Russia Explosion

Russia suicide bombings will not affect Sochi Olympic security

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Security at the Sochi Olympics will not be increased due to two suicide bombings the last two days in Volgograd, Russian Olympic Committee president Alexander Zhukov said Monday.

“All necessary measures are envisioned at the Olympic Games in Sochi,” Zhukov said, according to ITAR-TASS news agency. “No other security measures will be taken due to the terrorist act in Volgograd because everything is done.”

More than 30 people have been killed in explosions Sunday and Monday in Volgograd, a city of more than one million people about 400 miles northeast of Sochi.

A suicide bomber killed 14 on a bus in Volgograd on Monday. Authorities believe it was the work of the same group responsible for a bomb set off at a railway station Sunday, according to The Associated Press.

In October, another suicide bombing took place on a bus in Volgograd. In July, a Chechen rebel leader called for militant attacks on the Sochi Olympics.

Russian president Vladimir Putin ordered extra security nationwide after the attack Monday.

“I have personally written to the president of the Russian Federation, Vladimir Putin, to express our condolences to the Russian people,” said International Olympic Committee president Thomas Bach in a statement Monday. “I am certain that everything will be done to ensure the security of the athletes and all the participants of the Olympic Games.”

The U.S. government offered full support.

“We would welcome the opportunity for closer cooperation for the safety of the athletes, spectators and other participants,” National Security Council spokeswoman Caitlin Hayden said.

The Sochi Olympics will include new security measures such as a “spectator pass” in addition to normal tickets. Spectator passes “require providing passport details and contacts that will allow the authorities to screen all visitors and check their identities upon arrival,” according to the AP.

Also, special troops, drones and speed boats will keep a close eye on the area in and around Sochi during the Games, which begin Feb. 6.

One of Russia’s most celebrated athletes, two-time Olympic pole vault champion Yelena Isinbayeva, calls Volgograd home.

“It is hard for me to talk now,” Isinbayeva told ITAR-TASS, according to Agence France-Presse. “None of my family or loved ones suffered. But I feel terrible, simply terrible.”

Fiji Olympic rugby coach given 3 acres of land, special name

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 11:  Gold medalists Ro Dakuwaqa of Fiji and Fiji head coach Ben Ryan celebrate after the medal ceremony for the Men's Rugby Sevens on Day 6 of the Rio 2016 Olympics at Deodoro Stadium on August 11, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by David Rogers/Getty Images)
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Olympic coaches don’t receive gold medals. Fiji Olympic men’s rugby coach Ben Ryan may have gotten something better anyway.

Ryan’s reward for guiding Fiji to its first Olympic medal in any sport — gold in rugby sevens’ Olympic debut — included three acres of land in Fiji and a new name, Ratu Peni Raiyani Latianara, according to Fijian reports.

Ryan, a London native, is stepping down as coach of the Fijian team. The 44-year-old coached the team for three years after leading the England national sevens team for six years.

MORE: Fiji wins nation’s first Olympic medal

Aksel Lund Svindal says season, career still at risk after crash

Aksel Lund Svindal
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OSLO, Norway (AP) — Norwegian skier Aksel Lund Svindal says the knee injury that took him out of the World Cup last season was worse than he’s been letting on.

Svindal was the overall World Cup leader when he injured his right knee in a crash during a downhill in Kitzbuehel, Austria, on Jan. 23. Watch video of the crash here.

In an interview with Norwegian broadcaster NRK, Svindal said not only did he rupture a cruciate ligament, he also damaged his meniscus and cartilage.

Svindal, who won a medal of every color at the 2010 Vancouver Winter Games, is back on skis training for the upcoming World Cup season.

But he said the cartilage problems are particularly worrisome and could put the season, and even his career, at risk.

MORE: Lindsey Vonn wants to race men, retire in 2019