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Cash cow: Kaitlyn Farrington finds unusual way to fund Olympic training

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Kaitlyn Farrington’s parents did whatever they could to help their daughter make it to Sochi. As this video from NBC Olympics.com reveals, affording Olympic-level training meant selling off cows from the family farm in Sunny Valley, Idaho.

In fact, the 24-year-old women’s halfpipe competitor admits that it cost them all of their cows.

” … Every week before [a] snowboard trip – on Wednesdays, I think – was the cattle sales. We’d load a cow up into the trailer before I went to school, and he’d take it to the cattle sale and sell it.  And that was my money to go on that weekend trip to go compete,” Farrington told NBCOlympics.com. “We don’t have any cows left after the whole thing happened. Both my parents were just so supportive and knew that I loved snowboarding so much.  And so they wanted to see me do well.”

Much like fellow U.S. halfpipe contender Arielle Gold, this will be Farrington’s Olympic debut. Joining mainstays Kelly Clark and Hannah Teter may seem intimidating on paper, but the group insists they’re very close, with Clark noting that they “genuinely care about one another.”

“I don’t think anyone tries to keep secrets about [the tricks they’re working on],” Farrington said. “I think watching somebody do something inspires [me]. If you’ve never done that trick, you want to do it or make yours better because [you think], ‘Wow, that was awesome. I wish mine was like that.’”

When asked about her other favorite sports, Farrington named golf and surfing because they provide her with such humbling experiences (being that she isn’t very good at them).

Considering the sacrifices her family made to help her get to this level, it probably shouldn’t come as a surprise that she values being humbled every now and then.

Clark took gold at X-Games while Farrington came in third.

Lindsey Vonn among Olympic medalists in documentary about gender in sports

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Olympic medalists Lindsey VonnHilary Knight and Ann Meyers-Drysdale will feature in TOMBOY, an hourlong, multi-platform documentary project aiming to elevate the conversation about gender in sports.

TOMBOY, which will premiere in March, is told through the voices of many of the world’s most prominent female athletes, broadcasters and sports executives.

It will air across all NBC Sports Regional Networks, NBCSN and select NBC-owned TV stations (check local listings). Clips can be found here. More information can be found here.

In an interview clip, Vonn discusses a challenge unique to her sport — fear.

“In my sport, you can’t be afraid,” said the 2010 Olympic downhill champion, who continues to come back from high-speed crashes and major injuries. “Ski racing is an incredibly dangerous sport. It definitely would not be safe if you were afraid of going 90 miles per hour.”

Knight, a two-time Olympic silver medalist, said that at age 5 one of her grandmothers told her that girls don’t play hockey.

“Since age 5, I’ve been working toward an Olympic dream,” said Knight, the MVP of the last two world championships. “Fifteen years later, I ended up at my first Olympic Games.”

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VIDEO: Vonn crashes out of World Cup super-G

Michael Phelps cites ‘frustration’ in testimony for congressional anti-doping hearing

RIO DE JANEIRO, BRAZIL - AUGUST 14:  Michael Phelps of the United States speaks during a press conference at the Main Press Centre on August 14, 2016 in Rio de Janeiro, Brazil.  (Photo by Jamie Squire/Getty Images)
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In written testimony, Michael Phelps said he was frustrated with the uncertainty of whether he was competing against clean athletes in Rio ahead of a congressional hearing looking at ways to improve the international anti-doping system.

“Rio was also unique because of increased doping concerns,” Phelps wrote in a 1,300-word letter, published ahead of his appearance at a congressional hearing Tuesday in Washington, D.C. “In the year leading up to the Games, there was uncertainty and suspicion; I, along with a number of other athletes, signed a petition requesting that all athletes be tested in the months prior to the Games. Unfortunately, the uncertainty remained, even through the Games, and I watched how this affected my teammates and fellow competitors. We all felt the frustration, which undermines so much of the belief and confidence we work so hard to build up to prepare for the Olympics.”

Phelps is one of five witnesses called to testify at Tuesday’s 10:15 a.m. ET hearing, which will be webcast at http://energycommerce.house.gov/.

Phelps is expected to be joined by:

Adam Nelson, 2004 U.S. Olympic shot put champion
Travis Tygart, U.S. Anti-Doping Agency CEO
Dr. Richard Budgett, IOC Medical and Scientific Director
Rob Koehler, World Anti-Doping Agency Deputy Director General

“Throughout my career, I have suspected that some athletes were cheating, and in some cases those suspicions were confirmed,” Phelps wrote. “Given all the testing I, and so many others, have been through I have a hard time understanding this. In addition to all the tests during competitions, I had to notify USADA as to where I would be every day, so they would be able to conduct random tests outside of competition. This whole process takes a toll, but it’s absolutely worth it to keep sport clean and fair. I can’t adequately describe how frustrating it is to see another athlete break through performance barriers in unrealistic timeframes, knowing what I had to go through to do it. I watched how this affected my teammates too. Even the suspicion of doping is disillusioning for clean athletes.”

Phelps reiterated that he hopes another athlete breaks his record of 28 Olympic medals.

“But for that to happen, he must believe he or she will get a fair opportunity to compete,” Phelps wrote. “If we allow our confidence in fair play to erode, we will undermine the power of sport, and the goals and dreams of future generations. The time to act is now. We must do what is necessary to ensure the system is fair and reliable, so we can all believe in it.”

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MORE: Michael Phelps ‘would probably do’ another Olympics if not for injury risk