Jeremy Abbott

Jeremy Abbott, Jason Brown named to U.S. Olympic Team

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The U.S. will send something old and something new in men’s figure skating to the Sochi Olympics.

U.S. Figure Skating finalized its 15-skater roster by naming Jeremy Abbott and Jason Brown to the Olympic Team on Sunday night, a couple of hours after they went one-two at the U.S. Championships in Boston.

Abbott, 28, is the oldest male singles figure skater to make the U.S. Olympic Team since Todd Eldredge in 2002. He has never won an Olympic or World Championships medal, but Abbott now has as many U.S. titles as Olympic champions Scott Hamilton and Brian Boitano and twice as many as Evan Lysacek.

“Four-time national champion is just crazy,” Abbott told reporters Sunday. “I’m just a small-town boy. I never thought I’d be here.”

Abbott infamously imploded at the 2010 Olympics, finishing ninth after beating Lysacek at the U.S. Championships a month earlier.

Brown, 19, is the first teenage male singles skater to make the U.S. Olympic Team since 1976. The ponytailed Riverdancer is in his first season as a senior-level skater after taking bronze and silver at the last two World Junior Championships.

Together, Abbott and Brown face a steep hill toward a medal in Sochi. The gold- and silver-medal favorites, in some order, are three-time reigning world champion Canadian Patrick Chan and Japan’s Yuzuru Hanyu, who beat Chan at the Grand Prix Final in December.

The door for bronze has opened this season with the struggles and injuries to Spain’s Javier Fernandez and Kazakhstan’s Denis Ten. It’s also hard to gauge the ceilings of Russian three-time Olympic medalist Yevgeny Plushenko, if he’s selected, and Japan’s second- and third-best skaters, Tatsuki Machida and Daisuke Takahashi.

U.S. men’s skating has been on the decline since Lysacek’s gold in 2010. It hasn’t qualified to send more than two skaters to either of the last two World Championships nor for these Olympics.

The U.S. has placed a men’s singles skater sixth or higher at every Olympics since 1936. That streak is in jeopardy.

Here is the full U.S. Olympic Figure Skating Team:

Men
Jeremy Abbott
Jason Brown

Women
Polina Edmunds
Gracie Gold
Ashley Wagner

Pairs
Marissa Castelli/Simon Shnapir
Felicia Zhang/Nathan Bartholomay

Ice Dance
Madison Chock/Evan Bates
Meryl Davis/Charlie White
Maia Shibutani/Alex Shibutani

Meet youngest U.S. Winter Olympian since 1998

Max Parrot, Julia Marino win Big Air at Fenway Park snowboarding

Max Parrot
Reuters
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Canadian Olympic snowboarder Max Parrot and American Julia Marino swept the first Big Air at Fenway Park events on Thursday night.

Parrot, who finished fifth in the Sochi Olympic slopestyle competition, had the highest-scoring run of all competitors in gusty conditions at the home of the Boston Red Sox.

He tallied a 96.25 in his second of three runs. The combined score of his first two runs — 183.50 — held up so that his last run was a victory lap.

Parrot gained attention in Sochi for being one of two Canadian snowboarders to call out Shaun White for pulling out before the slopestyle competition.

White didn’t compete Thursday. Olympic slopestyle champions Sage Kotsenburg (training crash) and Jamie Anderson (eliminated in qualifying) did compete, but not in the finals.

Big air, which debuts at the Olympics at Pyeongchang 2018, is most like slopestyle of the current Olympic snowboard disciplines. The key difference is that big air runs include one jump, while slopestyle is a course of several jumps and rails.

Earlier, American Julia Marino was the surprise women’s winner at Fenway, tallying a two-run total of 169.25. Marino, 18, was a forerunner who got into the field when U.S. Olympian Ty Walker withdrew.

Riders competed Thursday with wind gusts up to 25 miles per hour, NBC Sports’ Tina Dixon said. Their bibs flapped uncontrollably at the top of the 140-foot-high jump, nearly four times the height of the adjacent Green Monster.

“The wind definitely created a nervous factor for me, and I’m sure all the other riders, too,” Marino, a Connecticut native, said on NBCSN. “It was crazy windy up there. But the fact is the jump itself wasn’t as winded down below. … I’ve been to Boston so many times, and I’ve walked past this ballpark a ton. To be snowboarding here, it’s insane.”

Big Air at Fenway concludes Friday with ski big air, live on NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra at 9 p.m. ET.

MORE: Shaun White explains ‘shock’ of missing X Games

Sage Kotsenburg cracks helmet in Fenway Big Air crash

Sage Kotsenburg
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Olympic snowboard slopestyle champion Sage Kotsenburg crashed in training and suffered a concussion before the finals of the Big Air at Fenway Park in Boston on Thursday evening, according to his Twitter.

The U.S. Ski and Snowboard Association said Kotsenburg hit his head in the crash but couldn’t confirm a concussion diagnosis.

Kotsenburg, 22, was to be the headliner of the finals after fellow Olympic slopestyle champion Jamie Anderson was eliminated in earlier qualifying.

Big Air at Fenway was to be Kotsenburg’s final competition of the season, according to Sports Illustrated. He finished 10th in snowboard slopestyle at the Winter X Games two weeks ago.

Kotsenburg has said he would like to compete in slopestyle and big air at the Pyeongchang 2018 Winter Olympics, where big air will make its Winter Games debut.

NBCSN and NBC Sports Live Extra will have coverage of the final day of Big Air at Fenway on Friday for the ski slopestyle finals at 9 p.m. ET.

MORE: Shaun White discusses ‘shock’ of missing X Games