Marlies Schild

Marlies Schild edges Mikaela Shiffrin, breaks record (video)

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Marlies Schild made history, and she might also have retaken the crown as world’s best slalom skier from American Mikaela Shiffrin.

Schild came back from sixth place after the first of two runs in Lienz, Austria, to win her 35th career World Cup slalom race on Sunday. That broke the Austrian’s tie with Swiss legend Vreni Schneider for the most ever.

Shiffrin took second after leading the first run. Schild was  .47 of a second faster than the field in the second run and beat Shiffrin’s two-run total by .41. Shiffrin was 10th fastest in the second run. German Maria Hoefl-Riesch was third overall.

“I am happy with a podium,” Shiffrin said, according to The Associated Press, adding “it’s a bit disappointing” to lose her first-run lead.

The women’s Alpine skiing World Cup continues with a slalom in Bormio, Italy, on Jan. 5.

Lindsey Vonn does not race slaloms. The earliest she could compete next is a Jan. 11 downhill in Altenmarkt, Austria, but her status going forward is unknown after she skied out of a downhill in Val d’Isere, France, on Dec. 21.

Schild, 32, won her second straight World Cup slalom in her comeback from tearing right knee ligaments on Dec. 20, 2012.

“It’s hard to believe but now for sure the record is mine,” Schild said, according to Reuters. “I must admit I felt relieved after [tying Schneider’s record in] Courchevel. I needed to break the jinx. It was making me nervous in the end. Everybody was talking about the record.

“I even noticed in training that there was a before and after Courchevel. I’m much more relaxed now.”

Shiffrin went on to win the World Championship and World Cup title in her absence last season.

Schild won Olympic silver in 2010, World Championships gold in 2011 and four of six World Cup titles from 2007 through 2012.

How close are Schild and Shiffrin now?

Shiffrin leads the World Cup slalom standings with 202 points after three races. Schild is in second place with 200 points.

“For me a girl like Shiffrin is a great motivation,” Schild said, according to Reuters. “I must keep up with the younger skiers and I’m aware that time is not on my side.”

Lienz Slalom
1. Marlies Schild (AUT) 1:55.63
2. Mikaela Shiffrin (USA) 1:56.04
3. Maria Hoefl-Riesch (GER) 1:56.26
4. Marie-Michele Gagnon (CAN) 1:56.64
5. Nina Loeseth (NOR) 1:56.87
6. Frida Hansdotter (SWE) 1:57.06
7. Chiara Costazza (ITA) 1:57.11
8. Christina Geiger (GER) 1:57.27
9. Wendy Holdener (SUI) 1:57.35
10. Anne-Sophie Barthet (FRA) 1:57.76
16. Resi Stiegler (USA) 1:58.70

History made at U.S. Olympic Nordic Combined Trials

Triplets set for Olympic history in Rio (video)

Luik sisters
NBC News
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Estonian sisters Leila, Liina and Lily Luik are set to become what is believed to be the first set of triplets to compete in an Olympics, according to Games historians.

The Luiks, identical triplets born Oct. 14, 1985, remain the only Estonian women to meet the Olympic qualifying time for the marathon. And since a nation can send three qualified athletes to the Olympic marathon, all three are in line to go to Rio.

The Estonia athletics federation’s qualifying cutoff is Wednesday. It doesn’t believe any other Estonians will register an Olympic qualifying time by then.

With most marathons taking place on weekends, it appears the Luiks are safe, even though none has run faster than 2:37, and the Olympic medal winners will likely be running in the low-to-mid 2:20s.

MORE: Ethiopian legend not on Olympic marathon team

Paralympic champ Markus Rehm still hopes for Olympic spot

Markus Rehm
Getty Images
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COLOGNE, Germany (AP) — Paralympic long jump champion Markus Rehm is still hoping to compete at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro despite a scientific study’s inconclusive findings on whether his carbon-fiber prosthesis gives him an unfair advantage over able-bodied athletes.

Wolfgang Potthast of the German Sport University in Cologne said Monday that it was “difficult if not impossible” to determine whether the 27-year-old Rehm gets an advantage or not.

The study conducted by the German Sport University along with the University of Colorado and the National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology in Tokyo found that athletes with a running-specific prosthesis have an impaired ability in the run up but a better technique for the long jump, leaving open the question of whether a prosthesis helps or hinders the athlete.

“The study could not identify any advantage through the prosthesis, and I think that for me is a good result,” said Rehm, who is hoping to compete both at the Olympics in Rio de Janeiro in August and at the following Paralympics.

“I want to bring the Paralympic and Olympic sport closer together. To give both sides the chance to profit from this.”

Rehm is aiming to be the second athlete with a carbon-fiber prosthesis to compete at the Olympics and Paralympics after South African runner Oscar Pistorius in 2012.

To become eligible under a new rule introduced last year by the IAAF, Rehm has to prove that his prosthesis gives him no advantage over athletes with a similar disability or non-amputee long jumpers.

“I’ve taken the first step with the study, so now I await a step in return from the world body,” said Rehm, who lost his lower right leg in a wakeboarding accident when he was 14.

Rehm won the gold medal at 2012 London Paralympics and holds the world record in his competition class at 8.40 meters. Rehm also won the German national title in 2014 over non-amputee athletes, drawing a mixed reaction.

He was then prevented from competing for the German team at the European Championships, with track and field officials saying the prosthesis could give him an unfair catapult effect.

“Since the German championship in 2014 it has been an ordeal. It’s difficult for me to hear these charges [of having an advantage]. I don’t want to have any advantage. On the other hand, you feel you have to apologize to other athletes,” Rehm said. “There were times when I asked myself if it was worth it.”

Under current rules, Rehm is not eligible for the German team.

“There is no finding that has found an advantage,” Friedhelm Julius Beucher, president of the German National Paralympic Committee, said reacting to the study. “It’s not a question of fairness but a case of discrimination.”

MORE: 100 Olympic storylines as Rio Games approach