Ted Ligety

Ted Ligety fifth in Beaver Creek super-G; Swiss wins (video)

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If Ted Ligety is going to be a multiple-medal threat in Sochi, he must produce strong results outside the giant slalom.

He took a step in Beaver Creek, Colo., on Saturday, with his third top-five super-G finish over the last four World Cup seasons.

Ligety navigated the Birds of Prey course in 1 minute, 22.21 seconds, which was good for fifth place, .48 behind Swiss winner Patrick Kueng.

“My super-G has a big range,” Ligety said, according to USA Today. “When it’s steep, I’m one of the fastest guys. If it’s flat and easy, I’m one of the middle-of-the-pack guys. So it depends where my skill set falls in there. So when it’s steep, like it is here for the most part, I have a good chance of making up time. When it’s more moderate, guys like Aksel [Lund Svindal] have a chance to beat me every time.”

Kueng, 29, who finished fifth in the previous two World Cup races, won his first career World Cup race.

“I knew I was in a good shape, in training I was fast,” Kueng said on NBC. “It’s incredible.”

Austrian Otmar Striedinger, who had never finished better than 17th in a World Cup, was second, .24 behind. Hannes Reichelt of Austria and Peter Fill of Italy shared third. Norway’s Svindal, who won the downhill Friday, came in seventh to keep his overall World Cup lead.

Ligety, 29, dominated at the World Championships in February, winning the giant slalom, super-G and super combined. He became the first man in 45 years to win three gold medals at a single worlds.

But Ligety had never before won an international super-G or super combined race (he won the 2006 Olympic combined). He missed a gate in last week’s super-G in Lake Louise, Alberta.

Ligety will be the favorite when the Beaver Creek World Cup stop concludes with a giant slalom at 11:45 a.m. and 2:45 p.m. ET on Sunday. NBCSN will have coverage at 3 p.m. ET.

Ligety is the reigning World Cup and world champion in the giant slalom. He won the season-opening giant slalom in Soelden, Austria, on Oct. 27.

“My slalom is like fine china,” he said, according to USA Today. “It’s really nice and looks pretty sometimes and it can be fast, but if you drop it, it breaks easily. Whereas maybe my giant slalom is like an iron skillet, where you can kick it around and do anything with it and it holds up. That’s been a little bit frustrating for me, but that’s how it kind of goes sometimes in ski racing.”

On Saturday, Olympic super-G silver medalist Bode Miller placed 14th, one spot lower than his season-best downhill finish Friday. Miller, 36 and a four-time Olympian, missed all of last season following knee surgery.

Miller said he skied “pretty close” to the peak of his ability, according to the Denver Post.

“There’s three really blind turns there that are pretty nasty at high speed at the top, and I hit all three of them within a foot of where I wanted to be, at full speed,” Miller told the newspaper. “For me, that’s really encouraging.”

Beaver Creek super-G
1. Patrick Kueng (SUI) 1:21.73
2. Otmar Striedinger (AUT) 1:21.97
3. Hannes Reichelt (AUT) 1:22.11
3. Peter Fill (ITA) 1:22.11
5. Ted Ligety (USA) 1:22.21
6. Thomas Mermillod Blondin (FRA) 1:22.27
7. Aksel Lund Svindal (NOR) 1:22.34
8. Werner Heel (ITA) 1:22.41
9. Kjetil Jansrud (NOR) 1:22.64
10. Matthias Mayer (AUT) 1:22.66
14. Bode Miller (USA) 1:22.98
20. Andrew Weibrecht (USA) 1:23.29
37. Steven Nyman (USA) 1:24.02
47. Marco Sullivan (USA) 1:25.09
DNF. Nick Daniels (USA)
DNF. Erik Fisher (USA)
DNF. Travis Ganong (USA)
DNF. Jared Goldberg (USA)
DNF. Brennan Rubie (USA)

Russian man, 101, is oldest Olympic relay torchbearer

PyeongChang late night roundup

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Last night belonged to the U.S. women’s hockey team. In the unlikely event that you slept through the game, the USA defeated Canada in a mesmerizing 3-2 shootout to win the USA’s first Olympic gold medal in women’s hockey since 1998.

It was Jocelyne Lamoureux-Davidson who gave the United States the go-ahead goal in the sixth shootout attempt, and it was Rooney’s block that sealed the victory for the Americans.

That wasn’t the only key event tonight, though. Mikaela Shiffrin got back on the podium in the women’s combined, while Lindsey Vonn posted a DNF in the second run.

Continue reading below to catch up on all the action from PyeongChang.


Hockey: USA win gold, def. CAN 3-2 (SO)

This victory was decades in the making. After narrowly losing to Canada in Olympic finals before, the Americans were finally able to win the gold medal.

The game proved to be a hotly-contested affair and featured the highest quality, and the grittiest, hockey played throughout the course of the tournament. The USA were up 1-0 at the first intermission, before Canada put up two goals of their own in the second. A goal by Monique Lamoureux-Morando brought the U.S. level before they took out the four-time defending gold medalists in the shootout.

Click here for the full recap 

Alpine Skiing: Shiffrin wins silver, Vonn misses out  

Mikaela Shiffrin and Lindsey Vonn had mixed results in the women’s combined. Vonn, two days after claiming bronze in the downhill, posted the best time in the downhill section tonight, while Shiffrin had some work to do after finishing sixth.

Shiffrin, who favors the slalom, sped down the bottom portion of the course to propel herself to a guaranteed medal position. Vonn, who skied the slalom last, saw her quest for gold abruptly end after she hooked one of the gates on the course, resulting in a DNF.

The two favorites of the men’s slalom, Marcel Hirscher and Henrik Kristofferson, both failed to finish their races, which left open a huge opportunity for the field. The man who stepped up was Sweden’s Andre Myhrer, who finished in 1:38.99.

Read the full women’s combined recap here 

Short Track: South Korea stunned in final short track day 

It was a disastrous day for South Korea. Their strategy for this event was to sit back for the majority of the race, and then strike in the last three laps.

Choi Minjeong, a huge favorite to win gold, found herself in fifth place heading into the final two laps and attempted to maneuver her way into the gold medal position. On the final turn, though, Choi tried to move inside the lane but ended up colliding with her compatriot Suk Shim-Hee, leaving the South Korean crowd silent.

Suzanne Schulting of the Netherlands won the gold.

In the men’s relay 5000m, the Koreans were expected to win gold as well. There was a lot of contact in the race, but it was an untimely fall from a South Korean skater that ended their dreams – again, leaving the home crowd silent.

Hungary, China, and Canada took home the medals.

Full recap available here 

Biathlon: Belarus wins relay gold on windy evening

A very windy evening made shooting increasingly difficult for the athletes tonight. It reared its ugly head with Germany and Norway, two teams that were supposed to be the front runners for the gold medal. Laura Dahlmeier, who’s been excellent this whole fortnight, didn’t even have a chance to properly anchor Germany because they were already a minute behind before they reached her.

It ended up being Belarus with the gold, powered by six-time Olympic gold medalist Darya Domracheva in the final leg. Sweden and France finished second and third, respectively.

Nordic Combined: Germany powers to gold 

A strong cross-country performance gave Germany another medal in the nordic combined. Austria led entering the event, having finished first in the large hill portion, but Eric Frenzel and company crushed the competition in the 20km relay. The Germans won by a margin of 52 seconds. Norway and Austria came in second and third, respectively.

Full nordic combined recap available here

Miracle re-dub: USA win gold in Olympic hockey

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Feb. 22 has proven to be a day bringing good cheer to American hockey.

Exactly 38 years ago to this day, Herb Brooks guided the United States men’s hockey team to an improbable Olympic gold medal, putting an end to the Soviet Union’s four straight hockey golds.

History does have a way of repeating itself.

Tonight, the U.S. women’s team’s Olympic anguish turned to triumph after they beat arch-rivals Canada 3-2 in a shootout thriller. In doing so, the American women snapped Canada’s streak of four consecutive Olympic gold medals.

It was only four years ago when the Americans suffered a heartbreaking defeat to Canada in Sochi, losing in overtime. They wouldn’t allow themselves to forget it.

It was that memory that pushed Team USA in this tournament, who were destined to take on their bitter northern rivals. Like Herb Brooks’ team, the U.S. women’s team showed tremendous character to fight back in the third period when they were down 1-2, and again when they were down in the shootout.

A beautifully choreographed penalty shot from Jocelyne Lamoreux-Davidson, backed up by 20-year old Maddie Rooney’s game winning save, that sealed Team USA’s historic run.

Four years ago was Canada’s time. Tonight, it’s America’s time.