Shani Davis

Shani Davis, Heather Richardson win bronze at Berlin World Cup

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U.S. speed skaters bagged two more medals on the penultimate day of the final World Cup before the Sochi Olympics on Saturday.

Shani Davis and Heather Richardson won bronze in the 1000m and 500m, respectively.

The Berlin World Cup concludes with a men’s 500m and 5000m and a women’s 1000m and team pursuit Sunday. It’s the final opportunity for skaters to qualify Olympic quota spots for their countries.

The four-time Olympic medalist Davis saw his three-race 1000m winning streak snapped by South Korean Mo Tae-Bum. Mo, the Olympic and world 500m champion, clocked 1 minute, 9.50 seconds. The Netherlands’ Michael Mulder was second in 1:09.52, then Davis in 1:09.59.

American Joey Mantia, who won his first World Cup race in the 1500m on Friday, followed with his best-ever 1000m result, sixth.

Davis, the two-time Olympic champion in the 1000m, had won the first three World Cup races in the distance this season. The U.S. has qualified the maximum allotment of 1000m skaters for Sochi, four, which will be determined at the U.S. Olympic Trials in three weeks.

The U.S. also qualified the maximum four in the women’s 500m. For the first time this season, South Korean Olympic champion Lee Sang-Hwa did not win. She wasn’t entered simply for rest, according to a Dutch report.

In her absence, Russian Olga Fatkulina prevailed in 37.92, which was .04 better than China’s Wang Beixing. Richardson, the reigning world sprint champion, was third in 38 seconds.

The Olympic medal picture is fairly clear after eight races this season. Lee is an overwhelming favorite. Fatkulina, Wang and Richardson are all in the medal mix, too, along with German veteran Jenny Wolf.

The U.S. looks like it will qualify three spots in the women’s 1500m following the Netherlands’ Ireen Wuest‘s victory Saturday. The three-time reigning world allround champion clocked 1:55.33, beating Poland’s Katarzyna Bachleda-Curus by a comfortable .6. Dutchwoman Lotte van Beek was third, and American Brittany Bowe was sixth.

Wuest passed Bowe as the World Cup leader in the distance after four races and looks like the Sochi gold-medal favorite.

Davis and Mantia joined Jonathan Kuck in the team pursuit and took ninth behind the winning Netherlands. The Dutch have won all three team pursuits this season. The U.S. was second in the first two team events.

Berlin World Cup

Women’s 500m — Race 2
1. Olga Fatkulina (RUS) 37.92
2. Wang Beixing (CHN) 37.96
3. Heather Richardson (USA) 38.00
16. Elli Ochowicz (USA) 38.99
19. Lauren Cholewinski (USA) 39.21

Men’s 1000m
1. Mo Tae-Bum (KOR) 1:09.50
2. Michel Mulder (NED) 1:09.52
3. Shani Davis (USA) 1:09.59
6. Joey Mantia (USA) 1:09.98
12. Jonathan Garcia (USA) 1:10.19
17. Mitchell Whitmore (USA) 1:10.44
19. Trevor Marsicano (USA) 1:10.53

Women’s 1500m
1. Ireen Wuest (NED) 1:55.33
2. Katarzyna  Bachleda-Curus (POL) 1:55.93
3. Lotte van Beek (NED) 1:56.28
6. Brittany Bowe (USA) 1:57.03
18. Jilleanne Rookard (USA) 1:59.90

Men’s Team Pursuit
1. Netherlands 3:41.46
2. South Korea 3:41.92
3. Poland 3;43.81
9. USA 3:47.67

Eddie ‘The Eagle’ Edwards wants to ski jump at age 50

José Calderón retires from Spain national basketball team

Pau Gasol, Jose Calderon
AP
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Los Angeles Lakers point guard José Calderón retired from Spain’s national team after playing in his fourth Olympics in Rio.

Calderón, 34, earned silver medals in 2008 and 2012 and bronze in 2016 for Spain, which lost to the U.S. in the medal rounds at each of the last three Olympics.

Calderón is one of five Spaniards to play in the last four Olympic tournaments, along with Pau GasolJuan Carlos NavarroRudy Fernandez and Felipe Reyes.

Calderón came off the bench in Rio and played 25 minutes total in five of the team’s eight games. He’s entering his 12th season in the NBA.

Gasol, who will be 40 years old come Tokyo 2020, has not determined when he will end his international career.

VIDEO: Top basketball moments from Rio Olympics

Helen Maroulis gives Baltimore Ravens pre-game locker-room speech (video)

Helen Maroulis
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Helen Maroulis nervously stood to the side of Baltimore Ravens coach John Harbaugh as he introduced the Olympic gold medalist to his players, in full pads and ready to take the field, in their locker room Saturday.

“When you beat a legend, you become a legend,” Harbaugh told the team and Maroulis. “You’re a legend, so our guys want to hear about it.”

Maroulis, who beat three-time Olympic champion Saori Yoshida to become the first U.S. Olympic women’s wrestling champion, then stepped up. Wearing a Ravens jersey — “No. 16 Maroulis” — she addressed the team.

“I was incredibly nervous,” Maroulis said later. “I just speak from the heart.”

Her full speech before the Ravens-Lions preseason game Saturday:

“A lot of people asked if I knew I was going to win before the finals. And, no, I don’t ever know if I’m going to win before a match. And I’ve always said, I’m not called to be a Magic 8-Ball. I’m called to be a wrestler. So my job isn’t to predict the future. My job is to step out there and give everything that I have. Just through studying opponents and studying people’s mindsets and trying to figure out what was going to work for me, I just realized that you have to give everything you have, and you have to sacrifice everything that needs to be sacrificed, but you can’t take anything with you into a match that’s going to guarantee you a win. Like all the hard work, everything, that doesn’t promise you a win. You still have to step out there as if you’re wrestling for your life, or you’re fighting for your life. Did I know I was going to beat her? No. But I always say, Christ is in me. I am enough. I didn’t need to be perfect that day. I didn’t need to be the fastest. I just needed to be enough. And on that day I was enough to win.”

VIDEO: Maroulis lifts Teddy Roosevelt at Nationals game