Zach Parise

U.S. Olympic men’s hockey roster includes 13 from Vancouver Games

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The two biggest American stars from the 2010 Olympic gold-medal game are back for Sochi.

Goalie Ryan Miller and forward Zach Parise were among 13 returning Olympians on the 25-man U.S. roster announced after the Winter Classic on New Year’s Day. In Sochi, the U.S. will look to improve on a surprise silver-medal performance from Vancouver.

Miller backstopped the U.S.’ improbable run to the Vancouver gold-medal game, where Parise scored a game-tying goal with 25 seconds left before Sidney Crosby won it for Canada in overtime.

“It’s very special to represent your country at that magnitude, where everyone’s focused watching it,” Miller said before the announcement, according to The Associated Press. “For me, it’s another chance to play in the tournament where there’s a chance to win something. You focus, take it seriously.”

Olympic hockey rosters: U.S. | Canada | Russia | Sweden | Finland | Czech Republic | Slovakia | Switzerland | Latvia | Norway | Austria | Slovenia

Miller or fellow 2010 Olympian Jonathan Quick is expected to start in goal for the U.S., beginning with a group-play game against Slovakia on Feb. 13 at 7:30 a.m. ET on NBCSN. Quick hasn’t played since Nov. 12 due to a groin injury.

Jimmy Howard is the third goalie, beating out Ben BishopCory Schneider and Tim Thomas for the last spot.

“It’s a tremendous honor,” Howard said on NBC. “Words can’t really put it in perspective.”

Parise is one of nine returning 2010 Olympic forwards, including Patrick Kane and Phil Kessel. Another 2010 Olympic forward, Bobby Ryan, was perhaps the most surprising omission. Five forwards are first-time Olympians.

ProHockeyTalk: Biggest snubs

The eight-man blue-line crew includes 2010 Olympians Ryan Suter and Brooks Orpik. Missing was Jack Johnson, best remembered from Vancouver for attending the Opening Ceremony between NHL games.

A first-time Olympic defenseman is perhaps the best story, if he can play.

Paul Martin was on the 2006 Olympic taxi squad with Miller and Matt Cullen as potential injury replacements but didn’t play in Torino. Martin then made the 2010 Olympic team outright but gave way to an injury replacement due to his broken left arm.

But Martin has a fractured tibia and, as of Wednesday, was still unable to skate.

As experienced as it is, the U.S. will not include any players with multiple Olympics under their belts for the first time since NHLers were allowed into the Winter Games in 1998.

But it will be vastly more seasoned than the 2010 team, which included three players with prior Olympic experience.

Here’s the full roster:

Goalies
Ryan Miller — 2010 Olympian
Jonathan Quick — 2010 Olympian
Jimmy Howard

Defensemen
Brooks Orpik — 2010 Olympian
Ryan Suter — 2010 Olympian
John Carlson
Justin Faulk
Cam Fowler
Paul Martin
Ryan McDonagh
Kevin Shattenkirk

Forwards
David Backes — 2010 Olympian
Dustin Brown — 2010 Olympian
Ryan Callahan — 2010 Olympian
Patrick Kane — 2010 Olympian
Ryan Kesler — 2010 Olympian
Phil Kessel — 2010 Olympian
Zach Parise — 2010 Olympian
Joe Pavelski — 2010 Olympian
Paul Stastny — 2010 Olympian
T.J. Oshie
Max Pacioretty
Derek Stepan
James van Riemsdyk
Blake Wheeler

U.S. Olympic women’s hockey roster marked by youth

Mikaela Shiffrin wrestles with doubt in seconds before World Cup downhill debut

Mikaela Shiffrin, of the United States, skis during the third training run for the World Cup women's downhill ski race in Lake Louise, Alberta, Thursday, Dec. 1, 2016. (Jonathan Hayward/The Canadian Press via AP)
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After a momentary panic in the start house, Mikaela Shiffrin raced to a tie for 18th in the first downhill of her World Cup career in Lake Louise, Alberta, on Friday.

Shiffrin, the youngest Olympic slalom champion who has also won a World Cup giant slalom, has been slowly adding the speed events of super-G and downhill to her repertoire the last two seasons.

“It wasn’t bad,” Shiffrin said, according to SkiRacing.com. “I certainly didn’t risk anything crazy.”

Her result Friday, 1.99 seconds behind Slovenian winner Ilka Stuhec, came after Shiffrin was 18th, 24th and 30th fastest in downhill training runs the previous three days. Shiffrin also had to wait several minutes in the start house as the racer before her crashed (video here).

“That was just a bummer,” Shiffrin said, according to the Denver Post. “I was like, ‘Just don’t let it affect you,’ but being up there for 10 minutes, like, ‘What happened? What’s taking them so long? What’s going on? Is she hurt?’

“Then I started doubting myself, like my technique going off the jumps, which is actually pretty good. I was going back and forth between, ‘Should I even be doing this? Maybe I just should pull out because I don’t want to kill myself.’ Then I’m like, ‘You’re absolutely fine, you haven’t felt sketched out a single time on this track in the past three days, so stick with that. You don’t have to go crazy.'”

“To be fast in speed there certainly needs to be a certain level of risk, and I know that, but now, if [giant slalom] and slalom are my main priority this season, I don’t need to be going crazy in a downhill with flat light and after I got iced [waiting so long],” Shiffrin said, according to SkiRacing.com.

Stuhec won Friday’s race by .22 of a second over Italian Sofia Goggia. Swede Kajsa Kling was third.

A race replay can be seen here. Full results are here.

Lindsey Vonn, owner of a record 18 wins at Lake Louise, is missing the annual World Cup stop in Alberta due to a broken arm from a November crash. Vonn had raced at Lake Louise each of the previous 15 seasons.

Last season, Shiffrin made her World Cup debut in the super-G at Lake Louise and finished 15th.

The women have another downhill Saturday and a super-G on Sunday in Lake Louise, both streaming live on NBCSports.com and the NBC Sports app (schedule here).

MORE: Vonn eyes January return from her most painful injury

High-speed crash at World Cup downhill in Lake Louise (video)

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Swiss Joana Haehlen crashed into netting at high speed during a World Cup downhill at Lake Louise, Alberta, on Friday.

Haehlen, 24, lost her right ski after landing from a jump and sped uncontrollably off course. She braced for impact, slammed into red netting and was turned around before landing with neither of her skis still attached.

She lay on the snow while being attended to and eventually skied down the mountain on her own.

It caused a 10-minute delay before the next skier, American Mikaela Shiffrin, could take her run.

VIDEO: Vonn details the most painful injury of her career