Elana Meyers

U.S. sweeps women’s bobsled in Park City (video)

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U.S. Bobsled has been stellar to start the season, but it’s never been stronger than Saturday.

The U.S. swept the medals in Park City, Utah.

Elana Meyers and Aja Evans won in a two-run time of 1 minute, 38.61 seconds, followed by Jamie Greubel and Lolo Jones and Jazmine Fenlator and Lauryn Williams, who tied for silver in 1:39.24.

It’s the first time since Feb. 17, 2001, that the U.S. swept a women’s bobsled World Cup podium, according to Infostrada. That was also in Park City, one year before the Olympic debut of women’s bobsled.

“The greatest feeling today isn’t necessarily the gold medal,” Meyers said in the awards area. “It’s the fact that the three of us [teams] are up here together.”

The U.S. Bobsled Federation mixed up the second and third sled pairings from Friday’s race, where the U.S. placed first, second and fourth.

The track and field Olympians Jones and Williams replaced Katie Eberling and Emily Azevedo, respectively.

Evans and Eberling are considered favorites to make the U.S. Olympic Team. Jones and the 2010 Olympian Azevedo are thought to be vying for the third and final push athlete spot.

“It feels great to be on the podium,” said Jones, who won her first World Cup medal of the season. “With bobsled you never know when you are going to be on the podium and how long it will be before you are back on again. It makes you cherish the moments when you are doing well. Our drivers are doing outstanding this year.”

The bobsled rookie Williams won a bronze medal in her World Cup debut Saturday.

“It has been really fun to learn this whole process,” said Williams, the 2004 Olympic 100m silver medalist. “I got on the line and said, ‘I don’t want to disappoint Jazmine.’ I’m a rookie and I have to do this.”

The U.S. Olympic Team will be named in mid-January. Push athletes are chosen via discretionary selections, though World Cup results play a role in the decision-making process.

Meyers took the solo World Cup overall lead with the win, moving ahead of Canadian Olympic and world champion Kaillie Humphries. Humphries finished seventh, her worst result in nearly two years.

The U.S. has now won five of six men’s and women’s bobsled races this season. The Park City World Cup wraps up with a four-man bobsled later Saturday.

The women’s bobsled World Cup continues in Lake Placid, N.Y., next week. The sled pairings are expected to be announced midweek.

“All in all, I feel pretty good going into the rest of the season because we have a lot of room for improvement,” Evans said.

Park City Women’s Bobsled
1. Elana Meyers/Aja Evans (USA)
2. Jamie Greubel/Lolo Jones (USA) 1:39.24
2. Jazmine Fenlator/Lauryn Williams (USA) 1:39.24

Oldest man to carry Olympic torch

Michael Phelps to testify at congressional anti-doping hearing

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 03:  Michael Phelps of the United States speaks with the media during a press conference at the Main Press Centre ahead of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games on August 3, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Chris Graythen/Getty Images)
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Michael Phelps is one of five witnesses called to testify at a congressional hearing looking at ways to improve the international anti-doping system in Washington, D.C., on Tuesday.

Phelps will be joined by:

Adam Nelson, 2004 U.S. Olympic shot put champion
Travis Tygart, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO
Dr. Richard Budgett, IOC Medical and Scientific Director
Rob Koehler, World Anti-Doping Agency Deputy Director General

The House Committee on Energy and Commerce’s Subcommittee on Oversight and Investigations is examining the state of the international anti-doping system, challenges it faces and ways it can be improved before the 2018 Olympics.

“The Olympic Games represent the greatest athletes in the world, and we want to preserve the integrity of competition, and ensure clean sport,” subcommittee chairman Rep. Tim Murphy (R-Pa.) said in a press release. “This will be an important discussion to protect the revered distinction both the Olympics Games and their world class athletes hold.”

None of Phelps’ major results — 28 Olympic medals, 33 World Championships medals — have been impacted by the known doping of others.

But in Rio, he praised teammate Lilly King‘s criticisms of athletes competing who had previously served doping punishments. Phelps doubted he had ever competed in a clean sport.

“I think you’re going to probably see a lot of people speaking out more,” Phelps said in Rio, according to The Associated Press. “I think [King] is right, I think something needs to be done. It’s kind of sad today in sports in general, not just in swimming, there are people who are testing positive who are allowed back in the sport and multiple times. It kind of breaks what sport is meant to be and that’s what pisses me off.”

Nelson originally took silver in the 2004 Olympic shot put. Nine years later, he was upgraded to gold after Ukraine’s Yuriy Bilonog was stripped for doping. He received his gold medal at an Atlanta airport food court, reportedly at a table in front of a Chinese restaurant.

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VIDEO: Phelps plays raucous 16th hole at TPC Scottsdale

Police: 81 people accuse ex-USA Gymnastics doctor of sexual assault

In a July 15, 2008 photo, Dr. Larry Nassar works on the computer after seeing a patient in Michigan. Multiple gymnasts, including a member of the 2000 U.S. women's Olympic team, said they were sexually abused by Nassar, a former longtime doctor for USA Gymnastics, court documents and interviews show. (Becky Shink/Lansing State Journal via AP)
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LANSING, Mich. (AP) — A Michigan sports doctor who treated elite female U.S. gymnasts was charged Wednesday with sexually assaulting nine girls, including some too reluctant to speak up about the alleged abuse years ago because he was considered a “god.”

In the last six months, 81 people have claimed to be victims of sexual assault by ex-USA Gymnastics doctor Larry Nassar, according to the Michigan State University Police Department.

Roughly two dozen charges were filed Wednesday against Nassar, the first criminal cases related to his work at Michigan State University where he was the preferred doctor for gymnasts in the region who had back or hip injuries.

He’s also being sued by dozens of women and girls, including 2000 Olympian Jamie Dantzscher, who described the assaults on “60 Minutes” Sunday.

“This guy is disgusting. This guy is despicable,” Michigan Attorney General Bill Schuette told reporters. “He is a monster.”

Nassar, 53, was a doctor for Indianapolis-based USA Gymnastics, until summer 2015, accompanying the women’s team at international competitions, including the Olympics. Michigan State fired him last September after he violated restrictions that were put in place in 2014 following a complaint.

Nassar’s attorneys declined to comment Wednesday. He has denied abuse, and, in an email last fall to his Michigan State bosses, said, “I will overcome this.”

The charges were filed in two cases: one in Ingham County, the home of Michigan State, and the other nearby in Eaton County, where Nassar saw injured girls at Gedderts’ Twistars Club, a gymnastics club.

He’s accused of sticking his fingers in their vaginas, without gloves, during treatments for various injuries. Parents were asked to leave the room or Nassar used a sheet or stood in a position to block any view, police said. Two girls were under age 13, and seven were 13 to 16.

“Dr. Nassar used his status and authority to engage in horrid sexual assaults under the guise of medical procedures,” Schuette said.

A girl identified as Victim B, now 21, said she was sexually assaulted by Nassar “`more times than she could count,”‘ Det. Sgt. Andrea Munford wrote in an affidavit.

“Victim B stated that she and all the gymnasts trusted Nassar and that he was like a god to the gymnasts. … Because it was happening to all of them, they thought it was normal,” Munford said.

Munford said Nassar sometimes gave gifts to girls to keep their confidence, including leotards and pins from the Olympics. One victim quoted Nassar as saying, “We don’t tell parents about this because they wouldn’t understand,” a reference to vaginal penetration.

Schuette said more charges are coming. Michigan State University Police Chief James Dunlap said he has more than a dozen people working on the Nassar investigation.

Nassar suddenly came under intense scrutiny last summer when former gymnasts accused him of abuse, following an August report in the Indianapolis Star about how USA Gymnastics handled sexual abuse complaints against coaches and others.

Lawyers suing Michigan State on behalf of victims have accused the university of failing to do more to prevent Nassar’s alleged acts. In court filings, gymnastics coach Kathie Klages is accused of downplaying complaints about him in the late 1990s. She suddenly quit last week, a day after she was suspended for defending him in front of her team.

Michigan State is conducting an internal investigation of Nassar’s work.

“I am deeply troubled by the emerging details and recognize the courage it takes to come forward with information about personally traumatic events,” President Lou Anna Simon said Wednesday.

Besides the new criminal cases, Nassar faces charges in two cases that were filed in 2016 and are unrelated to his work as a doctor. He’s accused of possessing child pornography and molesting the daughter of family friends. He remains in jail without bond.

Dantzscher spoke to “60 Minutes” about her experiences with Nassar.

“He would put his fingers inside of me, move my leg around,” she “He would tell me I was going to feel a pop and that that would put my hips back and help my back pain.”