Bryan Fletcher

Bryan Fletcher overcomes childhood cancer, makes U.S. Olympic Team

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Bryan Fletcher began experiencing headaches, sleeping a lot and losing weight around age 3.

His parents took him to a doctor, and he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

“When I first found out about it, I thought it was a death sentence,” his ski patrolman father, Tim, told Yahoo! Sports.

Bryan underwent several years of chemotherapy, including suffering a stroke, before his cancer went into remission by age 10. He entered kindergarten with a bald head but made light of his condition by painting it green and wearing a matching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles outfit.

The treatments, such as spinal taps, were excruciatingly painful to the point that Tim would hang onto Bryan as he screamed.

During that time, Bryan picked up Nordic combined. Ski jumping and cross-country skiing kept his spirits alive living in his hometown trademarked, “Ski Town USA.”

His doctors in Denver, a 2 1/2-hour drive away, didn’t want him to jump.

“At that point, I didn’t have a very great life expectancy [15 percent],” Bryan told the Deseret News. “So [my mom] just figured, ‘Let him do what he wants to do.'”

Fletcher persevered and had a shot at the 2010 Olympics until he fell down the stairs one month before the Vancouver Games and badly sprained an ankle. Younger brother Taylor made the team instead.

Bryan went, too, but as a volunteer forejumper to test out the ski jumping hill before the competition. Bryan had done the same as a 15-year-old at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics.

He didn’t give up and spent the last four years improving to become the top-ranked U.S. skier, even meeting the king of Norway after winning an event, and was named to the four-man Olympic Team on Wednesday. So was Taylor.

The battle with cancer will be on Bryan’s mind in Sochi. He teamed with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in Utah to select two children to design artwork on his helmet for the Olympics.

“I look back and think that dealing with cancer might have been a good thing,” Bryan told Steamboat Today. “If I could beat cancer, then I can beat any challenge in my life. It taught me to fight — especially when things get tough.”

U.S. Opening Ceremony uniforms unveiled 

Ashton Eaton named male IAAF Athlete of the Year

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American decathlete Ashton Eaton was named the 2015 male Athlete of the Year by the International Association of Athletics Federations, the world governing body for track and field. Ethiopia’s Genzebe Dibaba, the reigning world champion in the 1500m, was named the female IAAF Athlete of the Year.

Eaton is the first decathlete and just the eighth American man to win the title. Tyson Gay in 2007 was the last American man to be named.

The honor came due to Eaton’s world-record-setting performance at the world championships held in Beijing this past August. There he beat the previous record, his own from the 2012 Olympic Trials, by nine points. He also set a world record for running the fastest 400m portion of the decathlon in 45.00 seconds.

In the IAAF press release, Eaton said, “Athletes spend the most vigorous years of human life, arguably called the ‘best years’, working to hone their abilities. So, when an athlete competes, what people are witnessing is the manifestation of what a human being is capable of when they choose to direct all of their time and effort towards something.

“I’m grateful and thankful to the IAAF for excellent competitions, the canvases that allow us to display our work.”

He also acknowledged sprinter Usain Bolt and triple jumper Christian Taylor, who were also up for the title: “While I’m honored that I am considered the ‘artist’ of the year, I did not beat Usain and Christian; my work simply differed in design. They are some of the most talented and beautiful performers of all time. I’m flattered to be among them.”

Dibaba has been unbeaten in the 1500m over five races in 2015. Along with winning gold and setting a world record in the 1500 at the Beijing World Championships, Diababa won a bronze medal in the 5000m event.

She gratefully accepted the award, saying, “After being a finalist and narrowly missing out on this award one year ago, I am very proud to be recognized by the fans and experts of our sport.

“I had a great season and truly enjoyed competing around the world, from Monaco where I managed to establish a world record, to Beijing where I finally captured my first world outdoor title.”

Dibaba was recently featured in a family-themed promotional video for the 2016 Summer Olympics in Rio.

MORE: Seb Coe splits from Nike as IAAF president


Olympians celebrate Thanksgiving

Meryl Davis
Team USA/ Twitter
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Nov. 26 – or Thanksgiving to the rest of us – is oftentimes a typical training day for many Olympians and Olympic hopefuls. Here’s a look at how some of them spent the day training, competing, celebrating, and being thankful.

Workout football and food😁👍!!! Happy thanksgiving everyone!!!

A photo posted by Michael Phelps (@m_phelps00) on

Happy Thanksgiving from our cold cuts Turkey to yours! #family #happyhappyheart

A photo posted by @cammileadams on

Happy Thanksgiving from the SwimMAC Parade crew!

A photo posted by Tyler Clary (@tylerclary) on


MORE: NBC’s Thanksgiving Rio promo