Elana Meyers

U.S. sweeps women’s bobsled in Park City (video)

3 Comments

U.S. Bobsled has been stellar to start the season, but it’s never been stronger than Saturday.

The U.S. swept the medals in Park City, Utah.

Elana Meyers and Aja Evans won in a two-run time of 1 minute, 38.61 seconds, followed by Jamie Greubel and Lolo Jones and Jazmine Fenlator and Lauryn Williams, who tied for silver in 1:39.24.

It’s the first time since Feb. 17, 2001, that the U.S. swept a women’s bobsled World Cup podium, according to Infostrada. That was also in Park City, one year before the Olympic debut of women’s bobsled.

“The greatest feeling today isn’t necessarily the gold medal,” Meyers said in the awards area. “It’s the fact that the three of us [teams] are up here together.”

The U.S. Bobsled Federation mixed up the second and third sled pairings from Friday’s race, where the U.S. placed first, second and fourth.

The track and field Olympians Jones and Williams replaced Katie Eberling and Emily Azevedo, respectively.

Evans and Eberling are considered favorites to make the U.S. Olympic Team. Jones and the 2010 Olympian Azevedo are thought to be vying for the third and final push athlete spot.

“It feels great to be on the podium,” said Jones, who won her first World Cup medal of the season. “With bobsled you never know when you are going to be on the podium and how long it will be before you are back on again. It makes you cherish the moments when you are doing well. Our drivers are doing outstanding this year.”

The bobsled rookie Williams won a bronze medal in her World Cup debut Saturday.

“It has been really fun to learn this whole process,” said Williams, the 2004 Olympic 100m silver medalist. “I got on the line and said, ‘I don’t want to disappoint Jazmine.’ I’m a rookie and I have to do this.”

The U.S. Olympic Team will be named in mid-January. Push athletes are chosen via discretionary selections, though World Cup results play a role in the decision-making process.

Meyers took the solo World Cup overall lead with the win, moving ahead of Canadian Olympic and world champion Kaillie Humphries. Humphries finished seventh, her worst result in nearly two years.

The U.S. has now won five of six men’s and women’s bobsled races this season. The Park City World Cup wraps up with a four-man bobsled later Saturday.

The women’s bobsled World Cup continues in Lake Placid, N.Y., next week. The sled pairings are expected to be announced midweek.

“All in all, I feel pretty good going into the rest of the season because we have a lot of room for improvement,” Evans said.

Park City Women’s Bobsled
1. Elana Meyers/Aja Evans (USA)
2. Jamie Greubel/Lolo Jones (USA) 1:39.24
2. Jazmine Fenlator/Lauryn Williams (USA) 1:39.24

Oldest man to carry Olympic torch

Team USA keeper Rooney had ‘ice in her veins’ for shootout

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) — Maddie Rooney couldn’t stop smiling. She was on top of her game, and it didn’t seem to matter that it was a shootout against the powerhouse Canadians.

The first shootout in an Olympic women’s final.

With a gold medal on the line.

Her coach, Robb Stauber, made sure not to say a word to the 20-year-old goaltender.

“I know she has ice in her veins,” Stauber said.

It sure looked like it. Rooney made 29 saves through overtime, then turned away shots from four Canadians in the six-round shootout, smiling along the way at her jubilant teammates on the bench. The last save came against four-time Olympian Meghan Agosta to clinch a 3-2 victory that ended the Americans’ 20-year gold medal drought .

The goalie who took the year off from college at Minnesota-Duluth had outdueled three-time Olympian Shannon Szabados, who was among those who prefer overtime over a shootout to settle such an important game.

“It’s more individual and less of a team thing,” Szabados said. “It’s a little harder to swallow, but that’s the way it goes.”

The United States had to replace not one, two but all three of their goalies after losing gold in 2014 at Sochi. Rooney, who played her senior year of high school in Andover, Minnesota, on the boys’ varsity team, was the goalie in net for each of the three U.S. victories over Canada in pre-Olympic play. She bounced back from a 2-1 loss last week to Canada and then some on Thursday.

Rooney said she’s been told it’s important to stay calm under pressure. She is sure she’s been nervous at times.

“But pressure is power,” said the goalie whose job title on Wikipedia entry was briefly changed to U.S. “Secretary of Defense.”

Her teammates said they had complete confidence in Rooney, who has only been with the national team since the 2017 world championships. Gigi Marvin, the oldest on the roster at 30, has been rooming with Rooney. She called Rooney unbelievable in net, so strong that they had complete trust in her.

“She’s a gem, talk about poise,” Marvin said. “We all knew she had it. She has been around all year and she just owns it.”

Stauber, a former goalie, knows exactly what a goaltender that never gets rattled means for a team. He didn’t worry about Rooney even after Haley Irwin and captain Marie-Philip Poulin scored in the second period to give Canada a 2-1 lead.

“Then she bounces back tall, after a goal or two,” Stauber said. “It sends a lot of confidence. It really is a classic example of a great goaltender.”

Monique Lamoureux-Morando scored on a breakaway late in the third period to force overtime. Rooney stopped all seven shots in the 20-minute overtime, which ended with a Canadian power play. In the shootout, Agosta beat her stick-side and Melodie Daoust scored, too.

That was it. Rooney stopped Natalie Spooner, Poulin and lastly Brianne Jenner and Agosta taking a second turn as Canada’s final shooters.

“Then it all came down to Maddie Rooney, and she had a gold medal-winning performance,” U.S. forward Hilary Knight said.

Amanda Kessel gets gold-medal encouragement from brother Phil

Getty Images
Leave a comment

GANGNEUNG, South Korea (AP) _ The night before she played for the Olympic women’s hockey gold medal, Amanda Kessel looked at her phone and saw text messages from her brother, Phil, offering encouragement.

“Just, ‘Proud of you no, matter what,’ and he believes in me,” Kessel said.

NBCOlympics.com: Gold at last: U.S. women beat rival Canada in epic shootout

Kessel hadn’t yet checked her phone in the minutes after she and the United States beat Canada 3-2 in a shootout for the gold medal in an instant classic between the sport’s two powerhouses.

Phil tweeted he was proud of his sister and all of Team USA.

Click here to read the full story