Hayley Wickenheiser

Canada names women’s Olympic hockey team

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As expected, the Canadian women’s Olympic hockey team will be older than the U.S. roster.

Hockey Canada announced its final three cuts and the official 21-woman team for Sochi on Monday.

It’s led by six-time Olympian Hayley Wickenheiser, largely regarded as the greatest player in women’s hockey history. Wickenheiser, 35, has won three Olympic gold medals, one silver and competed in the 2000 Sydney Olympics for Canada in softball.

She’s also the all-time leading scorer in Olympic women’s hockey history and one of two women’s players in EA Sports’ NHL 13 video game (the other is retired American Angela Ruggiero).

Canada has won the last three Olympic golds and took silver to the U.S. in the first Olympic women’s hockey tournament in 1998. The U.S. is the reigning world champion and has won two straight games over Canada this fall after Canadian coach Dan Church resigned.

Former NHL player Kevin Dineen now coaches Canada and would be the first male Olympic coach for the women’s hockey team. The U.S. is coached by Katey Stone, who would be the first women’s coach for the U.S. Olympic Team.

The average Canadian women’s Olympic hockey player age is 26 years old. The U.S.’ average age will be about 24 once it makes its final cuts and names its team on Jan. 1.

The Canadian roster includes 12 Olympians from 2010, six Olympians from 2006, three Olympians from 2002 and two Olympians from 1998.

The U.S. roster will include a maximum of 12 Olympians from 2010, one from 2006, one from 2002 and none from 1998.

Here’s the full Canadian roster:

Goalies
Shannon Szabados — 2010 Olympian (shut out U.S. in 2010 Olympic gold-medal game)
Charline Labonte — 2006, 2010 Olympian
Genevieve Lacasse

Defensemen
Meaghan Mikkelson — 2010 Olympian
Catherine Ward — 2010 Olympian
Laura Fortino
Jocelyne Larocque
Lauriane Rougeau
Tara Watchorn

Forwards
Hayley Wickenheiser — 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 Olympian
Jayna Hefford — 1998, 2002, 2006, 2010 Olympian
Caroline Ouellette — 2002, 2006, 2010 Olympian
Meghan Agosta-Marciano — 2006, 2010 Olympian
Gillian Apps — 2006, 2010 Olympian
Marie-Philip Poulin — 2010 Olympian (scored both 2010 Olympic gold-medal game goals)
Haley Irwin — 2010 Olympian
Rebecca Johnston — 2010 Olympian
Melodia Daoust
Brianne Jenner
Natalie Spooner
Jennifer Wakefield

Video: U.S., Canada brawl in exhibition

First four U.S. Olympic archers qualified; Khatuna Lorig waits

Khatuna Lorig
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The first four U.S. Olympic archers for Rio are known, while Khatuna Lorig will learn in three weeks if she makes her sixth Olympic team.

A full men’s team of 2012 Olympic team silver medalists Brady Ellison and Jake Kaminski and first-time Olympian Zach Garrett earned their spots at the U.S. Olympic Trials that ended Monday.

Mackenzie Brown clinched her first Olympic berth by winning the women’s trials Monday.

The U.S. can send two more women to Rio if it qualifies a full team at a World Cup event in Turkey in three weeks. Those two women would be Hye Youn Park and Lorig.

Lorig, 42, is best known for teaching archery to Jennifer Lawrence before “The Hunger Games.” Lorig also competed in the 1992 Olympics for the Unified Team, the 1996 and 2000 Games for Georgia and the 2008 and 2012 Olympics for the U.S.

Lorig earned team bronze at Barcelona 1992 and finished fifth and fourth individually at the 2008 and 2012 Olympics.

The U.S. Olympic team alternates are Daniel McLaughlin and La Nola Pritchard.

MORE: Full list of athletes qualified for U.S. Olympic team

Jan Hudec, Olympic bronze medalist skier, switches from Canada to Czech Republic

Jan Hudec
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Co-Olympic super-G bronze medalist Jan Hudec was granted a request by Alpine Canada to represent the Czech Republic next season after being left off Canada’s national team.

Hudec, 34, wasn’t eligible for Canada’s national team after racing once in 2015-16 due to the latest of his many knee surgeries, according to Alpine Canada.

“It is important to know that we continued to work with Jan after the team selection was announced, and let him know that we were more then willing to find accommodation that would enable him to return to the team,” Alpine Canada said in a press release. “However, at this stage of Jan’s career, he is making a decision that can best meet his desire to fulfill and lead a different way of life, that reaches beyond ski racing.”

The International Ski Federation must still grant Hudec’s request. Hudec was born in the Czech Republic.

At the Sochi Olympics, Hudec shared bronze with Bode Miller in the super-G. He is also the 2007 World Championships downhill silver medalist and a two-time winner of World Cup races.

The 2016-17 Alpine skiing World Cup season is expected to begin in Soelden, Austria, in late October.

MORE: Bode Miller says ‘good likelihood’ of comeback