Viktor Tikhonov

1980 Soviet hockey coach’s grandson on Russia Olympic Team

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The Miracle on Ice will probably be mentioned once or twice when the U.S. men’s hockey team plays Russia on Feb. 15.

Both sides in Sochi have ties to the famed 1980 Olympics game.

The U.S. roster includes defenseman Ryan Suter, son of Bob Suter, who played for the U.S. Olympic Team in 1980. The Suter story has been told often, as Ryan also played on the 2010 Olympic Team.

The Russia roster released two weeks ago included forward Viktor Tikhonov, a first-time Olympian. Tikhonov, 25, shares his name with the coach of the 1980 Soviet Union Olympic Team, who is his grandfather.

The older Tikhonov, once a Central Red Army colonel, was known as an iron-fisted coach for the 1980, ’84, ’88 and ’92 Olympic Teams. He has been called the Tolstoy of Soviet hockey. It appears he hasn’t changed at age 83.

“Of course my grandfather congratulated me when I told him I was on the team,” Tikhonov told the Moscow Times. “He was very proud to hear the news but first asked me why my club team had lost its last game.”

Tikhonov has never played at a World Championships — injury reportedly kept him out the last two times — and has a chunk of one season of NHL experience. Now with SKA St. Petersburg in the KHL, he was chosen for the Russian team over the likes of seasoned NHL forward Alexander Semin.

The Moscow Times interviewed a hockey analyst from a Russian sports daily who said Tikhonov was not selected for the Olympics because of his family ties, that he had earned it.

Tikhonov is far different from his grandfather. He has a California accent and surfer hair and visited Russia for the first time at age 15 with an American passport.

“I received my Russian passport when I was 16 or 17,” Tikhonov told the newspaper. “I am Russian by blood and I cannot imagine playing for another national team. But I still spend time in the U.S. in the summer. I guess I am a Russian-American mix.”

The Globe and Mail recalled an interesting story when a young Tikhonov did go to Moscow and worked out at the Central Red Army headquarters.

“Every day, I’d go over to eat with my grandparents and the last day he came with me and said, ‘I’m just going to watch you work out and see what you’re doing and maybe give you a few pointers.’ So I went in, spent half an hour working out and then he stopped me and said: ‘Turn the music off. You’re not going to do this again. Forget this.’

“Then he took me through a workout that was probably 20 or 30 minutes – the time flew by – little weights, lots of jumping, all legs. I couldn’t walk for two days. He said, ‘This is 30 or 40 per cent of what you should be doing every day.’ I said, ‘Oh, my God.’ “

His father, Vasily, coached in various roles for the San Jose Sharks organization from 1993 to 1999 and died in August, falling from a fourth-floor apartment window.

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Mikaela Shiffrin wins Aspen World Cup slalom

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With a slalom win today in Aspen, Colo., Mikaela Shiffrin broke some of the barriers she had been chasing.

“I don’t know if the stars will ever align like that again,” Shiffrin said in a media conference after being told she won with the biggest margin of victory in the history of women’s slalom since 1968: 3.07 seconds. “I don’t think [my competitors] are going to let me get away with three seconds ever again.”

En route to her fourth consecutive slalom World Cup title – which would tie the record for the most with Switzerland’s Vreni Schneider from 1992-95 – she became the first female skier to win four World Cup slalom races in a row since Austria’s Marlies Schild did it in the 2011-12 season.

In addition, Shiffrin became the first female skier from the U.S. to win a slalom World Cup race in Aspen. And she’s now tied with France’s Perrine Pelen for sixth overall with total slalom World Cup victories.

“I was pissed after I made that ridiculous mistake yesterday,” Shiffrin said to media, referencing yesterday’s giant slalom crash. Both her and Lindsey Vonn crashed and did not finish in Aspen’s giant slalom. “I tried to use that anger today.”

Shiffrin called the mistake a “brainfart” and Vonn dismissed it because “giant slalom isn’t [her] strongest event.”

But, Shiffrin added that she already has her mind set on tomorrow, where she races slalom again, on NBC at 3 p.m. ET. The complete of the Olympic sports schedule is here.

“I just as quickly have to go back and settle in,” she said. “Tomorrow is a new race. I have to find a different motivation and try to take the same mentality and keep fighting.”

Slovakia’s Veronika Velez Zuzulova was second behind Shiffrin, followed by Sweden’s Frida Hansdotter.

By finishing behind Shiffrin in Aspen, Zuzulova extends her slalom World Cup podium finish streak to four.

Hansdotter has the second-most second place World Cup slalom finishes at 13 total, including today’s race. Only Pernilla Wiberg, of Sweden, has more with a total of 14.

MORE: Shiffrin, Vonn discuss friendship and rivalry

Fencing great Valentina Vezzali fails to qualify for Rio 2016

Mario Monti, Valentina Vezzali
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TURIN, Italy (AP) – Six-time Olympic champion fencer Valentina Vezzali has failed to qualify for next year’s Rio de Janeiro Games.

The 41-year-old Vezzali was eliminated in the second round of the foil event at the Trofeo Inalpi meet Saturday, while Italian teammate Arianna Errigo reached the semifinals and gained the necessary points to qualify.

Vezzali won at least one gold at the last five Olympics in either individual or team foil. She has a total of nine Olympic medals and 25 at world championships.

Her second son was born in 2013, the year in which she also became a member of Italy’s parliament.

Vezzali told the Gazzetta dello Sport this week that “I had another son and it was really difficult to come back. … I don’t think I have anything else to prove.”

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