Ted Ligety

Ted Ligety fifth in Beaver Creek super-G; Swiss wins (video)

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If Ted Ligety is going to be a multiple-medal threat in Sochi, he must produce strong results outside the giant slalom.

He took a step in Beaver Creek, Colo., on Saturday, with his third top-five super-G finish over the last four World Cup seasons.

Ligety navigated the Birds of Prey course in 1 minute, 22.21 seconds, which was good for fifth place, .48 behind Swiss winner Patrick Kueng.

“My super-G has a big range,” Ligety said, according to USA Today. “When it’s steep, I’m one of the fastest guys. If it’s flat and easy, I’m one of the middle-of-the-pack guys. So it depends where my skill set falls in there. So when it’s steep, like it is here for the most part, I have a good chance of making up time. When it’s more moderate, guys like Aksel [Lund Svindal] have a chance to beat me every time.”

Kueng, 29, who finished fifth in the previous two World Cup races, won his first career World Cup race.

“I knew I was in a good shape, in training I was fast,” Kueng said on NBC. “It’s incredible.”

Austrian Otmar Striedinger, who had never finished better than 17th in a World Cup, was second, .24 behind. Hannes Reichelt of Austria and Peter Fill of Italy shared third. Norway’s Svindal, who won the downhill Friday, came in seventh to keep his overall World Cup lead.

Ligety, 29, dominated at the World Championships in February, winning the giant slalom, super-G and super combined. He became the first man in 45 years to win three gold medals at a single worlds.

But Ligety had never before won an international super-G or super combined race (he won the 2006 Olympic combined). He missed a gate in last week’s super-G in Lake Louise, Alberta.

Ligety will be the favorite when the Beaver Creek World Cup stop concludes with a giant slalom at 11:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. ET on Sunday. NBCSN will have coverage at 3 p.m. ET.

Ligety is the reigning World Cup and world champion in the giant slalom. He won the season-opening giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, on Oct. 27.

“My slalom is like fine china,” he said, according to USA Today. “It’s really nice and looks pretty sometimes and it can be fast, but if you drop it, it breaks easily. Whereas maybe my giant slalom is like an iron skillet, where you can kick it around and do anything with it and it holds up. That’s been a little bit frustrating for me, but that’s how it kind of goes sometimes in ski racing.”

On Saturday, Olympic super-G silver medalist Bode Miller placed 14th, one spot lower than his season-best downhill finish Friday. Miller, 36 and a four-time Olympian, missed all of last season following knee surgery.

Miller said he skied “pretty close” to the peak of his ability, according to the Denver Post.

“There’s three really blind turns there that are pretty nasty at high speed at the top, and I hit all three of them within a foot of where I wanted to be, at full speed,” Miller told the newspaper. “For me, that’s really encouraging.”

Beaver Creek super-G
1. Patrick Kueng (SUI) 1:21.73
2. Otmar Striedinger (AUT) 1:21.97
3. Hannes Reichelt (AUT) 1:22.11
3. Peter Fill (ITA) 1:22.11
5. Ted Ligety (USA) 1:22.21
6. Thomas Mermillod Blondin (FRA) 1:22.27
7. Aksel Lund Svindal (NOR) 1:22.34
8. Werner Heel (ITA) 1:22.41
9. Kjetil Jansrud (NOR) 1:22.64
10. Matthias Mayer (AUT) 1:22.66
14. Bode Miller (USA) 1:22.98
20. Andrew Weibrecht (USA) 1:23.29
37. Steven Nyman (USA) 1:24.02
47. Marco Sullivan (USA) 1:25.09
DNF. Nick Daniels (USA)
DNF. Erik Fisher (USA)
DNF. Travis Ganong (USA)
DNF. Jared Goldberg (USA)
DNF. Brennan Rubie (USA)

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Kerri Walsh Jennings eyes 2020 Olympics

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 17:  Kerri Walsh Jennings of the United States celebrates a point during the Beach Volleyball Women's Bronze medal match against Larissa Franca Maestrini and Talita Rocha of Brazil on day 12 of the Rio 2016 Olympic Games at the Beach Volleyball Arena on August 17, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Ezra Shaw/Getty Images)
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If Kerri Walsh Jennings had to decide now, she’s in for Tokyo 2020.

In recent weeks, Walsh Jennings has warmed more and more to trying for a sixth Olympics at age 41, after taking bronze with April Ross in Rio. In 2020, the three-time Olympic champion will be older than any previous Olympic beach or indoor volleyball player, according to Olympic historians.

In December, Walsh Jennings told an NCAA women’s indoor volleyball championship crowd that her kids’ first words to her after she came home from Rio were, “You didn’t win gold,” according to Flovolleyball. Her response? “Tokyo 2020, kids.”

On Jan. 10, a tweet from Walsh Jennings’ account tagged “TokyoGold2020” and “AllIn.” Her Twitter bio now includes, “aspiring to be MY best #Tokyo2020.”

Then in an interview with Seth Davis published Wednesday, she reaffirmed it.

“You’re asking me right this moment. I’m in to go win a gold medal [in 2020],” she said. “That’s like, period, end of statement with regard to me. I’m a family of five, and this journey requires total commitment from not just myself but my kids and my husband and so many other people. So I need to get on the same page with my hubby because it’s a lonely life when I’m traveling the world. He’s an athlete as well [beach volleyball player Casey Jennings], but he’s retired from the international scene, so he’s home. If I go four more years, which I want to, I need to consider lots of things, but, yes, I’m in.”

Walsh Jennings and Ross are set to make their 2017 season debut in Fort Lauderdale next month. Previously, Ross was planning to take 2017 off to have a child.

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President Obama honors Olympians in final press conference (video)

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Barack Obama has honored Olympians in his final days as president, including specifically naming gold medalists Simone Biles and Michael Phelps on Wednesday.

At his final presidential press conference, Obama brought up the Olympics when asked if he thought there would be another black president.

His answer at the 41:45 mark in the above video:

“I think I’ve used this analogy before. We killed it in the Olympics in Brazil. And Michelle and I, we always have our — the Olympic team here. And it’s a lot of fun, first of all, just because, you know, anytime you’re meeting somebody who’s the best at anything, it’s impressive.

And these mostly very young people are all just so healthy looking, and they just beam and exude fitness and health. And so we have a great time talking to them. But they are of all shapes, sizes, colors. You know, the genetic diversity that is on display is remarkable.

And if you look at Simone Biles, and then you look at a Michael Phelps, they’re completely different. And it’s precisely because of those differences that we’ve got people here who can excel at any sport.

And by the way, more than half of our medals [in Rio] came from women. And the reason is is because we had the foresight several decades ago with something called Title IX to make sure that women got opportunities in sports, which is why our women compete better, because they have more opportunities than folks in other countries.

I use that as a metaphor, and if in fact we continue to keep opportunity open to everybody, then yeah, we’re going to have a woman president. We’re going to have a Latino president. We’ll have a Jewish president, a Hindu president. Who knows who we’re going to have.

I suspect we’ll have a whole bunch of mixed up presidents at some point that nobody really knows what to call ’em.”

MORE: Obama appoints four Olympic medalists to positions