Gracie good as gold as she captures U.S. Figure Skating Championships title

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BOSTON — Saturday night in Boston it was a gold for Gold.

Two-time national champion Ashley Wagner fell twice in her free skate, opening the door for teenager Gracie Gold – with a name to match – to capture her first U.S. Championships at TD Garden.

Fifteen-year-old Polina Edmunds scored a 193.63, bettering Wagner by 10 points to seal silver. 2010 Olympian Mirai Nagasu also finished ahead of Wagner, taking the bronze medal.

“It’s embarrassing as two-time national champion to put out a performance like this,” Wagner said after her free skate. “As soon as they called my name my legs felt like lead. I couldn’t shake it out.”

The U.S. Figure Skating Association will name the three women to its Olympic team Sunday at a press conference. A committee selects the team on the past year’s results, not just those from Nationals.

Wagner has been in the top six at the World Championships the last two years and has won medals at the Grand Prix Final, including a bronze in December.

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“We’ll see what happens after this,” Wagner said. “Luckily I had a decent season so that definitely helps my case.”

Edmunds, whose mother grew up in Russia, stated her case for the team.

“I think tonight was the night where we had to prove ourselves and I did prove myself,” said the teenager, who was skating in her first-ever senior event. “I think Ashley is a phenomenal skater, but everyone has been working hard for these Nationals. The results are the results. Everyone has a dream to go to Sochi.”

She added: “I would be pretty disappointed because I was in second place.”

Gold was the one who undoubtedly proved herself the most on Saturday night, only bobbling on one triple jump but staying upright for the four-plus minutes of her free skate to “Sleeping Beauty.”

After landing her second double Axel of the free skate, Gold pumped her fists as she skated, obviously overcome with the reality of her effort.

“I knew that was it,” she said. “It was kind of unreal. It was like a fairy tale.”

Gold, Nagasu and Wagner all skated two Grand Prix events this season while Edmunds competed in the junior ranks.

“Going to Sochi would be a dream come true,” Gold, who’s coached by the legendary Frank Carroll, told reporters.

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Results
1. Gracie Gold – 211.69
2. Polina Edmunds – 193.63
3. Mirai Nagasu – 190.74
4. Ashley Wagner – 182.74
5. Samantha Cesario – 173.97

U.S. swimming greats pay tribute to Chuck Wielgus

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The death of longtime USA Swimming chief Chuck Wielgus led to an outpouring of tributes from the swimming community on Sunday.

Wielgus died of complications from colon cancer at age 67.

He had battled the cancer for more than 10 years, undergoing regular chemotherapy while overseeing incredible growth and success for the organization.

In January, Wielgus annnounced he would retire from his USA Swimming executive director post this September after 20 years at the helm.

A sampling of reaction from U.S. Olympic swimming champions and coaches from Sunday:

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U.S. diving moves on without David Boudia

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ATLANTA (AP) — These days, the pool deck seems a little empty for the U.S. diving team.

Someone’s missing.

David Boudia.

He was the stalwart of the American program for the better part of the decade, the guy who usually came through at the biggest meets.

“It’s going to be weird … not having David there,” said Steele Johnson, a good friend of Boudia’s and former synchronized partner. “But at the same time, it’s a new generation.”

After winning two more Olympic medals in Rio, Boudia decided to take a year off and may be done for good. His wife is having their second child, and there’s not much left to accomplish at age 27.

With a little over three years to go before the Tokyo Olympics, the U.S. is already moving toward filling the huge hole that Boudia’s retirement would leave.

“I’m sure everyone has felt that same way about other people,” Johnson said. “Like when Mark Ruiz retired or Laura Wilkinson first retired, all these awesome people, it’s always different. But it’s a good change. Generational change needs to happen.”

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There are some experienced divers for the U.S. team to build around, including Johnson, a silver medalist with Boudia in synchronized platform at the Rio Games last summer, and the springboard team of Sam Dorman and Michael Hixon, who also captured a silver in synchro springboard.

Several promising youngsters are working their way up, as well, most notably 14-year-old Tarrin Gilliland.

During a recent meet in Atlanta, the Texas teen qualified for a pair of synchronized events at the July world championships in Budapest, Hungary. Gilliland paired with Olympian Jessica Parratto to win the women’s platform and joined Andrew Capobianco to claim victory in the mixed platform, a non-Olympic event.

Yep, it’s going to be quite a summer break for the high school freshman.

“The plan is to keep getting stronger and healthier and start getting my dives more consistent, and maybe add some (degree of difficulty) in there,” Gilliland said. “And just have fun during the process.”

Everyone realizes that not having Boudia puts a huge burden on the rest of the divers to step up their performances, especially if they want to have any chance against the powerful Chinese team.

Boudia had a hand in two of the three diving medals the Americans won in Rio, also taking an individual bronze in the platform.

He also captured two medals in London, including a stunning gold in 10-meter — the first Olympic win for the U.S. in a dozen years — along with a synchronized bronze off the big tower.

Throw in Boudia’s performances at the next-biggest meet on the calendar, and it’s clear how much he meant to the program. Over the last five world championships, he earned four silvers and a bronze.

“David Boudia obviously offered a lot of leadership and he had a lot of experience, so he was a role model to a lot of us,” said Kassidy Cook, a Rio Olympian. “But I think that a lot of other people, like Sam and Mikey and me, we can pick up where he kind of left us off. He’s left us with a lot of good advice and some good leadership roles to fill in. Although we will miss him if he doesn’t come back, we can definitely keep up the positive attitude and hard-working vibes transitioning into this next Olympics.”

Boudia still takes time to mentor Johnson and other young divers based in Indiana.

But Johnson, who is only 20, knows it will be on him and the other Olympic veterans to work with those who haven’t experienced those sort of high-pressure meets.

“Leading into the Olympic year, I really learned from David, through all the World Series meets, how to really handle each competition with different environments and different competitors,” Johnson recalled. “It’s just a lot of learning over these next few years, but it’s a lot of fun interaction with each other.”

He is eager to see how divers such as Gilliland and 15-year-old Maria Coburn, who qualified for worlds in synchronized 3-meter, fare in Budapest.

No matter what the result, the experience they gain will be invaluable.

“It’s good for them to get their feet wet now, with three years left leading up,” Johnson said. “There’s time for growth. You may not go in and win world championships your first time. You may never win. But you’re going to go into these competitions and you’re going to learn from those experiences. That’s what I did the first couple of years when David and I competed.”

As part of the development process, the coaches have paired of up veterans with some of the most promising newcomers. Parratto has taken Gilliland under her wing. Coburn will compete at worlds with Cook.

Synchro diving has become a huge emphasis for the U.S., contributing heavily to its renewed success at the last two Olympics. The Americans were shut out in both 2004 and 2008, an embarrassing fall for a program that once dominated the international scene with stars such as Greg Louganis. But synchro, in which only eight teams compete in a single round of competition, provides a much better chance of reaching the medal stand.

“Synchro has definitely been a main focus for the United States,” Cook said. “You only have to beat five teams to get on the podium. That is definitely the best shot for a medal at the Olympics and the world championships.”

That will continue to be the strategy heading toward Tokyo.

With or without Boudia.

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