Justine Dufour-Lapointe, Chloe Dufour-Lapointe, Maxime Dufour-Lapointe

Canada names three Dufour-Lapointe sisters to Olympic Team

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It’s conceivable that a Dufour-Lapointe could win gold, silver and bronze in women’s moguls at the Sochi Olympics.

Canada announced the three sisters, Maxime (24), Chloe (22) and Justine (19), as part of its Olympic freestyle skiing team Monday.

It is the fifth time in Olympic history at least three siblings will compete in the same Winter Olympic event together, according to OlympStats.com, the second time in an individual event and first time in an individual event since 1976.

Here is the list of other sets of siblings to compete together:

1960 — Anne-Marie, Marguerite and Therese Leduc (France), Alpine skiing
1976 — Marcos Luis, Martín Tomás and Matias Jose Jerman (Argentina), Cross-country skiing
1980 — Anton, Marian and Peter Stastny (Czechoslovakia), Hockey
1988 — Jorge, Jose, Luis Adrian and Roberto Tames (Mexico), Bobsled

OlympStats points out the Ochoa family from Spain had five siblings compete in the Olympics but not all in the same event or in the same year.

The Dufour-Lapointes could become the first set of siblings to sweep a single Olympic podium. Each Dufour-Lapointe has made at least one podium this season.

Chloe and Justine went one-two in Sunday’s moguls in Val St. Come, Quebec. They rank second, third and fifth behind Olympic champion Hannah Kearney in the World Cup standings, the best indicator of Olympic medal prospects.

Their rank is in inverse order of their age — youngest Justine is No. 2 and oldest Maxime is No. 5. Chloe is the only one with Olympic experience, but when she was named to the Olympic Team in 2010, it brought bittersweet emotions to their mother, Johane.

“Obviously, it hurts. It makes me sad, I can’t hide it,” she told the Montreal Gazette four years ago. “I am so proud of both Maxime and Chloe, whether they are Olympians or not, because of the people they are. But it would really be a dream to one day see three Dufour-Lapointe sisters at the Olympics.”

Like most athletic siblings, they are quite competitive.

“Most of the time one is calling home crying, one is medium happy with her performance and one is really happy,” Johane told the Toronto Star in March. “They are competitors now but they will always be sisters.”

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Lindsey Vonn sets date for proposal to enter men’s race

ALTENMARKT/ZAUCHENSEE, AUSTRIA - JANUARY 15: Lindsey Vonn of USA celebrates during the Audi FIS Alpine Ski World Cup Women's Downhill on January 15, 2017 in Altenmarkt/Zauchensee, Austria (Photo by Christophe Pallot/Agence Zoom/Getty Images)
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The U.S. Ski Team plans to submit a proposal in the spring for Lindsey Vonn to be able to race against men in November 2018, according to the Denver Post.

“I know I’m not going to win, but I would like to at least have the opportunity to try,” Vonn said, according to the newspaper. “I think I’ve won enough World Cups where I should have enough respect within the industry to be able to have that opportunity.”

Vonn’s idea is to race in Lake Louise, Canada, an annual late fall stop on both the men’s and women’s World Cup schedules. The men generally race in Lake Louise one week before the women do.

Vonn’s greatest success has come at Lake Louise, with 18 victories in 41 downhill and super-G starts dating to 2001.

Vonn previously requested in 2012 to be able to race against men in Lake Louise, but that was denied by the International Ski Federation (FIS). The federation said then “that one gender is not entitled to participate in races of the other.”

It doesn’t look like the federation’s stance has changed.

“You can set up a day where a female racer can compete against men racers, just as a show, but it has nothing to do with competition,” FIS women’s race director Atle Skaardal said, according to the Denver Post. “I don’t see that it’s going to change in the next years — no driving forces to urge a change like that. This is something the teams could do also in training. But why would you want to have a competition in this direction?

“I just don’t see the interest. For me it’s a meaningless comparison. It doesn’t matter if she’s one second behind or a half-second ahead. We compete female against female and men against men. To me it doesn’t matter if one gender is faster or slower. It doesn’t mean it’s a good idea, just because it’s of interest to one racer. I haven’t heard of any other sport being dragged into this kind of position.”

Vonn raced for the first time in 322 days on Sunday, finishing 13th in a World Cup downhill in Austria. It was actually an encouraging result, as Vonn said she wasn’t skiing to her limit in her first race back.

Her upcoming goals are to compete in the 2018 Olympics, after missing Sochi due to injury, and earn 11 more World Cup wins to break Ingemar Stenmark‘s career record of 86 victories. She can overtake Stenmark next season if she stays healthy and continues to win at her usual pace.

Vonn said in the spring that she would postpone retirement by one year and compete in the 2018-19 season if it meant being able to race the men.

But Skaardal’s comments suggest that won’t be possible.

“It’s definitely frustrating to hear that he said that, because I respect Atle very much,” Vonn said, according to the Denver Post. “He does a great job on the World Cup, and he is a former racer, so he understands. It’s disappointing to hear he doesn’t support it. But maybe if we organize something and a plan is put in front of him, maybe he would change his mind. I think most of the men are supporting me.”

Vonn is expected to race this weekend in a downhill and super-G in Garmish-Partenkirchen, Germany, streamed live on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app.

MORE: Bode Miller plans to race next season, U.S. coach says

Wayne Gretzky compares Hayley Wickenheiser to NHL legend

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The greatest male hockey player of all time paid the greatest female player of all time quite the compliment at her retirement ceremony Saturday.

“You played with heart, desire, finesse, speed, skill,” Wayne Gretzky said to Hayley Wickenheiser. “The only other person, the greatest player to ever live, I think he would be happy if I said you were the female Gordie Howe. Congratulations.”

The Canadian legend Wickenheiser announced her retirement Friday, after six Olympics and four gold medals. On Saturday, she was honored before a Calgary Flames-Edmonton Oilers game. A highlight was a speech by Gretzky, who now works in the Oilers’ front office.

Wickenheiser’s first Olympics, Nagano 1998, marked the only Winter Games for Gretzky. Gretzky played in the first Olympics with NHL participation in Nagano, finishing fourth with Canada, and retired in 1999 without an Olympic medal.

“You’ve opened so many doors for so many young girls to be able to one day win a gold medal,” Gretzky said to Wickenheiser. “To me, that’s more important than anything.”

Wickenheiser then took the mic at center ice and reciprocated.

“A big part of why I play the game is because of this man standing right here, Wayne Gretzky,” she said, later adding, according to Canadian media, “In Salt Lake City [2002] when we won the gold medal, the first two people I saw when we stepped off the ice were Wayne and [former Oilers All-Star defenseman] Kevin [Lowe] standing in our dressing room cheering for us.”

As part of the Wickenheiser ceremony, a tribute video was played including messages from Canadian Olympian and Hall of Famer Mark Messier, NHL commissioner Gary Bettman and Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau.

MORE: Amanda Kessel sets sights on 2018 Olympics