Bryan Fletcher

Bryan Fletcher overcomes childhood cancer, makes U.S. Olympic Team

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Bryan Fletcher began experiencing headaches, sleeping a lot and losing weight around age 3.

His parents took him to a doctor, and he was diagnosed with acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

“When I first found out about it, I thought it was a death sentence,” his ski patrolman father, Tim, told Yahoo! Sports.

Bryan underwent several years of chemotherapy, including suffering a stroke, before his cancer went into remission by age 10. He entered kindergarten with a bald head but made light of his condition by painting it green and wearing a matching Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles outfit.

The treatments, such as spinal taps, were excruciatingly painful to the point that Tim would hang onto Bryan as he screamed.

During that time, Bryan picked up Nordic combined. Ski jumping and cross-country skiing kept his spirits alive living in his hometown trademarked, “Ski Town USA.”

His doctors in Denver, a 2 1/2-hour drive away, didn’t want him to jump.

“At that point, I didn’t have a very great life expectancy [15 percent],” Bryan told the Deseret News. “So [my mom] just figured, ‘Let him do what he wants to do.'”

Fletcher persevered and had a shot at the 2010 Olympics until he fell down the stairs one month before the Vancouver Games and badly sprained an ankle. Younger brother Taylor made the team instead.

Bryan went, too, but as a volunteer forejumper to test out the ski jumping hill before the competition. Bryan had done the same as a 15-year-old at the 2002 Salt Lake City Olympics.

He didn’t give up and spent the last four years improving to become the top-ranked U.S. skier, even meeting the king of Norway after winning an event, and was named to the four-man Olympic Team on Wednesday. So was Taylor.

The battle with cancer will be on Bryan’s mind in Sochi. He teamed with the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society in Utah to select two children to design artwork on his helmet for the Olympics.

“I look back and think that dealing with cancer might have been a good thing,” Bryan told Steamboat Today. “If I could beat cancer, then I can beat any challenge in my life. It taught me to fight — especially when things get tough.”

U.S. Opening Ceremony uniforms unveiled 

WATCH LIVE: London Marathon

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Watch the world’s best distance runners chase world records at the London Marathon, live on NBCSN and commercial free on the NBC Sports Gold “Track and Field Pass” for subscribers on Sunday at 3:30 a.m. ET.

NBCSN coverage also streams on NBCSports.com/live and the NBC Sports app for subscribers.

WATCH LIVE: London Marathon
NBCSN coverage — STREAM LINK
NBC Sports Gold commercial free — STREAM LINK

Sunday’s race start times (ET)
3:55 – Elite Wheelchair Races
4:00 – World Para Athletics Marathon World Cup ambulant races
4:15 – Elite Women’s Race
5:00 – Elite Men’s Race, Mass Race

The men’s field features arguably the two greatest distance runners of all time — Kenyan Eliud Kipchoge and Ethiopian Kenenisa Bekele.

Kipchoge, the Rio Olympic marathon champ, ran the fastest marathon ever recorded — 2:00:25 in Nike’s sub-two-hour attempt last May in non-record-eligible conditions.

Bekele is the second-fastest marathoner in history under legal conditions, having run six seconds shy of Kenyan Dennis Kimetto‘s world record of 2:02:57 from 2014.

In the women’s race, Kenyan Mary Keitany, already the world-record holder in a women’s-only race, looks to take down Brit Paula Radcliffe‘s world record with male pacers set in London 15 years ago. That time is 2:15:25.

Keitany is challenged by Ethiopian Tirunesh Dibaba, the third-fastest female marathoner in history behind Keitany and Radcliffe.

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Teddy Riner, dominant judoka, to skip 2018, 2019 Worlds

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French judoka Teddy Riner, arguably the world’s most dominant athlete, will reportedly skip the next two world championships before the 2020 Tokyo Olympics.

French coach Franck Chambily said Riner will compete a light international schedule the next two years ahead of what would be his fourth Olympics, according to Agence France-Presse.

Riner, a 29-year-old, 6-foot-8-inch native of Guadeloupe, is undefeated since 2010 with a reported 144-match winning streak. That includes Olympic titles in 2012 and 2016 and world titles in 2011, 2013, 2014, 2015 and 2017.

Before the streak, Riner also earned world titles in 2007, 2009 and 2010, plus an Olympic bronze at age 19 in 2008.

He could compete through the 2024 Paris Games.

“When I am invincible, I will stop,” Riner said in 2013, according to The Associated Press.

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