Seth Wescott

Seth Wescott ‘getting close’ in return from knee injury (video)

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Seth Wescott knows a thing or two about coming back to win Olympic gold.

In 2006, the man from Maine passed Slovakian Radoslav Zidek in the second half of the first Olympic snowboardcross final and edged him out for victory by less than the length of a snowboard.

In 2010, Wescott moved from last place early on to beat Canadian Mike Robertson for gold, also by a matter of inches.

His comeback for the Sochi Olympic snowboardcross is already in motion, two months before the Games.

Wescott, 37, underwent “a complete reconstruction” of his left ACL in April after falling into an Alaska crevasse while shooting part of a film for ski and snowboard director Warren Miller. He tore the ACL and broke his tibia.

“I basically ended up hitting a wall at 40 mph, and when I got to the bottom I knew right away that something was very wrong,” Wescott told in August. “The ACL was just gone. Not exactly the way I wanted to start my summer training.”

Wescott, who could become the first American man to win the same Winter Olympic event three straight times, said his knee is “getting close” to competition level on TODAY on Thursday morning.

He’s been testing the knee in Soelden, Austria, earlier this month and, more recently, at home at Sugarloaf Mountain in Carrabassett Valley.

Wescott said he will travel with the U.S. team to Lake Louise, Alberta, for a World Cup stop Dec. 21 but doesn’t think he’ll compete there.

“Buying myself three more weeks through the Christmas holidays and just the amount of training that I’ll be able to get in that time, I’ll have some real progress,” Wescott said on TODAY.

Wescott is one of three Olympians trying to become the first American man to win the same Winter Olympic event three straight times (Bonnie Blair is the only U.S. woman to do it). Fellow snowboarder Shaun White (halfpipe) and speed skater Shani Davis (1000m) also won in 2006 and 2010.

Wescott, if they all make the Olympic team, would be the last of the three to make the attempt. Men’s snowboardcross in Sochi is Feb. 17, five days after Davis’ 1000m and six days after White’s halfpipe.

He might even go after a fourth gold in Pyeongchang, South Korea, in 2018. Wescott’s been inspired by surfing legend Kelly Slater, who at 41 is trying to win his 12th world title this week.

“I never would have thought, even post-Torino, that I’d be going right now,” said Wescott, who will be 41 in 2018. “To be honest, I’m getting better at it every year. … The time point where I decide to walk away will be when I feel that there’s stagnation.”

Olympic snowboardcross contender breaks collarbone in training

BuzzFeed scares Olympians with a live turkey

Buzzfeed Turkey
BuzzFeed Video / Via
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In honor of Thanksgiving, our friends at BuzzFeed decided to surprise several Olympians with a live turkey.

Watch your favorite Olympians practice their turkey calls, and even take selfies with the bird:

Athletes featured in the video:

Tori Bowie (Track & Field)

Matt Centrowitz (Track & Field)

Dawn Harper-Nelson (Track & Field)

Jenny Simpson (Track & Field)

Katelin Snyder (Rowing)

MORE: NBC Olympics Thanksgiving Rio promo

Bobsled Olympic medalist Steve Langton retires

SOCHI, RUSSIA - FEBRUARY 03:  (BROADCAST-OUT)  Steve Langton of the United States Bobsled team poses for a portrait ahead of the Sochi 2014 Winter Olympics on February 3, 2014 in Sochi, Russia.  (Photo by Scott Halleran/Getty Images)
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Steve Langton, who was described by driver Steven Holcomb as the “best push athlete in the world,” announced his retirement today.

A collegiate sprinter and jumper at Northeastern University, Langton decided to try bobsledding after watching the 2006 Winter Olympics. He filled out an online athlete resume, and, by the 2010 Games, he was an Olympian.

At the Sochi 2014 Games, Langton teamed with Holcomb to win a bronze medal in the two-man race. It was the first Olympic medal in the event by American sled since 1952. He claimed another bronze medal as a member of Holcomb’s four-man “Night Train.”

“In Sochi I competed on the world’s biggest stage, I won two medals for my country and I did so along not only the best teammates but best friends anyone could ever ask for,” Langton told USA Bobsled.

Langton, who has a 62-inch standing box jump and can squat more than 500 pounds, was described by Men’s Health as “the most powerful winter Olympian” in the lead-up to 2014 Games.

“[Langton’s] work ethic and discipline rubbed off on the other athletes and made everyone better,” said USA Bobsled & Skeleton Chief Executive Officer Darrin Steele. “I have no doubt that he’ll find success in the next chapter of his life as well.”

Langton appeared on “The Amazing Race” in 2015 with his girlfriend, Aly Dudek, an Olympic short track speedskater.

None of the push athletes on the current U.S. roster have Olympic experience. Holcomb will compete in the World Cup opener this Saturday with Sam McGuffie, a former University of Michigan football player. The race will be McGuffie’s World Cup debut.