Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong bought race win, Italian cyclist says

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An Italian cyclist said Lance Armstrong gave him $100,000 as part of an agreement to let Armstrong win a race 20 years ago.

“It was a young American colleague,” said Roberto Gaggioli, according to Agence France-Presse translating comments in Italian newspaper Corriere della Sera. “He offered me a panettone [a traditional Italian Christmas cake] as a present and wished me a merry Christmas. In the box there were $100,000 in small bills. That colleague was Lance Armstrong.”

The payment was for the 1993 Thrift Drug Triple Crown. Armstrong, then a 21-year-old rookie, won all three races over 21 days and a $1 million prize, at the time the richest prize in the history of cycling, according to USA Today.

Gaggioli said the payment decided Armstrong would win the final leg of the triple crown, the CoreStates USPRO Cycling Championship in Philadelphia. Armstrong was riding for the Motorola Cycling Team at the time.

“Lance said that my team, Coors Light, had agreed to it,” Gaggioli said, according to the report. “I understood that it had all been decided.”

The Italian is not the first Coors Light team cyclist to say Armstrong’s triple crown win was pre-determined.

New Zealand’s Stephen Swart gave a sworn deposition in January 2006 that Armstrong and another Motorola teammate offered him $50,000 to help fix the triple crown series during the second of the three races, which lasted five days. This was according to ABC in Australia.

Swart later joined Armstrong’s Motorola team.

The Italian newspaper added that another cyclist said he was offered money to let Armstrong win.

Angelo Canzonieri and Lance agreed on a fee of 50, Angelo thought he meant dollars but Lance meant lire,” Roberto Pelliconi said. “At the Tour of Lombardy he gave us 50 million (lire).”

Armstrong won in Philadelphia by successfully attacking Canzonieri, Pelliconi and three others on a late climb.

“This is definitely the highlight of my career and probably my life,” Armstrong reportedly said after winning.

In 1993, Armstrong said he valued the honor won of being able to wear a stars-and-stripes jersey as the U.S. champion in European races over the $1 million.

“This is great for Lance Armstrong and Motorola, but it’s even bigger for the sport of cycling,” Armstrong told USA Today in 1993. “Football fans and couch potatoes will watch basket weaving if there’s a million bucks on the line.”

Armstrong says he was ‘singled out’

Michael Phelps left with one meet before Olympic Trials

Michael Phelps
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Michael Phelps could face his lightest-ever competition run-up to an Olympic Trials after opting not to swim at a meet in Atlanta next week.

Last week, Phelps noted one other scheduled meet before the U.S. Olympic Trials (June 26-July 3). That’s in Austin, Texas, from June 3-5.

In his previous four Olympic cycles, Phelps swam at least two meets in the final two months before the Olympic Trials, according to USA Swimming statistics.

Phelps’ training plan in May and June will be impacted by the impending birth of his first child. Fiancée Nicole Johnson is 36 weeks pregnant, according to her Instagram.

Without Phelps, the Atlanta meet is expected to include five-time 2015 World champion Katie Ledecky, 12-time Olympic medalist Natalie Coughlin, Olympic 100m free champion Nathan Adrian and rising sprint freestyler Caeleb Dressel.

VIDEO: Phelps’ interview with Matt Lauer

Pyeongchang 2018 Olympic chief quits

Pyeongchang 2018
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SEOUL, South Korea (AP) — A former South Korean government minister was nominated to take over the organizing committee of the 2018 Winter Olympics on Tuesday, just hours after Cho Yang-ho quit amid escalating financial troubles at the business group his family controls.

Lee Hee-beom, a former minister of industry and energy, needs to be ratified by a vote of senior committee officials to officially become president of the organizing committee for the Pyeongchang Games.

Cho’s sudden resignation marked the second change in less than two years at the helm of the local organizing committee, which had struggled to get preparations back on track in the face of venue construction delays, disputes over the location of the Olympic Stadium and slow pace of domestic sponsorship.

Cho is chairman of the Hanjin Group, which controls Olympic sponsor Korean Air and a major shipping company struggling with heavy debt.

He said in a statement he couldn’t continue with the Olympic job because he needs to focus on stabilizing Hanjin Shipping, South Korea’s largest container carrier, which said last week that it will undergo a debt revamp program with creditors in its last-ditch efforts to stay in business.

Cho took over as president of Pyeongchang’s organizing committee in July 2014 after the sudden resignation of Kim Jin-sun, the former governor of the region that includes Pyeongchang.

“For the past two years, I have truly put forward my very best efforts to work with every member of the organizing committee to prepare a successful Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games in 2018,” Cho said in the statement. “I can proudly say that POCOG has become a strong team, and the challenges we have overcome have allowed us to achieve success at our first official test events this past February.”

Pyeongchang organizers have faced a series of challenges in recent years, including the construction delays, local conflicts over venues and criticism about their financial planning, but preparations had seemed to turn a corner after the successful hosting of test events earlier this year in Olympic venues.

Gunilla Lindberg, head of the International Olympic Committee’s coordination commission for the 2018 Winter Games, said the IOC respected Cho’s decision and appreciated his cooperation in recent years.

“Under his leadership, the organizing committee has made great progress and has delivered very successful test events,” Lindberg said. “There remain a number of important steps to be taken ahead of the Games and the IOC remains confident that through our close cooperation with the Pyeongchang 2018 organizing committee these will be successfully addressed.”

The announcement of Cho’s resignation came on the same day the Olympic flame was set to land in Brazil, where problems in preparations have sometimes overshadowed the build up to the Summer Games in Rio de Janeiro in August.

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