Sidney Crosby

Canada names Olympic hockey roster, led by Sidney Crosby

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Canada will again look to Sidney Crosby to lead it to Olympic gold in men’s hockey.

Crosby was the star of the 25-man team announced Tuesday. In Sochi, Canada will attempt to become the first nation to win back-to-back Olympic men’s hockey gold medals since the Soviet Union era.

It has not won an Olympic title on non-North American ice since Oslo 1952, but there is no doubt Canada is the most talented nation in the 12-team field.

Goalie Roberto Luongo, who took over for Martin Brodeur at the Vancouver Games, suffered an ankle injury Saturday, but it does not appear serious.

Luongo or Olympic rookie Carey Price is expected to be Canada’s starter in Sochi. The third goalie is Mike Smith of the Phoenix Coyotes.

Olympic hockey rosters: U.S. | Canada | RussiaSwedenFinland | Czech Republic | Slovakia | Switzerland | Latvia | Norway | Austria | Slovenia

Tampa Bay Lightning sniper Steven Stamkos was named to the team despite his broken tibia. If he is unable to play, he can be replaced up to Jan. 12.

The notable omissions were forwards Claude Giroux and Martin St. Louis. St. Louis is the captain of the Tampa Bay Lightning, whose GM, Steve Yzerman, is Canada’s GM.

Canada was dealt another blow with forward Logan Couture set to undergo surgery Wednesday. He was also left off.

In their place, Canada went with the likes of Patrick MarleauJamie Benn and Chris Kunitz, who were seen as bubble players.

The defense is led by 2010 Olympians Shea WeberDuncan Keith and Drew DoughtyDan Hamhuis was selected over the likes of Brent Seabrook and Dan Boyle.

Here’s the full Canada roster:

Goalies
Roberto Luongo — Vancouver Canucks
Carey Price — Montreal Canadiens
Mike Smith — Phoenix Coyotes

Defensemen
Jay Bouwmeester — St. Louis Blues
Drew Doughty — Los Angeles Kings
Dan Hamhuis — Vancouver Canucks
Duncan Keith — Chicago Blackhawks
Alex Pietrangelo — St. Louis Blues
P.K. Subban — Montreal Canadiens
Marc-Edouard Vlasic — San Jose Sharks
Shea Weber — Nashville Predators

Forwards
Jamie Benn — Dallas Stars
Patrice Bergeron — Boston Bruins
Jeff Carter — Los Angeles Kings
Sidney Crosby — Pittsburgh Penguins
Matt Duchene — Colorado Avalanche
Ryan Getzlaf — Anaheim Ducks
Chris Kunitz — Pittsburgh Penguins
Patrick Marleau — San Jose Sharks
Rick Nash — New York Rangers
Corey Perry — Detroit Red Wings
Patrick Sharp — Chicago Blackhawks
Steven Stamkos — Tampa Bay Lightning
John Tavares — New York Islanders
Jonathan Toews — Chicago Blackhawks

Ten swimmers to watch at USA Swimming National Championships

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The U.S. team for the world swimming championships will be determined this week, and it’s going to include some new faces.

Absent are the retired Michael Phelps and Maya DiRado, suspended Ryan Lochte and recovering Missy Franklin.

Katie Ledecky is the headliner, but there are of course many others who will emerge this week as medal favorites for Budapest next month.

The top two per individual event at the USA Swimming National Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast, are in line to make the world team. Plus extra swimmers in the 100m and 200m frees for relays.

MORE: Broadcast Schedule | Event Schedule/Results

Here are 10 swimmers to watch in Indianapolis from Tuesday through Saturday:

Mallory Comerford
No Olympic experience

The rising Louisville junior tied Katie Ledecky for the NCAA 200-yard freestyle title on March 17. Remember, Ledecky is undefeated in 15 individual finals at the Olympics, World Championships and Pan Pacific Championships. It was all the more surprising given Comerford, who is five months younger than Ledecky, was 12th and 13th in the 100m and 200m frees at the Olympic Trials. She enters nationals ranked Nos. 2 and 5 in the 100m and 200m freestyles, respectively.

Madisyn Cox
No Olympic experience

Cox is the best all-around female swimmer in the U.S. aside from Ledecky. She ranks second this year in both individual medleys and the 200m breaststroke. The former University of Texas standout is the direct beneficiary of Ledecky opting not to swim the 400m IM on Thursday, given Ledecky is fastest in the U.S. this year in that event. Cox was fourth in both IMs at the Olympic Trials.

Lilly King
Olympic 100m breast champion

Best known for finger-wagging Yuliya Efimova and then beating the Russian in Rio. King actually ranks No. 2 — in the U.S. — this year in the 100m breast behind Rio bronze medalist Katie Meili. Meili has also been 2.72 seconds faster than King this year in the 200m breast, an event King is trying to improve after being eliminated in the Olympic semifinals.

Katie Ledecky
Five-time Olympic champion

It would be shocking if Ledecky does not win the 200m, 400m, 800m and (if she races it) 1500m frees this week. The intrigue comes in the 100m free, which Ledecky did not contest at this meet four years ago. She lowered her 100m free personal best from 56.00 to 53.75 in the last four years and enters Tuesday’s event ranked No. 5 in the U.S. this year (same as her ranking last year). No doubt Ledecky has the talent to make the 4x100m free relay at worlds (as she did at the Olympics), but could she make the 100m free team outright by finishing top two?

Simone Manuel
Four-time Rio Olympic medalist

Manuel is comfortably the fastest U.S. woman this year in the 50m and 100m frees, where she earned silver and gold in Rio. She’s also ranked No. 4 in the 200m free, and only .18 behind No. 2, after handing Ledecky two defeats in the NCAA 200-yard free this past season.

Michael Andrew
No Olympic experience

Andrew, who turned professional at age 14 in 2013, is entered in nine events this week. No way he swims them all, but could this be the year Andrew fulfills promise and makes his first major international meet? He ranks fourth in the 50m free and third in the 200m individual medley nationally this year but has been best known in recent years for his breaststroke. His best Olympic Trials finish was fourth in the 100m breast.

Caeleb Dressel
Olympic 4x100m free relay champion

Dressel memorably delievered under pressure in Rio, setting a personal best in his first Olympic swim leading off the 4x100m free relay final. Dressel went even faster in his three 100m free swims, placing sixth overall. At age 20, Dressel already holds NCAA records in the 50- and 100-yard frees, plus the 100-yard butterfly. Is he ready to overtake Nathan Adrian as the top U.S. sprinter?

Anthony Ervin
Two-time Olympic 50m free champion

At 36, Ervin is the oldest swimmer at nationals by three years. He defied age most recently in Rio, becoming the oldest individual Olympic swimming champion in winning the 50m freestyle a whopping 16 years after sharing gold in the event in Sydney. Ervin hasn’t shown that kind of form this year. He ranks No. 16 in the U.S. in the 50m free.

Chase Kalisz
Olympic 400m IM silver medalist

No U.S. male swimmer has been more impressive this season than Kalisz. In a three-day span in May, he set personal bests in the 200m IM and the 200m breaststroke, swam the second-best 200m butterfly of his life and posted the then-fastest time in the world this year in the 400m IM. Kalisz is entered in three events this week and owns the fastest time in the U.S. this year in all of them — 200m and 400m IM and 200m butterfly.

Ryan Murphy
Three-time Rio Olympic champion

Murphy may have swept the backstrokes in Rio, but he is ranked second in the country this year in the 100m and 200m distances. London Olympic champion Matt Grevers has been faster in the 100m back. Rio Olympic teammate Jacob Pebley tops the 200m back. Still, it would be a shock to not see Murphy swimming both in Budapest, plus perhaps the 50m back.

MORE: King to be less vocal on Efimova topic this summer

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Tori Bowie does not want to double at world champs

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Add Tori Bowie to the list of sprinters not looking to double at the world championships in August.

Bowie won the 100m and finished third in the 200m at the USATF Outdoor Championships, part of the TeamUSA Summer Champions Series, presented by Comcast.

That put her on the U.S. team for worlds in London in both sprints.

But Bowie, who earned Rio 100m silver and 200m bronze, was exhausted after four days of racing in Sacramento heat that eclipsed 110 degrees.

“I for sure don’t want to do the double [at worlds],” Bowie said Sunday. “I just wanted to give myself an option [to race the 100m or the 200m].”

Bowie said she and her coaches will probably decide her racing schedule for worlds in the next two to three weeks.

“More than anything I wanted to try to get this 100m right and try to achieve a gold medal somewhere,” Bowie said, according to TeamUSA.org. “I don’t have a gold medal yet individually, so that’s my main concern right now.”

If Bowie drops the 100m, Olympian Morolake Akinosun is in line to take her spot. If she drops the 200m, it’s Ariana Washington.

“I already experienced that, I did the double in Rio,” Bowie said. “I collected my two medals that I wanted to collect in both events. Right now, I’m satisfied.”

Deajah Stevens and Christian Coleman also made the U.S. team in both the 100m and 200m and are expected to compete in both events.

Meanwhile, both Olympic 200m champions — Usain Bolt and Elaine Thompson — are expected to sit out the 200m in London to focus on the 100m.

World 200m silver medalist Justin Gatlin, 2012 Olympic 200m champion Allyson Felix and LaShawn Merritt all pulled out of the 200m at USATF Outdoors, ruling out world championships doubles.

Gatlin doubled in 2015. Felix doubled in 2011 (200m and 400m) and tried to for Rio but finished fourth in the 200m at the Olympic Trials. Merritt raced the 200m and 400m in Rio.

Both Olympic 400m champions — Wayde van Niekerk of South Africa and Shaunae Miller-Uibo of the Bahamas — plan to also race the 200m at worlds.

MORE: Centrowitz recovers from ‘rock bottom’ to make world team

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