Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong bought race win, Italian cyclist says

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An Italian cyclist said Lance Armstrong gave him $100,000 as part of an agreement to let Armstrong win a race 20 years ago.

“It was a young American colleague,” said Roberto Gaggioli, according to Agence France-Presse translating comments in Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera. “He offered me a panettone [a traditional Italian Christmas cake] as a present and wished me a merry Christmas. In the box there were $100,000 in small bills. That colleague was Lance Armstrong.”

The payment was for the 1993 Thrift Drug Triple Crown. Armstrong, then a 21-year-old rookie, won all three races over 21 days and a $1 million prize, at the time the richest prize in the history of cycling, according to USA Today.

Gaggioli said the payment decided Armstrong would win the final leg of the triple crown, the CoreStates USPRO Cycling Championship in Philadelphia. Armstrong was riding for the Motorola Cycling Team at the time.

“Lance said that my team, Coors Light, had agreed to it,” Gaggioli said, according to the report. “I understood that it had all been decided.”

The Italian is not the first Coors Light team cyclist to say Armstrong’s triple crown win was pre-determined.

New Zealand’s Stephen Swart gave a sworn deposition in January 2006 that Armstrong and another Motorola teammate offered him $50,000 to help fix the triple crown series during the second of the three races, which lasted five days. This was according to ABC in Australia.

Swart later joined Armstrong’s Motorola team.

The Italian newspaper added that another cyclist said he was offered money to let Armstrong win.

Angelo Canzonieri and Lance agreed on a fee of 50, Angelo thought he meant dollars but Lance meant lire,” Roberto Pelliconi said. “At the Tour of Lombardy he gave us 50 million (lire).”

Armstrong won in Philadelphia by successfully attacking Canzonieri, Pelliconi and three others on a late climb.

“This is definitely the highlight of my career and probably my life,” Armstrong reportedly said after winning.

In 1993, Armstrong said he valued the honor won of being able to wear a stars-and-stripes jersey as the U.S. champion in European races over the $1 million.

“This is great for Lance Armstrong and Motorola, but it’s even bigger for the sport of cycling,” Armstrong told USA Today in 1993. “Football fans and couch potatoes will watch basket weaving if there’s a million bucks on the line.”

Armstrong says he was ‘singled out’

More of best GIFs from PyeongChang Olympics

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The 2018 Winter Games are over, but that doesn’t mean we’ll forget all the amazing heights reached by American athletes. Take a look back at a few of them here with an added twist, powered by Giphy:

18 most dominant athletes from the 2018 Olympics

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My 18 most dominant gold medalists at the Olympics, choosing at least one from each sport. 

1. Ester Ledecka, Czech Republic, Alpine Skiing/Snowboarding
Arguably the greatest athlete on the planet after taking surprise gold in Alpine skiing’s super-G and snowboarding’s parallel giant slalom (where she was the clear favorite). The 22-year-old became the third athlete to win individual Winter Olympic gold medals in different sports, the first since 1932 and the first woman. The other two were done in cross-country skiing and Nordic combined, the latter being a mixture of ski jumping and cross-country skiing. Ledecka’s feat was certainly more impressive.

2. Marit Bjørgen, Norway, Cross-Country Skiing
The most decorated athlete at the Games with five medals, including two golds. Bigger, though, is that the 37-year-old mom broke countryman Ole Einar Bjørndalen’s record for career Winter Olympic medals, finishing with 15. She also tied Bjørndalen and Bjørn Dæhlie’s record of eight Winter Olympic titles by winning the last event of the Games, the 30km, by 109 seconds, the largest Olympic cross-country margin of victory in 38 years. In her final career Olympic race.

3. Yun Sung-Bin, South Korea, Skeleton
Under host-nation pressure, the man in the Iron Man helmet had the fastest run in each of the four heats and won by 1.63 seconds, the largest margin in Olympic skeleton history.

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