Dennis Rodman

Dennis Rodman says he’s gotten death threats, wants Olympic spirit in North Korea

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Dennis Rodman is in North Korea, again, with a cavalcade of 1990s NBA players.

Before that, he had a quick stop over in Beijing, where he said he’s received death threats about his North Korea visits and appealed to the spirit of the Olympics.

“Sooner or later, we have to get along,” Rodman told a man with a camera at Beijing Capital International Airport. “It’s like saying, ‘Why do we have Olympics?’ Everyone comes together in Olympics. There’s no problems. That’s what I’m doing. That’s all I’m doing.”

For the record, Rodman never competed in the Olympics.

Rodman is planning a game with former NBA and street basketball players as a birthday present for North Korean leader Kim Jong Un.

“It’s about doing one thing, trying to connect two countries together in the world to let people know, you know what, not every country in the planet is that bad,” Rodman said. “Especially North Korea. People say so many negative things about North Korea. I want people in the world to see it’s not that bad.”

As for Kim executing his uncle? Does something like that worry him?

“I’ve had my life in danger so many times in America and around the world, stuff like that,” Rodman said. “Since I’ve been going to North Korea, a lot of people in America have been sending me a lot of death threats, stuff like that. I don’t care, man. It’s not about that. It’s about people.”

The team includes Kenny AndersonVin BakerDoug ChristieSleepy Floyd, Craig HodgesCliff Robinson and Charles Smith.

“A lot of people want to think of this as self-preservation, something like that, and motivation for me to be famous,” Rodman said. “It’s not about that, brother.”

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The secret messages Lindsey Vonn wrote on her Olympic race suit

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SCHEDULE UPDATE: Vonn will will return for the final women’s downhill training run on Monday at 9 p.m. ET. LIVE STREAM

Look closely at Lindsey Vonn.

When NBC cameras zoom in on the two-time Olympic medalist, viewers will notice that she wrote a couple of messages on her uniform in permanent marker.

On the thumb of her right glove, Vonn has the word “believe” in Greek. It mirrors a tattoo she has on the inside of a finger.

“Signifying my last Olympics [in 2018] and just need to believe in myself,” Vonn said to NBC’s Nick Zaccardi.

On her helmet, Vonn has the initials “D.K.” and a heart. It is meant to honor her late grandfather, Don Kildow.

Kildow, who served in the Korean War from 1952-54, died on Nov. 1. Watch to learn more about Vonn’s special relationship with her grandparents:

Hard falls at Olympics, but no hard rules about concussions

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PYEONGCHANG, South Korea (AP) — At the bottom of the Olympic aerials landing hill, where crashes are common and the term “slap back” is part of the everyday lingo, skiers spend almost as much time figuring out how to protect their heads as they do working on all those flips and spins.

“We learn how to fall,” U.S. jumper Jon Lillis said.

Elsewhere around the action-sports venue, that’s not so much the case.

Concussion dangers lurk everywhere — from the iced-over deck of the halfpipe, to the steeply pitched landings on the slopestyle course, to the careening twists and turns of the snowboard cross track, to the aerials course, where “slap back” is the term for when a skier’s head slaps backward against the snow. But at the Olympics, there are no hard-and-fast rules regarding who diagnoses head injuries, and no hard-and-fast protocol that athletes must clear to be allowed back on the slopes after a concussion.

“A bit concerning,” says neurologist Kevin Weber of the Ohio State Wexner Medical Center. “Because you worry that athletes in other sports that may not be as popular as football are getting, I wouldn’t say ignored, but the concussions they’re getting are under-scrutinized.”

Read the full story at NBCOlympics.com