Lance Armstrong

Lance Armstrong’s lifetime ban could be reduced

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“There will be the possibility of a reduction” of Lance Armstrong‘s ban if he assists in doping investigations, the International Cycling Union (UCI) president said Thursday.

“It all depends on what information Lance has and what he’s able to reveal,” UCI president Brian Cookson said, according to The Associated Press. “Actually that’s not going to be in my hands. He’s been sanctioned by USADA.”

The U.S. Anti-Doping Agency (USADA) banned Armstrong for life in 2012 and would have to be the organization to approve scaling it back in the event Armstrong provides new information about doping cases.

“[USADA] would have to agree to any reduction in his sanction based on the validity and strength of the information that he provided,” Cookson said. “If they’re happy, if WADA are happy, then I will be happy.”

However, Cookson said he won’t be calling Armstrong.

“I am deliberately not speaking to anyone involved,” he said, according to VeloNews. “That’s the job of the [UCI’s independent] commission. Lance Armstrong will be able to contact them, just the same as everyone else.

“I am aware that Armstrong is keen to contribute, but I’ve kept one step backward from the process. I don’t want to be seen as interfering in any way.”

Armstrong has said he could be open to testifying with “100 percent transparency and honesty,” if he’s treated fairly compared to others from cycling’s doping era.

“If everyone gets the death penalty, then I’ll take the death penalty,” he told the BBC in November. “If everyone gets a free pass, I’m happy to take a free pass. If everyone gets six months, then I’ll take my six months.”

Lance Armstrong bought race win, Italian cyclist says

Two more fencers qualify for U.S. Olympic team

Alexander Massialas
AP
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Nowhere is the U.S. more deep in fencing than in men’s foil, with four of the top 10 in the world.

Two of those four qualified for the Rio Olympics based on rankings updated after a competition last weekend — world No. 1 Alexander Massialas and No. 6 Gerek Meinhardt.

Expect No. 5 Race Imboden and No. 10 Miles Chamley-Watson to join them on the Rio team, qualifying by mid-April. That quartet also made up the 2012 U.S. Olympic men’s foil team.

They are the 19th and 20th members of the U.S. Olympic team across all sports. View the complete roster here.

Imboden and Chamley-Watson are now battling to see who will be the third individual U.S. men’s foil fencer in Rio, with the fourth going to the Games as a possible competitor in the team event only.

Though Imboden is ranked higher internationally, it’s Chamley-Watson who controls his own destiny as he is better-placed in U.S. Fencing rankings that determine the Rio roster.

Since 2014, Massialas, Meinhardt and Imboden have all been ranked No. 1 in the world at one time or another. Chamley-Watson is a former world No. 2 and the only U.S. man to earn a World or Olympic title (2013 Worlds) in any fencing event.

Massialas took silver and Meinhardt bronze at the 2015 World Championships. Imboden reached the round of 16. Chamley-Watson lost in the first round to German Peter Joppich, a four-time World champion.

At the London Olympics, Massialas and Imboden were eliminated in the round of 16 and Chamley-Watson in the round of 32.

Meinhardt, who competed at Beijing 2008 as the youngest U.S. Olympic fencer ever, joined them in the team event, where the U.S. fell in the semifinals and the bronze-medal matchup. All were age 22 and younger at the London Games.

With four of the top 10 in the world, the U.S. could go into Rio as the favorite in the team event, though it fell in the 2015 Worlds quarterfinals to eventual champion Italy.

U.S. women’s sabre fencers Mariel Zagunis and Ibtihaj Muhammad qualified for the Olympics the previous weekend.

VIDEO: Chamley-Watson takes fencing to New York City streets

Paris 2024 Olympic bid logo unveiled on Arc de Triomphe

Paris 2024
Paris 2024
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The Paris 2024 Olympic bid logo was unveiled at the Arc de Triomphe at 20:24 (8:24 p.m.) on Tuesday.

The logo is a representation of the number 24 and a modern interpretation of the Eiffel Tower.

Paris, seeking to host the Olympics on the 100-year anniversary of its second time holding the Games, is bidding against Budapest, Los Angeles and Rome.

Paris hopes to become the second city to host the Olympics three times, joining London.

International Olympic Committee members will vote to choose the 2024 Olympic host city in September 2017.

MORE: 2024 Olympic bidding coverage

 

Paris 2024