the World Championship in the slalom and led the World Cup standings in the event.

Shiffrin has said she wants to be an all-around skier contending for the overall World Cup title, which Vonn has won four times. It’s well known that Shiffrin and Vonn are different types of skiers — Shiffrin competing in (for now) only technical events, Vonn focusing on speed races.

Vonn is expected to train in Lake Louise, Alberta, this week ahead of World Cup speed races there beginning Friday. The Olympic downhill champion has said she hopes to race at a course nicknamed “Lake Lindsey” for her overwhelming success there over the years.

Shiffrin’s next race is expected to be a giant slalom in St. Moritz, Switzerland, on Dec. 15, if she sticks with her plan of racing only giant slalom and slalom this season.

“[Vonn has] been one of my greatest idols for really long time, and it’s even cooler that she’s one of my teammates,” Shffrin told TODAY.com. “I appreciate who she is and what she’s done for the sport. But she’s not done — she’s not even really close to done. Let her have her success and let me have my own — just call me Mikaela Shiffrin.”

Shiffrin’s admiration of Vonn included getting tongue-tied when Vonn introduced herself at a training session a few days before a race at Spindleruv Mlyn, Czech Republic, in March 2011.

“I was awkward and she must have felt like, ‘Who the heck is this girl?,”‘ Shiffrin told the Denver Post. “But it was really cool. I was like, ‘I just met my hero, oh, my gosh.’

“She said: ‘You can ask me whatever you need. I remember my first time in a World Cup, it was pretty dumbfounding, so if you have any questions, ask me.’ Of course I didn’t. I didn’t want to get in her way, but just the gesture — it sounded like she genuinely meant it.”

Vonn, who is 11 years older than Shiffrin, has said they’ve painted their nails together.

In January 2012, Vonn praised Shiffrin in a blog for the Denver Post.

“She’s a huge talent and she’s got a good head on her shoulders,” Vonn wrote. “To have success at that age, you need the right people around you when you’re growing up, you have to have talent and you need everything to fall into place at the right time.”

Lindsey Vonn delays surgery in hopes of skiing at Sochi Olympics

Miracle re-dub: USA win gold in Olympic hockey

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Feb. 22 has proven to be a day bringing good cheer to American hockey.

Exactly 38 years ago to this day, Herb Brooks guided the United States men’s hockey team to an improbable Olympic gold medal, putting an end to the Soviet Union’s four straight hockey golds.

History does have a way of repeating itself.

Tonight, the U.S. women’s team’s Olympic anguish turned to triumph after they beat arch-rivals Canada 3-2 in a shootout thriller. In doing so, the American women snapped Canada’s streak of four consecutive Olympic gold medals.

It was only four years ago when the Americans suffered a heartbreaking defeat to Canada in Sochi, losing in overtime. They wouldn’t allow themselves to forget it.

It was that memory that pushed Team USA in this tournament, who were destined to take on their bitter northern rivals. Like Herb Brooks’ team, the U.S. women’s team showed tremendous character to fight back in the third period when they were down 1-2, and again when they were down in the shootout.

A beautifully choreographed penalty shot from Jocelyne Lamoreux-Davidson, backed up by 20-year old Maddie Rooney’s game winning save, that sealed Team USA’s historic run.

Four years ago was Canada’s time. Tonight, it’s America’s time.

 

 

Golden feeling: US finally tops Canada in women’s hockey

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The United States erased the horrors of past performances with a shootout win against Canada to capture the gold medal.

Joceleyne Lamoureux-Davidson pulled off an incredible deke in the sixth round, while Maddie Rooney closed the door on Meghan Agosta as the U.S. won for the first time since the ’98 Nagano games.

The Americans needed a goal in the fourth inning as Melodie Daoust lit the lamp for Canada, but Amanda Kessel answered. The sister of two-time Stanley cup champion Phil Kessel snapped a wrist shot over the glove of Shannon Szabados to keep the dream alive for the U.S.

Trailing 2-1 in the third period, Monique Lamoureux-Morando converted a breakaway to knot the score 2-2 to force the 20 minute overtime period that preceded the prolonged shootout. Kelly Pannek took advantage of a poor Canadian line change and found No. 7 waiting at the opposition’s blue line.

Hilary Knight scored her second of the tournament to open up the scoring at 19:35 of the first period. Knight redirected Sidney Morin’s shot to give the U.S. a 1-0 lead on its third power play of the first 20 minutes.

See more and watch video highlights at NBCOlympics.com